22-250 scope suggestions

Discussion in 'Varmint Hunters Forum' started by Batman74, Dec 28, 2012.

  1. Batman74

    Batman74 Moderator Moderator

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    I've recently purchased a Thompsom Center Icon for predator hunting. I want to put a quality scope on it. I want to have it zeroed @ 200yds, any suggestions appreciated. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. calling4life

    calling4life Elite Refuge Member

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    Does quality mean to you what it means to me?

    Need more details, $$ limit (please god don't say anything less than $500)
    First focal plane or second?
    Do you dial or hold over?
    Illumination a must?
    Magnification range?

    I'm putting together a new rig for yotes right now, 223,just put half down on my scope for a pre-order special.
    I am going with Bushnell's new hdmr xrs 4.5-30x50 with the horus h59 reticle, FFP of course.
    Great magnification range, built like a tank, repeatable, returns to zero every time, reticle that will allow me precise holds even with the 223's less than stellar ballistics. 10 mil per turn lockable turrets with zero stop, 34mm main tube, not enormous as to cause uneven balance.

    It is as perfect a scope as I can want, at least for my current wants, but was about $1,000 more than I wanted to spend at about $2200.
    I decided I was OK with sacrificing to get my perfect scope, the pre-order special I received made it a definite go.

    So, more details begat better suggestions.
     
  3. Matt Barnard

    Matt Barnard Elite Refuge Member

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    How do I explain to all of the coyotes I have killed through the years that they were sent on to the "Big Pasture" with a $250.00 Simmons? Or the other .250 with a 6x18 Tasco? Or the other .250 with a 4x16 Tasco?I have had several "less than expensive" scopes on several of my varmint guns for up to 38 years, without ever having one problem, ever. Orrrrr, I guess I just imagined that I pulled off a 1200 yard P. dog in Montana, in front of the rancher and the 3 other guys on that trip, with a 6x18 Tasco on a ruger #1. Being able to afford a $1000.00+ scope is nice. But don't beat up on someone 'cause thier budget is limited. And, FYI, I have flown with those guns several times for coyote trips to AZ., back in the 90's. Held thier zero's EVERY time.
    My oldest .22-250 is a 788 with a 3x9 Tasco on it. I have shot ground hogs by the hundreds with it, a couple of thousand p.dogs with it, a bunch of coyotes, and a couple of deer. I think that scope was $95.00 back in '74. Almost 40 years of flawless service.
    Oh I know I don't understand about light transmission, nor am I thouroghly versed on parallax. I just pick up one of my guns and go hunting. I shoot some paper every year,too. All of my .250's shoot under a half inch at a hundred. And I can see through through my economy scopes to shoot quite well at my measured quarter mile range. Sub 3 inch groups at a measured quarter mile is fine with me.
    I am not rippin' on anyone that has the more expensive scopes. Not at all. But, the lesser priced stuff works quite well if the shooter does his part.
    I think I could afford a Nite Force, or a Hukemaw, or a Shephard, but I am gettin' along just fine with what I have.
     
  4. calling4life

    calling4life Elite Refuge Member

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    Oh I know... And all these guys thinking you need to spend $50,000+ on a "real" sports car, my shelby cobra was only $5,000 back in the day

    We used to build things to last, inexpensive scopes from "back in the day" aren't generally comparable to today's, and spending a dollar 40 years ago isn't the same as spending a dollar today.

    There's a reason I asked for details on features he'd like, a Nikon buckmasters for $250 sure is useable, but if I run it in fclass and I'm twisting the "turrets" constantly, are they precise, do they repeat, will it shift zero...

    If it's 30min before sunrise and a world record buck stands at 200 yards, will it provide me with a clear sight picture

    If I drop it, will it hold zero

    It may, but there's a reason serious competitors and our military spend x amount on optics.
    So, more details needed, perhaps $500 would get him what he wants, can't really take a shot without more details...

    And the $500 comment was more an offhanded slight at all these guys that want everything for nothing. I want illumination, 5-40 power, great glass, exposed turrets, all for under my $200 budget... It gets old
    I think you'd agree, generally speaking, you get what you pay for.
     
  5. Matt Barnard

    Matt Barnard Elite Refuge Member

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    You do get what you pay for, probably now more than ever. And the technology has sprung light years ahead of what used to be available, no question about that. But he didn't ask about shootiing a 220" buck at last light with a 7mm @ 300 + yards. It was on a .22-250 for varmint hunting. Like someone else said, most shots are under a hundred. And I know I may be in a minority, but I [me, myself], feel the extra movement of dial this, double check that etc., could-would be more of a pain in the butski. I concede for shooting still targets, that the dials and wheels on your optics would be a great advantage. I recall coyotes coming in, for me anyway, a very fast actioned ordeal.
    As to the "if I drop it"question, that was my reference to having flown with my guns back in the 90's. Checked them all, never a problem. Built like a tank, that's your line.
    I was taught to learn the capabilities and ranges and performance of my gun, scope and bullet combination, very early in my rifle shooting career.
    I'll still stand by ALL of my original statements. It's nice to have the best, but there are lots of others that will do the job you bought them for, if you are willing to do your part.
    PS, I do have Leupolds and original Redfields on some of my other guns also.
     
  6. Batman74

    Batman74 Moderator Moderator

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    I guess I should have put in more info. I hunt in Virginia, I have recently come into some land where I'll have some shots of 200 to 300 yards. Most of the land I hunt my shots are not over 100 yards at best. I have a gun set up with an EOTECH for fast shots. Don't think I'll need anything with turrents for ultra long shots. Most of the guns I have with scopes are rimfire and the scopes are Bushnell 3X9's. That is about my experience with scopes. I hope this helps, thanks.
     
  7. oskar

    oskar Senior Refuge Member

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    My open country rifle is a 22-250 with an Elite 4200 2.5x10x40mm Plenty of power for those long shots, and enough FOV for that coyote that sneaks in behind you. My main rig is a 22-204, nearly as powerful as a 22-250 I run a 1.5x6x40mm Burris Sig Select, with nearly double the FOV of a 2.5 it is perfect for calling preds in sage or areas of trees and more ground cover than grassland where there is a very good chance you won't see a coyote until it is in rock throwing range, it has enough X's for a 300+yrd shot.

    Once you get above the bottom tier of scope models you can get into some very nice glass Leupold VX-II, Nikon Monarch, Burris Sig. Select, and above, any Minox or Zeise. All of these can be found for under $500 and most under $300 if you look hard.

    Have a good hunt
     
  8. Lonehowl

    Lonehowl New Member

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    Predator calling is one of my main pastimes. I shoot a 22-250 99% of the time, for about 20 years now. I have had tons of different rifle/scope setups over the years.

    I know the long range shooting deal and being a "psuedo sniper" is "in" nowdays, but predator calling, to me, is all about actually calling them to you, as close as possible, thats the whole purpose of calling. Thats where the excitement is.

    My point is you dont need expensive, high power glass to be successful(obviously). For years I ran a fixed Leoupold 6x. Killed hundreds of coyotes with it. Ive had the high dollar/high power stuff as well, and did no better.

    Nowdays I run a quality 4x12 scope, and rarley take it above 6x honestly. The less you jack around with twisting stuff on a scope while predator calling, the more you will kill in the long run, I promise ya.
    Mark

    ps...if your shooting tighter cover a lot, consider a shotgun as well.
     
  9. NeLab1

    NeLab1 Moderator Moderator

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    Egos and checkbooks are seldom a good combo, hunting coyotes doesnt take a million dollar bank account, i would find a good quality 3-9x 50 and call it good for were you are hunting.

    most of your shots from the sounds of it are going to be close and the larger field of view will be nice.

    best advice is go to your local sporting goods store have them lay a few scopes out for you to look through and get the clearest one you can afford, and dont look back spend time learning to call them in close.

    and like someone else posted dont count your scatter gun out for killing dogs.

    i have a 3.5x10x50 on my remington vls 22.250 and i can shoot one hole groups all day at 200 you dont need range finding bs learn to judge distance.
     

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