All dying a slow death...hunting, golf and the Republican Party

Discussion in 'Political Action Forum' started by takemrarely, Dec 24, 2017.

  1. bang you'r dead

    bang you'r dead Canada Forum Mod. Eh! Moderator Flyway Manager

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    My son has a three year technical degree in mechanical engineering, and in less than a year has moved himself up within the company he works for as a project manager. He has dedicated clients throughout the states and now around the world. He is on a team that is integrating new software and hardware in the company, and has had two promotions in the 10 months he has been with them. The grads from his college are sought after for their technical and hands-on experience and real-world knowledge. It was a perfect fit for him, and he still has the option to go back to school and upgrade to a university degree if he wishes, but I think he has found his home.

    Good technical schools supply extremely good employees.
     
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  2. Bear

    Bear Elite Refuge Member

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    I sincerely believe that for any four year engineering degree a semester minimum should be spent on turning wrenches and pouring concrete.

    Not just the lecture/labs but pulling engines and transmissions...breaking them down and reassemblying them and tying rebar and building forms.

    The sounds...the smells...the singing of the hammers and sliding of the shovels can teach more and help more than theory alone.

    Haliburton, when they hired new engineers, used to make them spend something like three or four months on a drilling rig. Don't know if they still do it but I know they did
     
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  3. bang you'r dead

    bang you'r dead Canada Forum Mod. Eh! Moderator Flyway Manager

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    My dad was a superintendent for the trades in a paper mill, and he was a red seal carpenter by trade (journeyman), and the engineers would constantly be consulting him on how to build something, or how to design something that would work, efficiently and at a minimum cost. Dad was forever grumbling that the engineers would always "over-engineer" anything , and that he would be refining designs and calculating loads to save the company a lot of money. I can remember when the mill hired a new engineer that would never listen to Dad, and my father didn't mind, but he would comment casually when he thought something was really not going to work. The best one was the reinforcements that were being designed for the burner at the woodroom. The bark and scrap wood pieces were burnt in a huge furnace that looked similar to this...
    [​IMG] The exterior panels were coming a bit loose, and the engineer decided that the best way to keep them tight was to put steel bands around the burner, which were tightened and bolted together with huge hardened steel bolts and nuts. I think there were around 40 bands around the circumference from base to top of the burner. The work was completed and the burner put back into use. Dad looked at it and said, "Don't park the car anywhere down by the burner in the next couple of days if you are working in the woodroom". I didn't think much about it , until about 4 in the morning the next day, when I heard what sounded like a cannon going off, which woke me up, then I heard a few more in succession . I put my clothes on, and went outside. Turns out that the burner, which was brick lined, expanded quite a bit when heated up for a day or so, and those bands didn't expand at the same rate, and the bolts were exploding under the pressure that was generated . My dad came outside at watched with me as band after band exploded open . The engineer hadn't calculated the heat expansion of the structure , or thought that the steel bolts would hold under pressure. He screwed up a couple other projects in the next year and was gone.

    Just because you don't have a university degree does not mean you are not intelligent, or can't solve problems. Some of the brightest people I know never went to college or university, and are quite successful in their careers.
     
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  4. Bear

    Bear Elite Refuge Member

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    @bang you'r dead Nice...I'll take more time later to appreciate your most recent post. :tu
     
  5. OneShotBandit

    OneShotBandit Elite Refuge Member

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    I use to work for a Union Mechanical Contractors company (Engineering/Drafting) and I ask one of the union plumbers about why there wasn't many or any Union home builders....he replied straight faced: you/I wouldn't be able to afford a new home.
     
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  6. OneShotBandit

    OneShotBandit Elite Refuge Member

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    The Company I worked for tried this with me-going out with the Fire Protection crew to just hand pipe, be a "gopher," but the Union would not allow it- they said an apprentince should be hired. It would have made my (Fire Protection design) and the field hands job a lot easier when I can understand how pipe was installed. Now after I write this the Field Superintendent was later able go with me to do field surveys and that really helped when I went back to the drafting board. There is no experience like hands on experience.
     
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  7. Bear

    Bear Elite Refuge Member

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    :tu

    Some philosopher is supposed to have said something along the lines that "Experience is the one thing a person can't buy."
     
  8. Ryen Crichlow

    Ryen Crichlow Senior Refuge Member

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    Yeah, there was a story with a lot of data in Outdoor Life this month. The numbers do not look good for hunters.

    Hunting is becoming cosplay for a certain type of person. Heck, I saw a show on the teevee last time I was stateside that showed a "fishing tournament" where guys were prancing around with shirts with a bunch of sponsor's names on them. Sad.
     

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