2018 Farm Bill - Easements

Discussion in 'The Duck Hunters Forum' started by nick b, Jan 2, 2018.

  1. stevena198301

    stevena198301 Elite Refuge Member Supporting Member

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    How many of those 3.5 mil sq miles is actually huntable? How many swamps will be drained and turned into subdivisions and malls for those people? We don't make malls and subdivisions on mountainsides, when we can just drain the flat/low lands around it. And ducks don't breed on mountainsides often.

    I'd say yes, every year more folks pile in, we will lose more swamps.
     
  2. buck_master_2001

    buck_master_2001 Elite Refuge Member

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    Exactly. It’s happening all over the place. As Urban areas continue to expand and the landscape changes more and more huntable land is disappearing. More people require more houses, more work and more food. Anyone thinking otherwise is a complete damn fool. Look back 20 years in areas and compare it to now, guarantee you’ve seen once huntsble ground now no longer huntable.
     
  3. stevena198301

    stevena198301 Elite Refuge Member Supporting Member

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    Nearly all of N. Alabama. What used to be miles of marsh and swamp is now subdivisions and malls. What used to be miles of cornfields is now subdivisions and malls.
     
  4. pintail2222

    pintail2222 Elite Refuge Member

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    They don't have zoning in Huntsville? More hunting land is lost to agriculture development than is lost to urban development.

    Drain tile wiped out more wetlands in western MN than "track" housing.
     
  5. stevena198301

    stevena198301 Elite Refuge Member Supporting Member

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    Sure. I'm going off of what has been told to me by folks who have lived here their whole life (I have not). There used to be really nice, big swamps between Madison and HSV. Now, there is one strip of blacktop between them (and Madison is engulfed by HSV city limits now, even into the next county). Gigantic tracts of cornfields and swamps have been sold to developers, when the old man dies, and the kids want cash instead of land. It doesn't take anytime to have AG land swapped over to residential zoning here. Money talks.
     
  6. pintail2222

    pintail2222 Elite Refuge Member

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    If zoning allows it.
     
  7. stevena198301

    stevena198301 Elite Refuge Member Supporting Member

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    You musta missed the part about money talking... I've watched no less than 100 subdivisions pop up here in the last 12 years. And that's a pretty conservative number. All were former AG lands (fields and/or swamps owned by X family forever). There is a cow pasture in Research Park that is acre for acre probably one of the most expensive cow pastures in the US.
     
  8. buck_master_2001

    buck_master_2001 Elite Refuge Member

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    Regardless of how the land is being lost, the land is being lost. Simple as that. You only have one life to live and in that life I want to hunt waterfowl. Therefore I’m all for to do what we can so I can continue to enjoy my life.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2018
  9. pintail2222

    pintail2222 Elite Refuge Member

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    Sounds as if Huntsville has a huge footprint. Larger than Philadelphia, Denver, Atlanta and Las Vegas. Who knew?

    http://bigpicturehuntsville.com/plan/demographics/

    As Huntsville’s population and land area have increased, the density (population per square mile) of the city has decreased.

    Huntsville reached a “peak density” of 3,287 ppsm (people per square mile) in 1950. As Huntsville expanded, the population density dropped, and the city’s density is now 879 ppsm as of 2014—a slight increase from 2010’s 874 ppsm. This makes Huntsville the third most sprawling, non-metro government city in the country, behind Norman, Oklahoma and Anchorage, Alaska.

    A key challenge to having such a low-density city is maintaining the infrastructure required for such a broad area.
     
  10. stevena198301

    stevena198301 Elite Refuge Member Supporting Member

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    HSV gobbled up huge amounts of land way into Limestone county, just KNOWING there was gonna be a giant convention center and Bass Pro Shops built alongside I-65 (they worried Decatur would get the business and money, and it would mean the VBC would have competition it could never beat). That came and went, and now they are stuck with all of it. This place is exploding. All that land they gobbled up had some fine marshes on it.
     

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