16 ga. vs. 28 ga.

Discussion in 'Upland Game Forum' started by Brdhntr47, Dec 28, 2005.

  1. Brdhntr47

    Brdhntr47 Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    1,773
    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2003
    Location:
    Hudson Valley,N.Y.
    The past is a great place to linger on occassion and I often think I would have been very happy to have done my hunting back then. I just got back last night from a waterfowl hunt on the Chesapeake. The "young" fellow I hunt the Chesapeake with has a wish that he could go back to the market hunting era and hunt one day on the Bay. He would give anything to have seen the Canvasbacks "rafted as far as a man could see and then to see them blacken the sky in the morning".
    As one "matures" in this bird hunting life it's a given that you will want to have hunted in a earlier time. I often hear young fella's wishing they could have hunting like grandad had. Then I just kind of chuckle when I think that I may have hunted with their grandad.

    Dennis
     
  2. Greybeard

    Greybeard Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    14,550
    Joined:
    May 16, 2000
    Location:
    Springfield,Illinois
    ......some of those "so many ducks the sky blacked out" days in the late 40's/early 50's down on the southern end of the Illinois River. It was truly unbelieveable!:eek:
    I was just a kid but I had the distinct feeling then that I might be witnessing the last of an era.......which was true. I just couldn't see the extent to which modern farming would change hunting forever.:cry
     
  3. BigRedDog

    BigRedDog Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    230
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2003
    Location:
    Broken Arrow Oklahoma
    Same with quail hunting in northwest Oklahoma when I was growing up as a kid. We would hunt our home place (160 acres right behind the house) before noon Thanksgiving dinner (noon) and by the time you got to the far corner of the place you should have limited on quail if you could shoot straight. Now it takes most of the day to scare up a limitÂ…IF you limit.
     
  4. Greybeard

    Greybeard Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    14,550
    Joined:
    May 16, 2000
    Location:
    Springfield,Illinois
    ........it took me 5 trips this Winter to get 10 Quail. Part of that was because I was taught to never overshoot a covey but the lack of cover and birds was the main reason. I managed to lump 3 Rooster Pheasants into that total bag also and will have my boys and a couple of their buddies in on Super Bowl Sunday for a feast.
    I can't think of anything more enjoyable than hunting behind a really good, well trained Pointer or Setter. (Well, maybe a good clear stream full of Trout or Smallmouth Bass can lead me astray with my Flyrod, too.):D
     
  5. BigRedDog

    BigRedDog Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    230
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2003
    Location:
    Broken Arrow Oklahoma
    Greybeard,

    If I am not wondering the fields with my retrievers I am in the rivers in Missouri and Arkansas chasing trout with a fly rod.

    Summers find me for three or four weeks chasing trout and running field trials in Wyoming and Colorado.

    You ever get to Ozarks fly fishing?
     
  6. setter

    setter Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,648
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2002
    Location:
    new jersey
    one of my many mentors was uncle john, not actually my uncle. year was 74 .returning home ,pop my mothers father took care of anf thoughly spoiled my girls while i was gone,both of my setters grew fat and happy under pops care. after of few years without me pop and the girls returned to the field,a very happy reunion in chester county pa. . pheasants everywhere, nothing to have 50 birds a day pointed.pop went with me to supervise my care of his girls now,they were fed eggs and pancakes every day during my years away and now were pops girls, they handled for pop and brought every bird shot to pop/ a beautiful brace of setter an irish and an orange belton ryman.worked very well to together the irish was rangy and the ryman stuck close but would range out on the edge of a bean field.hunted jersey too for quail. started killing a few ducks on the stream edges as we hunted . now i wanted too hunt ducks so i started asking around at sporting goods stores,and was directed to donnie wilkinson and his family. dons family grew up on the delaware river and knew waterfowl like no one else. today don is the state waterfowl biologist in charge of marsh acquistion and restoration projects. dons family took in in showing me how to duck hunts,set decoys ,work tides and carve decoys out of cork. don uncle still lived on the river and built cedar strip skiffs for rail bird hunting,uncle john was well into his 70's when i met him .his boats were beautiful and his decoys very effective carved from jersey swamp cedar, uncle john was remarkable ,he had been a market hunter and a guide taking all the sports from philadelphia rail bird hunting and duck shooting. uncle john was a deadly shot with an old hump back browning,as were all the wilkinson clan.these were great people that took me in as one of the family.i can't say how many meals i've eaten under their rooves. uncle uncle and donnie built me my first sneak box,a widgeon under zack taylors design. next came the deadly dozen 13 big black cork mallards and blacks,these decoys cancelled flights for the next twenty years .uncle jonh showed me how to rasp and sand the cork and whittle the heads . uncle johns boats are now in the maritime museum in philadelphia pa. his decoys holding honored spots on end tables and mantles throughout the area. daily limits were like 20 birds but uncle john spoke of 100 bird limits and days where the bag was very full.these peoples lively hoods were dependent of good shooting for the sports or the market. uncle john always called me boy,not derogarorily but i felt with warmth. he admitted i had good setters which made me very proud as he knew dogs and compliments from that man were to be treasures , through the lessons and guidance learned from the wilkinson family i learned enough to be come a very successful water fowler. blacks along the delaware river ,and shore areas,woodies and mallards from cedar swamps AND CRANERRY BOGS.UNCLE JOHN SHOWED WHAT SWAMPs held woodcock and grouse,what little creeks held woodies by the score.this was a great time for a young man with the zest for the outdoors. dons aunt harriet made us crab cakes and broiled weakfish and flounder from the back bays we duck hunted in , my father became friends with the wilkinsons and we spent many a fine day in each other company,fishing hunting ,or just petting a lab 's ear while sharing a warm fireplace or a cold drink. don's dad became a second father to me and was called pop by don and i both.uncle john passed on to go spend eternity in a oak coffin he built himself in his boat shack,he even carved ducks in the lid. my life as been much richer due to these great folks.don and his wife sue are still great friends as are his daughter jennifer and her two beautiful daughters megan and morgan,future lil duck hunters too i bet as they love pop pop don to pieces . end of todays glance back to 50 years in the outdoors
     
  7. arrowhawk

    arrowhawk Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    1,306
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2002
    Location:
    Long Island, New York
    I really have nothing to add to this post but would like to say it is one of the better post I have read in a while.
    By the above standards I am a newbie. I started hunting in 1971 or 1972 not really sure. I do remember the large rafts of broadbill ducks.
    And the large numbers of ducks in general.
     
  8. Brdhntr47

    Brdhntr47 Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    1,773
    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2003
    Location:
    Hudson Valley,N.Y.
    GLANCING BACK......... about forty years ago,we had some of the best woodcock hunting you could ever imagine. I loved woodcock hunting and there was nothing I would rather do. My father on the other hand was a dedicated pheasant hunter and hunted every day of the season. I hunted with him on weekends,holidays and any day's WE could convince my mother I was too sick to go to school. We had one area we hunted that consisted of three or four dairy farms and their associated corn fields. Well back in those days the cows would wander out of the pastures and get in the brush and wood lots that covered the low wet areas. Those cows would leave lots of manure behind and that manure would draw earthworms. And the combination of soft soil and lots of worms produced woodcock hunting that you could not believe.
    Well, my father always claimed he made every effort to keep the dogs focused on the pheasant hunting and away from those alder bottoms and poplar stands but sooner or later one of the dogs would point a woodcock on an edge and away I would go. My father would start yelling at me as soon as the dog pointed, "kill that woodcock and get back out of there,we're here to pheasant hunt". But unfortunately for my father and the pheasant hunt,once I got in the woodcock cover there was no getting me out. If the flight birds were in, it could be a very short hunt. If not I would hunt the whole covert out while my father would stand on the outside and yell at me to "get those dogs under control and out of that stuff and back to pheasant hunting". Well when I'd finally "get the dogs out" of one of those alder bottoms my father would be sitting on a stone wall laughing. The first question was always "how many did you get". He'd look at the birds,laugh at me and we'd get back to pheasant hunting. Now the strange part was,if I had not killed my five bird woodcock limit in that first covert,the pheasant hunt would somehow lead us to another woodcock covert in very short order. And we'd follow the same routine all over again. Once I had my woodcock limit my father would say "well if you're finally done with those woodcock let's go hunt what we came here for" and we would finish up our pheasant limits.
    Those were some very good day's.

    Dennis
     
  9. Greybeard

    Greybeard Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    14,550
    Joined:
    May 16, 2000
    Location:
    Springfield,Illinois
    .....but yet kind of bittersweet to reflect back on those days....and in particular....of a special day or two that just simply stood out from the rest.
     
  10. setter

    setter Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,648
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2002
    Location:
    new jersey
    aas dennis said those were the days,long seasons and plenty of woodcock,we would find them all over south jersey,along stream edges, in the woods bordering the quail fields, in the pheasant woods, when the flights were in it was great even with no flight birds it was pretty dang good. great birds for young pointing dogs and old men . i hunted with a now pro dog man,norman basilone ,there would be six dogs on the ground at once,pointers,setters gsp's , occasionally a good brit. Cape May point held incredible amounts of birds. We would find woodcock anywhere it was damp,along rte 47 from Millville all the way to the Cape.25 to thirty miles of woodcock covers ,quail fields everywhere. We hunted with a herd of guys,Jimmy buttons,a commercial fisherman with great pointers from Chandler kennels in Texas,big bold dogs,David Robinson with a brace of awesome tri-colored setters,Big Jimmy Seibert ,looked like a mountain man 6 ft 5 about 300 lbs,had a pair of great shorthairs,Jimmy was a retired school teacher turned carver,world class trophy winning carver and great duck and woodcock man. Big JImmy's decoys are awesome, he made awesome black cork gunning stool and built sneak boxes and lil pond boxes for gunning. Jimmy lived of the marsh and had great woodcock covers on his property.Dan Cluff lived on the cape itself and had permission to gun everywhere. My first ryman came from Dannie's bitch and she was a bird machine,not real stylish but a real ole time meat dog.solid on point and a natural retriver.I bred MIsty 4 times every pup wasa bird dog,all naturals that trained themselves. one Christmas eve i got everybody on the bad list ,we went hunting 4 of us in my old van 3 good dogs. We started on the Delaware bay killed limits of pheasant early.than off to the quail field we were very close to limiting like 25 quail in the bag when we stopped at Big Jimmies. He met us with THE BIRDS ARE IN!!!off We went to the Cape Donnie Wilkinson killed his limit flyin over the truck as i put bells on the dogs. Steve Mayo aka Quick THREE-bang bang bang-Mayo was burning shells at an incredible rate with no results when Donnie says-Mayo how the hell do you afford to hunt. Steve answers- Easy as he pulls out a box of shells holds them up pointing to them -K-MArT $ 2.97. i dang near pee'd myself. we limited but hit home at 8:30 ,everyone was in the dog house with the wife and of course it was my fault. That damn Brodie,some of the wives did not even talk to me for near forever after that. And i must admit i was a bad influence on some of our crew. but it was all in fun in the outdoors. great times that will always be remembered. looking back again.days that will live on forever in the mid-night thoughts of an aging orphan
     

Share This Page