What is this plant or weed?

Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by patj, Dec 31, 2016.

  1. ArmChair Biologist

    ArmChair Biologist New Member

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    Dec 16, 2016
    It really doesn't look like chara...I was just being polite to the previous poster. Chara is great duck food but it doesn't look like your photo. I'm 95% percent sure it's Sago...and I identify wetland plants for a living.
     
  2. JFG

    JFG Elite Refuge Member

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    Location:
    Coastal NC
    Boatdriver, are you sure about Wigeon grass (Ruppia maritimabi) only being able to grow/live in brackish waters? The link above says it can live in either fresh or salt water up to 10 parts per thousand so I was curious about your findings.
     
  3. Billy Bob

    Billy Bob Elite Refuge Member

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    Location:
    Washington
    Sago.
     
  4. patj

    patj Senior Refuge Member

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    Jul 21, 2002
    Location:
    Blanchard, Oklahoma
    Ok, so let's say it is Sago and I want to transplant it. This is central OK. When and how do I go about transplanting?
     
  5. DComeaux

    DComeaux Senior Refuge Member

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    Nov 11, 2013
    Location:
    South Louisiana
    Good to know..Thanks!
    "Southern Naiad, Bushy Pondweed
    is often confused with sago pondweed and widegeongrass."
     
  6. boatdriver

    boatdriver Refuge Member

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    Aug 29, 2013
    Location:
    LA

    Yes, it CAN grow in fresher waters, BUT these are usually tidal marshes that have a slight influence of salinities. THis is why you see UP TO 10 ppt. We've actually seen in our studies down here in tidal marshes growing in salinities up to 15 ppt. These marshes are usually fresher in content, with a slight 2-3 ppt of salinity, and as the tide rolls in, can get as high as 12-15 ppt. Guess what I'm trying to say is that you won't see Ruppia maratima on ponds and lakes in the interior US.
     

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