A couple questions...

Discussion in 'Gun Dog Forum' started by Il. MudDuk, Jul 22, 2017.

  1. Il. MudDuk

    Il. MudDuk Elite Refuge Member

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    Our 7 month old Yellow Lab is coming along fine. She eats well, plenty of water and excercise and the vet says she's healthy.

    Its going to be 105 here today so this mornings training session ended after 10 minutes of retrieving bumpers and a goose wing in the yard ( no water retrieves ). Like many of you have stated, I left her "wanting more" and we ended on a good note.

    Anyway, when its warm out ( 85 to 105 ), she pants quite easily and seems intolerant to any sort of heat. She's in her prime, why would she get so hot so easily, particularly after simple work-out / retrieving ? Maybe its just me ( and by no means am I working her til she collapses or gets disoriented) , it just seems like her tongue gets to hanging a little to quickly. Thing is, if I'm messing around in the garage with the door open, she'll go lay in the sun in the grass or even on the warm concrete driveway.

    My other question :
    My daughter gave me a simple plastic whistle with a pea inside. I prefer blowing this whistle vs. the metal one I have. The dog listens well to it.
    Two days ago, I got a Fox40 ( thing is loud !). The dog doesnt seem to listen to it, or at least as readily to it.
    Should I stay with what she's used to ( plastic pea whistle ), move strictly to the Fox40 til she gets used to it, or should I use the old one and use the Fox40 only when needed / windy ?...in other words, can I inter-mingle whistles, as needed, or will the pitch difference confuse her ?
     
  2. EvanG

    EvanG Elite Refuge Member

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    First, at 7 months of age no dog is in their prime, and won't be for another two years. Pups remain pups until around a year old, and you don't really know yet how the mature dog will handle the heat. But you can expect any of them to react to this kind of heat that way.

    If you can do water work, do that instead of land for now. The dog will get used to whatever whistle you use. I prefer a whistle with a cork pea, like a Roy Gonia Special.

    EvanG
     
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  3. Rick Hall

    Rick Hall Elite Refuge Member

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    Might want to consider the information re: diet and heat in this article: http://news.cornell.edu/stories/2013/03/more-fat-less-protein-improves-detection-dogs-sniffers

    While Evan's right about Pup getting used to whatever whistle you use (just layer it with voice commands for a while), you might also want to consider whether that Fox 40 with un-baffled side exhaust toward your ears is really a downrange improvement over what you've been using. May or may not be...
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2017
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  4. Il. MudDuk

    Il. MudDuk Elite Refuge Member

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    Thank you both.
    As luck would have it, I got access to a nearby pond I didnt know existed and we did some water work ( shade trees around, a decent breeze and luckily doesnt feel like 105 degrees yet ).

    The reason I asked about both whistles, a local lake is prone to wind and waves and I dont know that she heard the "old" pea whistle on some days when it was windy...maybe she did, but I kept the retrieves short as she is far from finished and I am working slowly with her. Basically, I dont want duck season to arrive, if shes even ready for it, only to not hear the old pea whistle on a windy day (per my searches on this website and the Fox40 webpage, the 40 is supposed to be loud and audible on windy days). And, since there is such a contrast in pitch between the two whistles, I didnt know what to expect or what she would or wouldnt react to.

    Yea, "in her prime" may not have been the best choice of words, I was just saying that she is young & healthy but just doesnt seem as heat tolerant as the last two dogs even when its not what I would consider "hot" ( last two dogs were a yellow male who hunted, and a female chessie/lab mix who didnt hunt but loved the water).
     
  5. Timber Hole

    Timber Hole Senior Refuge Member

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    I have a 1 1/2 year old Chocolate. She is my first lab. I have also been surprised how quickly she heats up. She goes hard and gives everything she's got on every retrieve. The downside of this is that she heats very, very quickly.
     
  6. FieldLabLover

    FieldLabLover Elite Refuge Member

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    <<Its going to be 105 here today so this mornings training session ended after 10 minutes of retrieving bumpers and a goose wing in the yard ( no water retrieves ). >>

    10 min is way too much retrieving especially at 105 degrees and high humidity. When the tongue starts hanging quit! Over heating is next and collapse. Most people only train in early morning when it's that hot.
     
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  7. CA Birdman

    CA Birdman Elite Refuge Member

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    It gets fairly warm even in the mornings out here even in the mornings. She can do 3 miles on the bike easier than running drills in same amount of time. Always have plenty of water. Night training is usually 1 or 2 lining bumpers then water retrieves.

    7 months do have their endurance and full development. Even with water training based on what I have read, for a pup at that age 10 minutes or so is the suggested limit. Remember your pup is not fully grown and muscles and tendons and everything else are still growing, have play etc. that will tighten up as physically develop.
     
  8. Rick Hall

    Rick Hall Elite Refuge Member

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    Fwiw, I carry two whistles: one a quiet (to our ears) little ACME 212 that many of us in this country think of as a close working British spaniel whistle (but that dogs respond to at surprising-to-me distances unless well upwind in running water), the other Fox 40's Sonic Blast model that will hurt you and everyone nearby if you hit it really hard without first cupping it megaphone-like with your hands. They could hardly be more different, yet work equally well in the situations calling for them, even though the quiet one sees the overwhelming majority of our daily use.

    (Might add that I also carry a herding dog whistle on the same string to mess with the fulvous and black-bellied whistling ducks that summer here, as it mimics their many tones well. It's ignored almost completely despite sometimes similar cadence or inflection, presumably because it's not associated with training. But let me blow it in the blind and watch the ears and eyes rise. Dogs are pretty sharp about such things.)

    Four of my Chesapeakes have been of similar "dead grass" color, but their tolerance of our Louisiana summers has varied greatly. Here, we must even be cautious about working dogs in water which may be soupy hot. Big thing is to have a plan that helps us get the most good out of the short periods they can do real work without overheating - or train in the rain.
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2017
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  9. Il. MudDuk

    Il. MudDuk Elite Refuge Member

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    Maybe I wasnt clear or didnt write exactly what I wanted to say with clarity....

    We went out in the yard at 8am local time....still cool enough out but the heat was indeed coming ( its here now, thus why I am in the house with the dog watching the ball game ). When we went to the local pond I found earlier, it was getting warm but the shade trees etc made for a fun, albeit short, trip. Most of it was just getting to know the pond, any snags, talking with the owner of the pond, etc. Mostly, the pup was allowed to "play" in the water at her leisure vs. a bonifide work/training regimen, though bumpers and a goose wing were thrown for her.

    Yes, once her tongue starts to hang, we done. Its just that it seems to "hang" quicker than what I would expect when its not overly warm out. She's our baby so no mistreatment/hard work outs/over doing it will ever happen here.

    Mr. Hall, I can only imagine what that Louisiana heat, coupled with gators and skeeters is like. Well, I CAN imagine it, and to that I say " No thanks ".

    Thanks to all for the replies.
     
  10. Doc E

    Doc E Elite Refuge Member Sponsor

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    Both young (up to age two) and geriatric dogs (age 8 and up) don't have the greatest thermoregulation.
    With impeded thermoregulation, the young and the old get cold easier and they get hot easier.
    .
     

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