16 ga. vs. 28 ga.

Discussion in 'Upland Game Forum' started by Brdhntr47, Dec 28, 2005.

  1. Brdhntr47

    Brdhntr47 Elite Refuge Member

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    Well I spent several hours last night and another hour this morning trying to decide what gun to take Bobwhite Quail hunting this morning. I normally shoot a 16 ga. A.H. Fox and have great confidence in my ability with that gun. Last night however I thought I would take my fathers 28 ga. Parker. It's been sitting in my safe since he died last Christmas and wasn't been out since he last used it. Even though I may not get as many birds I think it's time I took the Parker for a walk. There I decided,it's going to be the Parker, I hope I shoot it as well as he did.

    Dennis
     
  2. Greybeard

    Greybeard Elite Refuge Member

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    ....you couldn't have gone wrong. For me, the greatest struggle would have been between the Fox and the Parker.....not the gauge.
    On second thought, I might have been induced to take BOTH of them and alternate from one to the other, morning and afternoon. You see, I am addicted to the fine Double guns.
    P.S. Hudson Valley, NY.?....wow.....a perfect place for you to be sporting a pair of guns like that.
     
  3. Brdhntr47

    Brdhntr47 Elite Refuge Member

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    Dan - The 28 ga. Parker and I had a nice walk. Scenting conditions were pretty poor but my setter found enough birds for me to take a dozen. The bad part was that it took me 22 shells to do it. My father would have considered that an outstanding hunt,he judged the day's hunt by the number of shells fired,not the size of the bag. Most of the birds were in pretty thick briars and brush and I was hunting alone,so most of the shots I had were not great. I trimmed a bunch of trees to kill those birds. :l

    Dennis
     
  4. Greybeard

    Greybeard Elite Refuge Member

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    ....finest wing shot I ever hunted with and that includes well over a 100 people. In 31 straight Opening Days for Pheasant & Quail we saw him miss one ( count 'em), ONE bird....and that Pheasant got right up into the Sun.
    It sounds like you had an awesome day and I'm totally re-assured that the Parker Brothers thank you greatly for not leaving them at home. A dozen nice, plump Woodcock would represent a great SEASON for us here in Illinois as they are one of those migrators that demands you must be there when they drop in on their way through. We seldom get a chance at more than two on any day.
    Do you hunt with dogs?.....Setters, Britts, Pointers?

    Glad you had a good day.

    P.S. Sorry about that! My poor old mind must have wandered off. You were hunting QUAIL,...not Woodcock!
     
  5. Brdhntr47

    Brdhntr47 Elite Refuge Member

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  6. twospots

    twospots Elite Refuge Member

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    Good choice... Not only sentamental reasons, but Quail should not be hunted with anything larger than a 20 ga in many peoples opinion... I could care less, but I have been told by quite a few southern quail hunters that you do not hunt quail with 16 and 12 ga guns... So there ya go. Always fun to get more shots in anyway...lol.
     
  7. Greybeard

    Greybeard Elite Refuge Member

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    ....here in Central Illinois.
    I'm not familiar with the Ryman Setters. Is it a local strain?
    I've had 11 bird dogs in my life....a couple "fair" ones, two that were exceptional and the rest just "grub hounds.":D
    The exceptional one I had was out of Herb Holmes famous "Gunsmoke." She was really something and I was just in my mid-twenties then, but old age now "hunts just ahead of me" and my days afield are few. Arthritis is no friend to a bird hunter.
    I'de like to know more about your Setter.:tu
     
  8. BigRedDog

    BigRedDog Senior Refuge Member

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    My great-grandfather thought it was uncivil to shoot anything larger that a 20 gauge at quail and as a matter of fact he only shot a 28 gauge. Now his great-grandson has been known to shoot a 12 gauge at quail Â…but that is all in my...I mean his past now. ;)
     
  9. setter

    setter Elite Refuge Member

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    beautiful dogs bred by mr. george ryman fron old time show stock that still hunted.i got one of the last dogs mr. ryman bred in 69 . mr ryman passed, his widow remarried mr. ryman's best friend and the line continued til ms. ryman left the line to de coverly kennels in pa. large calm dogs that possess a fair amount of intelligence. these dogs hunt at a comfortable range and pace break on their own and retrieve naturally great with kids and other dogs, how do i know, i owned and loved ryman setters for 25 years til i lost my last female to cancer. they are very calm,sweet tempered dogs great for a gentleman hunter
     
  10. Greybeard

    Greybeard Elite Refuge Member

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    ....the 50's, 60's and 70's. In this area, the creek beds were still fringed with trees, high grasses, horseweed and the like. Hedge rows (Osage Orange) still formed the boundries of fields...soil protection against the fierce Winter winds and a great home for many coveys of Quail.
    We still farmed with the 3 bottom plow, disc and harrow. Every farm carried cattle and, therefore, hay fields and fences grown-in with high grass like foxtail, Briars and such. Seldom could you see a field over 100 acres without a fence, sedge grass waterway, brush or a hedge row.
    We harvested Corn with 4 row picker which left a lot of whole ears on the ground. This was winter food for the game birds and animals.
    That was a grand time of many Bird Dog owners having local trials and the competition was fierce with 6 or 7 excellent trainers right here.
    Then came the new methods of farming which eliminated nearly 90% of the previous cover and the game birds disappeared as if they had never been here. Along with the birds went the trainers and their kennels and the horses and another era passed on in the annals of time.
     

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