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70 degrees what do you do with a deer?

Discussion in 'Washington Flyway Forum' started by WidgeonmanGH, Aug 20, 2017.

  1. WidgeonmanGH

    WidgeonmanGH Elite Refuge Member

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    You go to craigslist and covert the beer cooler to the deer cooler!
    Almost ready for archery deer season. Hoping not to eat tag soup this year! Last year I got hurt in November so I wasn't able to get out in the late season. Hoping to do better this year.

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  2. Sasha and Abby

    Sasha and Abby Elite Refuge Member

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    I used to hang them. A BETTER way is to skin and quarter the deer (and loins/neck meat) and then put it in a cooler full of ice for 3-5 days, draining the water off each day. This will remove a good portion of the blood from the meat and make further butchering much easier. I would NEVER hang another deer, unless ice was not available. Just an easier and better outcome.
     
  3. WidgeonmanGH

    WidgeonmanGH Elite Refuge Member

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    I skin and then hang. We have always had good results. I have only killed deer during the rife season which is in Oct. so our garage was always cool enough. But with archery in Sept. that is just not an option. I may have to quarter or break them down a bit if we have more than one. Hope springs eternal.
     
  4. H20DAD

    H20DAD Elite Refuge Member

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    Hanging is kinda 1950s.

    If you have access to a vehicle than take home skin and debone.

    If away from vehicles the gutless method into bags is all around better for meat quality.

    Plenty of YouTube info out there.

    Getting the skin off and then the meat off the bone as fast as possible is the best thing for meat quality.
     
  5. Duck_Hunter_88

    Duck_Hunter_88 Refuge Member

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    The best information I've seen comes from the University of Wyoming they study this pretty hard. This debunks a lot myths. The links below lead to the overviews. If you are really interested detailed peer reviewed technical articles can be found also, they are fascinating.

    http://www.uwyo.edu/foods/educational-resources/wild-game.html

    http://www.wyoextension.org/agpubs/pubs/B513R.pdf

    The most flavorless and tough meat I've had from deer, elk and antelope were animals I skinned and boned immediately. Some of the best venison I've had came from deer skinned 24 hrs after shooting in 75oF weather. I try to avoid skinning right away but sometimes you have no choice, for those animals I have a good sausage recipe!

    So why post this here? I have had both tender and tough goose what's odd to me is hot weather (youth hunt) greaters have been really tough. Has anyone studied duck or goose meat aging?
     
  6. WidgeonmanGH

    WidgeonmanGH Elite Refuge Member

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    The fellow writing the article is sometimes a bit wishy washy regarding whether to age or not to age. (so many variables) But in general the practice we held was to field dress it and get it cooling as fast as possible. When we got home we would skin it out and then let it hang for 3-5 days depending on our schedule and then cut and wrap.

    After reading the article I should be able to field dress it , bring it home and put it in the cooler (not skinned) at 37 degrees. Age it for a week (max) skin and cut and wrap.

    In regards to your duck and goose question, I hang mine for at least 2-3 days and if it is cold up to a week. Then I soak my duck breasts in saltwater for a couple of days after that. My duck is always tender. Youth hunt ducks and geese are tough. I was thinking in the early season I might hang my ducks in the cooler as well. :)
     

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