$/acre

Discussion in 'Arkansas Flyway Forum' started by yogi, Mar 15, 2017.

  1. TheDuckSlayer

    TheDuckSlayer Elite Refuge Member

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    Hence why Ark green timber costs 10000 per acre and hunting in Canada is free
     
  2. bang you'r dead

    bang you'r dead Canada Forum Mod. Eh! Moderator Flyway Manager

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    I guess I won't tell you about the flooded timber hunting we do in Canada either.....and its still for free. I found a series of beaver dams, that back flooded probably a mile or more of timber, mainly birch and oaks, and some poplar, and the access was through a wild rice area. I knocked probably 300 lbs of rice into the canoes and spread it in the flooded timber areas. The open areas developed into nice wild rice patches but the heavier forested areas remained fairly free of the rice, but had other feed in it. After about 3 years, it was amazing. I shot limit after limit in those ponds, and I had the choice of hunting in the wild rice areas or the heavy timber areas. The trees in the first pond died , but left enough to lean against when the ducks poured into the rice. Mallards were the main birds, but we got lots of puddle ducks and wood ducks were a special treat. Flooded timber...mallards....private (mainly because no on else knew about it)land......but still for free. If I spent 50 million on a duck place, I would have to justify it as being "special". For that money, I'll be hunting New Zealand, Argentina, Nicaragua, Iceland, Scotland, and still have enough left over for a new Holland & Holland bespoke every year.
     
  3. bang you'r dead

    bang you'r dead Canada Forum Mod. Eh! Moderator Flyway Manager

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    Best day last fall for me was 50 snow geese, 4 mallards, 4 pintails, and 4 Canada geese. That's 62 birds. I'm not sure I could do that in the timber either.
     
  4. getemshug

    getemshug Senior Refuge Member

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    you might ought to shut your pie hole or we will figure that s*** out and you will be overrun.....bet that
     
  5. bill cooksey

    bill cooksey Elite Refuge Member

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    I've hunted "timber" in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and North Dakota. It's not the same thing, bang. No insult intended, but you really don't know what you're talking about.
     
  6. bang you'r dead

    bang you'r dead Canada Forum Mod. Eh! Moderator Flyway Manager

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    Yeah, I've had a few invites to come down and try it, but I could never seem to get the timing right. A southern flooded timber hunt for mallards would be something special. I'll put it on the bucket list. I still don't know if I could hunt in one spot all season long. I really seem to prefer to hunt different areas by different methods for different ducks. This season, I hunted from my boat, canoe, kayak, pass shot on a dike, pass shot off a road (non-maintained and legal), hunted marsh, hunted rice, hunted big water for divers, hunted fields in layout blinds, willow blinds, out of my kayak, laid in a ditch, and jump shot some roosting ponds. I think I shot 16 or 17 different species of waterfowl and I like the variety of hunting we have access to. It does take some specialized equipment. I own two duck "boat", three canoes, two kayaks, five layout blinds, decoy trailers, and hundreds, if not more than a thousand decoys of every size, shape and species.
     
  7. bill cooksey

    bill cooksey Elite Refuge Member

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    I understand. I truly do. Not saying you're wrong, because people enjoy different things. I know men down here who feel the same way. But, that timber really gets under the skin of a lot of folks. By the way, tagging along and shooting will be a good time, but you may miss some of what makes it so special.
     
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  8. stevena198301

    stevena198301 Elite Refuge Member

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    It is! And even more so, seeing that many mallards pouring into PUBLIC land. It doesn't happen all the time (and seems to be less and less for me these days), but hundreds of mallards falling in to thick timber is a sight... Even if you don't shoot.
     
  9. bang you'r dead

    bang you'r dead Canada Forum Mod. Eh! Moderator Flyway Manager

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    It's not all about the shooting. I understand that. I've hunted with some TN boys who loved to make breakfast in the blind, and it was part of their tradition that wasn't going to change just because they were up in Canada. Cooking breakfast for 3 guys in a 17 foot jon boat was something I enjoyed watching and eating.
     
  10. bill cooksey

    bill cooksey Elite Refuge Member

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    Cooking in the blind is definitely a TN tradition, and it's one I still enjoy as often as possible. As to shooting, the most pressured public area in the country is a specific AR WMA. It's pretty much a mallard deal, and the mallard limit is three on that area whereas the rest of the state is four. There are plenty of other places in the region to shoot ducks, and I'd wager the average in that WMA is less than one-per-man each day, but they keep lining up.
     

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