A keystone cop and his food plots –

Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by KSU86, Jun 6, 2017.

  1. KSU86

    KSU86 Senior Refuge Member

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    I manage a property in a flyover state and it’s been a challenging spring. Ample rainfall has jazzed cattail and spike rush throughout. I decided to pursue a much more aggressive disking operation, and had acquired a larger tractor to accommodate. My old disk was apparently built for the “weekend farmer” and spewed disks like buttons off a cheap shirt under the pulling power of the larger tractor. A larger, heavy duty disk now on order & replacement disks also purchased. During disk downtime, I decided to bushhog additional areas, as they dry. During bushhog “disconnect” operation, I forgot to unhook the pto shaft and pulled forward and then while backing up to hook up another attachment, bent the pto shaft in the ground.. Off to the dealer to acquire a replacement shaft.

    This food plot “master baiter” as some on this forum would call me needs to wise up, or will go broke in the learning process
     
  2. Porter Bayou

    Porter Bayou Senior Refuge Member

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    Mississippi
    You may know this already, but a little FYI if you don't. Cattail reproduces by both seed and root rhizome. Disking is not a practice I would recommend for control of cattail. Disking will spread those rhizomes.
     
  3. H20DAD

    H20DAD Elite Refuge Member

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    If there is a way to kill those things, I'd love to know because both the fwc and sfwmd deny any knowledge of being able to stop them and just keep spreading them.

    The only thing that I have seen to beat them back is fire when they are on solidly dry land so the roots burn back also.

    And the state of Florida pretty much refuses to burn anything these days.
     
  4. KSU86

    KSU86 Senior Refuge Member

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    My experience - Disk deep, drying out the roots..then hit 'em with glyphosate. I haven't found the perfect/permanent solution
     
  5. Porter Bayou

    Porter Bayou Senior Refuge Member

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    I haven't found a permanent solution. Best method I've found is a prolonged drought. Best results I've ever had was on a 2 ac inpoundment that was about 1/4 covered in cattails. Client disked one fall in an attempt to eliminate them. We had a mild winter followed by a wet spring and they took over the entire inpoundment. We did not hold water in that inpoundment for the next 3 years. I had the client keep the inpoundment mowed during the spring and early summer. In July we subsoiled the unit exposing the roots and drying them out. We applied rodeo every fall a week or two before the first frost. After 3 years we had pretty much eliminated the cattails to the point that he could keep them under control by just pulling the few plants that would pop up in the spring. I was fortunate that the client was a farmer and had the necessary equipment and labor to do this. Most of the landowners I work with don't have these capabilities. For the average landowner I recommend keeping the area as dry as you can as long as you can. Keep them mowed and apply a fall herbicide treatment. If you have no control of the water, about all you can do is try to keep them in check with herbicide treatments.
     
    JFG likes this.
  6. JFG

    JFG Elite Refuge Member

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    Spraying glyphosate on them and then re spraying until you knock them out has worked well for me. I did the same for the phragmites (which spread by rhizome's too) and if you'll stay on top of them you can eradicate most of them. Took two growing seasons to do a thorough job.
     
    WHUP ! Hen likes this.
  7. Clayton

    Clayton Moderator Moderator

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    Here you all are trying to kill cattail and I am trying to grow it! LOL
    Mine is for totally different reasons. I am trying to create king rail nesting habitat. I dig it up in areas I don't want it and relocate to areas I do. At best I get 50% survival and it is slow to spread for the first several years.
     
  8. KSU86

    KSU86 Senior Refuge Member

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    You hit it right on - I have 4 segregated pools, feed by a small creek. The pools that dry out completely can be managed by alternating disk years and chemical treatment. One of the pools elevation was mistakenly cut 12 inches too deep - drying out this pool is impossible unless extreme drought. I call this the "Haunted pool". Quick sand/marsh ooze swallows tractors and we've nearly lost close friends (spot spraying) here.
     
  9. KSU86

    KSU86 Senior Refuge Member

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    kansas
    A cattail spreader??? keep that on the down-low -I don't want any angry "marsh managers" to show up at your door.
    Glad to have you back knowledge sharing - we need you healthy and appreciate you.
     
    Clayton likes this.

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