$20,000,000,000,000

Discussion in 'Political Action Forum' started by pointblind, Sep 11, 2017.

  1. API

    API Political Action Forum Moderator Flyway Manager

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    In terms of using statistical measurements of product quality plus advocating process controls that promote maximizing "first pass yield" to minimize process defects, Deming is indeed legendary. In terms of process engineering and que limiting supply chain management, Toyota's "Kanban" and "JIT" philosophy is pretty much the work of Taiichi Ohno a Toyota Industrial Engineer.
     
  2. Bear

    Bear Elite Refuge Member

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    What API said!!!
     
  3. eel river

    eel river Elite Refuge Member

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    Deming was good, but he still, or his philosophy, couldn't effectively deal with an aging/maturing society and eventual legacy costs. So many pontificated that Japan had it figured out, but it too ran into economic issues somewhat similar to the US. All societies mature through and eventually beyond the industrial phase and then face issues as it largely becomes a service society. This was enhanced further by the globalization process and the broader world wide economy. The US will not significantly prosper if it becomes more nationalized in its approach. Standard of living change, downward, will continue to happen as time goes forward.
     
  4. Bear

    Bear Elite Refuge Member

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    Deming had a clean industrial infrastructure to work with plus a political and social structure not much different than a beehive and drones mentality.

    Ohno's JIT inventory style, also known by several other acronyms, including TPS (Toyota Production Systems) had to be put into place not only for efficiency but limited warehouse space. Factories were built small because of limited resources including capital.

    The system was eventually adopted by many Western manufacturing corporations. You even see it on a minor scale in labor sensitive industries like construction and even the Hotel Restaurant business.

    We bombed the crap out of Germany and Japan during WW2 with the general objective of destroying their industrial base. We still had our industrial base that was in some cases obsolete but brought back into play.

    Anyway...I hated just in time because of the stress it produced on the line and guess whose backside was on the line if the lobsters were cooked before the potatoes were ready.

    The queue had to be perfectly timed to get three hundred potatoes arriving before three hundred lobsters did.

    This also includes JIT labor. We didn't keep a labor force capable of serving 300 to 400 banquet guests. There were several contract labor business that hired high school and college kids to work the large banquets.

    The system was fascinating but like trying to herd cats sometimes.

    We did eat a lot of lobster overruns. :)
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2017
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  5. API

    API Political Action Forum Moderator Flyway Manager

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    That's for sure a matter of conjecture.
    That has the sound of academia looking for an excuse to implement a socialized society.
    Not tooting my own horn too much... During my multi-national career, I was fortunate to participate in the design of a world wide JIT logistics program and then given management accountability for implementing and operating the system. Without beating details to death... we were able to successfully conduct a JIT operation that supplied components from suppliers (both far eastern and the Americas) such that from the time of component delivery until product shipment less then two days elapsed. Further, the products were customer configured via on-line order with a commitment to the customer of shipment within three days of order acceptance (meaning their credit card cleared). The products were notebook/desk top computers and related peripherals. Operational output volume exceeded 1000 units per day. Key to achieving success was the education and understanding of all participants in the process and acceptance of the business culture required. That includes product designers, marketing, component suppliers, vendors, carriers, brokers, customs, not to mention internal operatives. For sure, a commitment to success at each level is required. Its not for the complacent folks, but when all are committed to success it will happen. Those not committed, got left behind.
     
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  6. Bear

    Bear Elite Refuge Member

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    That used to be called "hustle". :tu

    A very nice anecdote to read.

    I know the JIT, while stressful, that stress can become quite addicting. Sometimes our lead time was days not weeks and I remember having several purveyors on the phone at once trying not only to get the best price but the quantity required. Literally two phones in my hands.

    Ethnic holiday banquets were the most interesting because there's only so much of their unique F&B cultural requirements and some of it damned expensive so purveyors didn't want to overstock and have to "eat" a peculiar highly perishable food stuff.

    I'm trying to remember one item that stunk so badly but it was normal it made us gag. Right now I am preoccupied with an is it my water leak or the cities leak in my yard.

    About a $3000 to $5000 fix with plumbers not having to negotiate right now. Woof!!! This Harvey thing has gotten old as I haven't seen my wife in five weeks or my daughter in three. Roads are finally starting to open that had our neighborhood a peninsula.

    Could have been worse...for some it's still brutal. Gotta go...my daughter is texting me.
     
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  7. Ducker 4 Ever

    Ducker 4 Ever Elite Refuge Member

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    Hope things get better for you guys quickly.

    I am in Sugar Land, TX for the week at some training and you wouldn't even know there was a hurricane two weeks ago. Amazing how some areas nearby escaped the disaster.
     
  8. grahler

    grahler Senior Refuge Member

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    Using common sense to solve problems while working for any company never goes out of style. Playing video games is a skill, but an ability to perform some complex finishing move in PS4 street fighter is only helpful maybe if you are a game developer or something.
    To say 100k on a truck was exceptional is poppycock. Too many examples to the contrary for people who use a bit of elbow grease.
    Saying modern throwaway products are good is imo inaccurate. Go buy a front loading washer. Now go buy another three years later after it fails. The look is gorgeous. Cite examples of these great products you love that last a long time...
    On calls...no need to get contentious here.
    I will just say the further south one is the better things need to be done to kill ducks. Haydels is fine. They just aren't my favorite.
    On Toyota jit is looked at by most financially but they don't take into account the Quality part of the philosophy. That's the cornerstone. Quality is everything and it's sad that people think the crap at Wally World or Target can be termed quality for the most part. Toyota took input from folks at all levels not just the top. Big difference from most American companies who view labor as a necessary evil. All this stuff is philosophy. Has little to do with much else. You are either quality driven or not...
    Again Made in America used to mean the best.
    Also Japan is a huge holder now of our debt.
    Almost or maybe even as large as China. IMO we really ought to try to avoid purchasing Chinese crap whenever possible.
    https://hbr.org/2011/06/how-toyota-pulls-improvement-f
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2017
  9. 10GAGENUT

    10GAGENUT Elite Refuge Member Flyway Manager

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    JIT worked for the Japanese initially because they didn't have the customer investment in the U.S. that American manufactures did, it was all about manufacturing and not about parts for a customer base which the Japanese initially did not have here. American manufactures traditionally kept parts on hand for their customers for around 10 years sometimes even longer, which leads to one heck of an inventory and warehousing situation.
    JIT wasn't a miracle breakthrough but basically an unfair advantage the Japanese took over American manufactures simply because they didn't initially have cars that were 10 years old here, for the Japanese it was all about production and not about keeping a customer base happy, it was one way the Japanese could compete with American manufacturers keeping their costs low by not offering something American manufactures did.
     
  10. stevena198301

    stevena198301 Elite Refuge Member

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    I think he's more talking of how a 1975 Chevy pickup would require 2 new engines to make 100K, not that the engines will only cost you $45 and 4 hours to rebuild...
     

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