Flood Water on Corn Roots??

Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by DagoDucks, Aug 19, 2016.

  1. DagoDucks

    DagoDucks Senior Refuge Member

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    Can any of you tell me what is going to happen to our corn now that it has anywhere from 6 - 16" of water on it? It was planted on June 3rd and should have been into the milk stage when we started to flood on Monday. My concern is that the plants will be killed and the ears will not dry down, resulting in rotting ears. A couple of years ago we planted late (July 1st) and the corn was frost killed resulting in rotting ears.
    The ears on the right are all off of flood affected areas whereas the ear on the left was planted on high ground about a month before the others.
    We have been pumping water back out of the field hoping to save some of the corn but not certain that will even help at this point. Is there any chance these ears will dry down properly?

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  2. MALLARD MAGICIAN

    MALLARD MAGICIAN Elite Refuge Member

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    Get the water off in 2-4 days, most will be OK...hurt, but ok. If water sits up under for much longer your plant will die and you will not have any corn.
     
  3. bwelty

    bwelty Elite Refuge Member

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    It just depends on if the corn plant stays alive or not until the corn can black layer. Most of the time it will not reach physiological maturity, how long after you picked those ears was the picture taken? The ear of corn on the left should be getting closer to black layer(about 35% moisture). The ear on the far right has gone through some stress as it has tipped back due to heat or lack of water, or lack of pollination and looks an ear from an outside row of corn. The water is probably going to hurt your yield if it stays on the plant too long from a lack of oxygen. Post some pics of the corn in about two weeks after the water comes off. Would like to see the corn plants.
     
  4. bwelty

    bwelty Elite Refuge Member

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    What does your corn look like now?
     
  5. DagoDucks

    DagoDucks Senior Refuge Member

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    Haven't been back since. Hoping to get out there Thursday to shoot some doves and take a look at it. The farmer got most (80%) of the water out of the field over 4 days of pumping so I have some hope that we didn't lose all of it.
     
  6. DagoDucks

    DagoDucks Senior Refuge Member

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    I finally got out to take a look at our corn yesterday. The corn that had water on it the longest has all fallen over. However the ears that were on it have hardened and have been getting eaten by the teal and wood ducks. The next group of corn that had water on it for as much as 6 days still is upright but probably wont be for long as it looks like the stalks have deteriorated. Those ears have hardened as well and produced a decent yield. All in all I have to say I am surprised that the ears dried down instead of rotting. It helps to get lucky once in a while!
    Will post some pics tomorrow.
     
  7. DisplacedDuck

    DisplacedDuck Senior Refuge Member

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    An early flooding of 'duck' corn (that is, corn planted for waterfowl consumption) isn't necessarily the worst thing in the world IF the water can be taken back off in a short amount of time. However, if the water stays on the corn, or even if the roots are super-saturated, the deterioration process of the plants support system begins.

    The NRCS research states that once super-saturated or submerged, corn will begin to deteriorate in 50-60 days or less. So it may not be of much surprise that the corn in the lowest area of the field has fallen over, as it may have started the deterioration process back in August if the roots stayed wetted.
     
  8. DagoDucks

    DagoDucks Senior Refuge Member

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    I wanted to post an update on how things have played out at our property this year. So far we have had a record year in terms of ducks harvested. After 2 consecutive "bad" years this year feels like we have won the duck lottery. Prior to the big freeze we experienced on Sunday December 17th we were averaging 4.05 ducks per man per hunt. That being said mallards have only made up 15% of our harvest this year. Gadwall, Shovelers, Teal then Mallards have made up the bulk of our kills.
    I am not sure if the condition of the corn crop has anything to do with the makeup of our harvest. However, our field was mainly planted in Soybeans with strips of corn planted for the ducks. A large portion of those soybeans went unharvested as another late rain put water into much of the field. All of the corn that flooded early has long fallen over. That which did not have water on it is still standing, some has been eaten but most has not. With the huge numbers of snow geese in the area now it shouldn't take long to determine if they like this corn.
    I am still curious as to whether the damage that was done to the corn by the late flooding impacted the way Mallards are using our property or is this just a statistical fluke in relation to the mallard harvest.
     
  9. AndyMo2005

    AndyMo2005 Elite Refuge Member

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    I would take a 4 duck average of anything anytime bud. Glad its working out.
     
  10. WHUP ! Hen

    WHUP ! Hen Elite Refuge Member

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    I don't think it was a good year for Mallards. Much of our bags were like yours. Lotsa Gaddies.
     

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