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Anyone know anyhting about AeroMarine?

Discussion in 'Boats, Blinds, & Gadgets Forum' started by num70, Jan 16, 2006.

  1. num70

    num70 Elite Refuge Member

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    Hello everyone,

    I have been using a 1981 Aeromarine for all of this season. Bought it on the side of the road last summer. It's a Glass barnegat sneakbox and so far it's the best boat I've ever owned. Supposedly they were made by a guy out on long island somewhere. Does anyone happen to know anything about these boats or own one? I gues they were made for seaduckin on the sound and bays. I'd appreciate any information that you might have. Thanks very much.
     
  2. arrowhawk

    arrowhawk Elite Refuge Member

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    Aero is a small boatyard in Harbor Island on long Island the phone # is 516-431-5061 the lateTom Pryer was the owner now his son John has the boatyard.If you look on a map it is located the South West part of long Ilsand near long Beach.Tom was a fighter pilot from ww two hence the name areo, as aroe dymanic. Tom owned the boat yard and did fiberglass repairs as such. He was an avid duck hunter and wanted a fiberglass barneget, there were none around so he built his own. I first found out about the boats in 1979 when I read an article in outdoor life november 1979 artice on David hagerbaumer. David loved the barnegnet from the east and brought them west.I went to the boatyard to inquire about the barnegnet and he show me the boats and the boat he was building for Daves son inlaw. The price of the boat was $1200, at the time to rich for my blood. FYI David Hagerbaumer did not pay for his boats he traded his art for the duckboats.
    The boat was built from a wood boat sailing hull that was over 100years old from barneget bay NJ.There are a couple of models the orignal bottom was a displacment hull one man cockpit.
    They improved on the bottom to take a larger outboard by adding filler to the mold and flattening out the bottom.
    They stopped building boats in the late 80's when the EPA shut them down for not having the proper air pollution booths.
    The major use of the boats were for shallow water bays. One man could pull the boat accross the mud flats.
    I have the newer style 2 man boat and I have to aggre it is a great boat. It can handle rough water, It hides well, rows and push poles like a dream.The best part about the boat is that in can be pulled off the mud flats by one man. I have run mine with a 25 and the boat flew. I now run a 18 but have also run it with a 9.9 which is all that is needed.
     
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  3. num70

    num70 Elite Refuge Member

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    Wow. That's exactly the type of info that I was looking for. Thanks very much. I had found the boatyeard and left several messages there but no one ever answered or called me back. I have the one man with a 9.9 on it and it goes just fine. Could probably handle more but I'm not in a hurry. I'm so impressed with the way the thing is deisgned and built. It's been used (really used) for 25 years and it looks great. I have lots of ideas for off season modifications (blind boards and the like). Thanks again for the info. I like to know the history of what I'm using.
     
  4. arrowhawk

    arrowhawk Elite Refuge Member

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    Do you have the model that the oarlock and decoy racks are riveted on? That was one of the earlyer models.
    One other thing there early adds showed his son driving the boat when the cockpit was filled with water. To show that the boat had level floatation not just floatation. FYI his son could care less about the duckboats . He was not a duck hunter. The boatyard is a one man operation so if you call about this time of year they may be on vacation.
     
  5. num70

    num70 Elite Refuge Member

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    Yes. The oarlocks are riveted on, but there was nothing there I'd call a decoy rack. There were a couple of shelves on the inside of the cockpit, just wide enough to hold some boxes of shelves. They were not riveted in, but rather glassed in (or epoxied in). They may have been added afterward. Difficult to tell. There are small, screwed-on brass tie-downs surrounding the perimeter. It also came with Batten boards. Look like 3/4 ply. Each had two hinges holding them on. Very strange design. Had a circular hole through them. Looks like they were made to be grassed up as a sort of a pop-up blind. In addition, there is a piece of 1/2" ply inside on two hinges, that is meant to be flipped to other way to lay-out. More comfortable on the back. Which it is, surprisingly. It has a big metal handle on the front of the bow used for just about everyhting, dragging on the mud, trailering, etc. With the motor, I can still pull it across the mud, but it is heavy, to be sure.
     
  6. arrowhawk

    arrowhawk Elite Refuge Member

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    The shelf on the inside were not add on but an option and they were glassed in . The 3/4 marine plywood with the 2 1/2 inch holes were to are the decoy racks they go on the aft decks the holes were drilled in to reduce the weight. There should also be 2 more handles in the back of the boat. fyi they are stanley garage door handles if you ever need to replace them.
     
  7. num70

    num70 Elite Refuge Member

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    there are, indeed two more handles on the back. I'm glad that someone knows these boats. No one up in my neck of the woods knows anyhting about them. Do you have any ideas as to the number of them that were made?
     
  8. arrowhawk

    arrowhawk Elite Refuge Member

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    When Tom was alive I asked him that same question. He told me they made a couple a year some years more that others."Duckhunter are cheap they do not want to spend money on a quality boat" .They made them to order so if you wanted a boat they waited till they could mold several then fit them to your order. Most of the time they had one new one lying around around. If you like the way it was outfitted it could be yours. Tom told me he did not build the boat to make money he built them because he enjoyed building boats. Spring, fall and most of the summer was spent on running the boatyard.
    Did you have your boat out in any weather yet? It is amasing how well it handles in a snotty chop.
     
  9. num70

    num70 Elite Refuge Member

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    Yes. I had it out in some nasty conditions this past weekend. I handles perfectly. The thing about it is, I'm not a small guy. I'm 6'7" and ~ 280 lbs. The boat is designed so well, that I can sit all the way back on top of the transom and drive around without taking any water whatsoever. I've never had a small boat that I could do that with. The boat is only rated for 350 (i think) and I've had 600 lbs in it like it was nothing. Too bad Tom is no longer with us, i would certainly have liked to have spoken with him.
     
  10. Dog tired

    Dog tired Refuge Member

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    Dug up from long lost history in a search. Im going to be looking at one of these in CT this week or next that i found on craigslist. Looks like a cool design and i cant get over the barneget sneak style after owning one. Shouldve never sold mine. Will post pictures if the deal goes through.
     

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