All the ducks are in LA

Discussion in 'Louisiana Flyway Forum' started by Swampfoot, Jan 9, 2018.

  1. JP

    JP Elite Refuge Member

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    Short stopping isn't the same as back in the 60's & 70's when water was kept artificially open by state agencies and bait was also placed for the birds as well.

    Today, drive up through the plains states and you will observe bazillions of acres of grain. Warm water discharge from power plants along with a trend of milder winters has also been a factor in migration changes.

    Ed is spot on with his comments on mallards in Kansas along with the post on mallard limits east of KC. Why?

    Look at where the snow line is located. If they cannot get to the grain, they will fly to where the snow isn't.

    If you are a traveling waterfowler, the snow line should be your primary destination point. If you are a stay at home waterfowler and are looking at empty skies, the snow line is why.
     
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  2. bang you'r dead

    bang you'r dead Canada Forum Mod. Eh! Moderator Flyway Manager

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    Well said. Ducks will not move if they can find food, open water, and low hunt pressure. Last year, we had huntable mallards in northern Manitoba all the way into Dec. Its not rocket science. All those private clubs up and down the flyway are feeding them more, once their season is finished.
     
  3. theduckguru

    theduckguru Elite Refuge Member

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    Flooded corn fields don’t short stop ducks. Open water and no snow short stop ducks.
     
  4. dannyduck

    dannyduck New Member

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    Kansas City sits on the Missouri-Kansas state line. East of K.C. is Missouri. Missouri season has been closed for awhile now.
     
  5. JP

    JP Elite Refuge Member

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  6. ducaholic

    ducaholic Elite Refuge Member

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    Correction SW of Kansas City
     
  7. Greenhedges

    Greenhedges Elite Refuge Member

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  8. bill cooksey

    bill cooksey Elite Refuge Member

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    It's not talked about enough, but those fronts came too late. Some populations of ducks migrate on the calendar, but many more migrate based on weather. As long as weather allows them to have food and water, they stick. Now, back to it coming too late; those birds are geared also to push north as soon as possible after Christmas. In AR, TN and MS, reverse migration is just as big a deal as the migration south. December was very stable, there were no fronts to push birds, and they just sat and ate wherever they happened to be. When those two blasts locked things up, the ducks were in great physical condition, so they rode it out. The rivers and big water were open to roost, and they could fly out and find feed on sunny afternoons. Also, there was enough of a warm spell between the fronts to thaw things all the way out. Had the second hit prior to thaw, it might have stressed them enough to trigger a migration south, but it didn't happen.

    We need regular cold fronts in December to push and stress the ducks while they aren't geared to head back to the breeding grounds.
     
  9. ducaholic

    ducaholic Elite Refuge Member

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    We got two good arctic fronts during the 12 day split in early between Dec. 4th and Dec. 15th. That weather scenario is pretty typical for that time frame. Now mind you they are not as intense as the blast that come later but it is arctic air pushing all the way thru Louisiana nonetheless. In the East Zone we simply didn't have the water the hold em so they flew to the coast. I saw more ducks in the air for the two January blasts that locked things up than I have seen in several years but once again we did not have normal naturally occurring seasonal backwater to keep them around. As soon as it thawed they disappeared. As for the reverse migration as far as I can tell it never happened. The backwater lakes normally load up in the last two weeks in January. That didn't happen this year. Perhaps the timing of the last blast screwed that up. I dunno???
     
  10. bill cooksey

    bill cooksey Elite Refuge Member

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    You are right in that we had two fronts, but, unless they are extreme, two fronts a month aren't going make for a big push. We need regular fronts, and we didn't have them. Those two left Baton Rouge and Memphis with similar temps. The big freeze definitely pushed birds around, but it didn't necessarily push them south. It just sent them to open water.

    You are also right about the lack of a reverse migration. When things thawed, a lot of ducks just moved back from the cold weather roost to the spots they were in prior. The best hunts I had all season were the first nine days and during the freeze, and the freeze was the best of all.
     

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