Armyworms

Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by Plainsman04, Jul 29, 2014.

  1. Plainsman04

    Plainsman04 Senior Refuge Member

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    So the armyworms got my milo...as in pretty much all 12 ac or so I had planted. There's probably 1/2-3/4 ac in 1 of the 2 ponds that will survive. The rest of it is toast. Found a couple plants in the bigger pond that looked ok and looked down in the whorl of one and he was still in there. Talked to a couple people this week that are just eat up with them this year. One guy said he's sprayed his hayfields twice already.

    Plan was to get the milo up and then spray with 2,4 d to control broadleafs. As expected it is eat up with sesbania, sicklepod, and a little morning glory or something that looks like it. There's a lot of nutgrass, some scattered panicum, crabgrass, and what I think maybe foxtail coming up in some patches. I had already planned to fill in gaps and some areas that didn't get milo with browntop.

    Question is, what should I do next? The armyworms are still there. They've eaten some nutgrass and foxtail (or at least that's what I think it is) and they're even attacking the sesbania in some spots. I've got to get rid of the sesbania and sicklepod or it'll completely take over. I know that from past experience. There are 10's of thousands of stems per acre. Should I still spray for armyworms or just let it go? And if I should spray for armyworms should I do that before or after I spray 2,4 d? I would still like to plant some millet and I've got probably 3 more weeks or so to plant, but would prefer sometime in the next 10-14 days. I need to spray 2,4 d PDQ or the sesbania is really gonna jump and be hard to kill.
     
  2. cootmeurer

    cootmeurer Elite Refuge Member

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    Just a thought - bush hog, plow down, replant with buckwheat - should give you seed well before frost. 2,4-D will nail the buckwheat, so maybe after bush hogging allow a short regrowth and then spray round up
     
  3. Clayton

    Clayton Elite Refuge Member

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    What to do is just a matter of opinion. Personally I would get the armyworms under control, spray with 2,4-D and then fill in the gaps with browntop as needed.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2014
  4. Crow Creek

    Crow Creek Refuge Member

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    Liquid Sevin (available at the co-op) should kill the army worms. You need to try and kill them before you do anything else. You should have plenty of time to replant Jap Millet. Just keep close watch on it or the army worms can decimate a great stand overnight.
     
  5. TUGREENHEADHUNTER

    TUGREENHEADHUNTER Senior Refuge Member

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    Being from Alabama you might be able to plant it again. Not sure when your first frost is but I would bet it is like ours here in OK. I planted some last year about this time and had great success. Some milo has a short growing season. You would have to get on it though. Just a thought.
     
  6. Plainsman04

    Plainsman04 Senior Refuge Member

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    I think I'm going to go with this after looking at it again this afternoon. Some of the milo looks like it might recover from the armyworm invasion but 97% of it is gone. I've still got worms pretty heavy in one pond but it appears they've moved on from the other. They're right next to each other so I think I'm going to try to spray both for worms, then spray some 2,4 d for the sea of sesbania, and then see what I've got. Looks like under some of it there's some panicum, barnyard grass, and maybe some volunteer jap millet from previous years trying to come up...if the worms don't get it too bad before I can spray in the next day or two. I should be able to get millet planted by the 15th...I hope.

    One more question, I'm probably going to end up spraying Intrepid 2F for the armyworms, maybe liquid sevin but probably Intrepid. Guy at the Feed & Seed said 4 oz./ac. Question is, can I mix it with the 2,4 d amine so I only have to make one pass over each field, or do I have to spray them separately? I've never mixed insecticide and herbicide before. Just a thought.

    Here's a couple pics from this afternoon:
    [​IMG]

    Any idea what this is? I think maybe barnyard or millet? Maybe panicum?
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2014
  7. Clayton

    Clayton Elite Refuge Member

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    I have never tried mixing the two.

    Good lord that is one bad patch of sesbania. I spray about 50 - 100 acres of it a year but most is scattered with occasional bad patches. Often not that dense but close enough together than broadcast spraying is the only way to go.

    I am pretty sure I can see the characteristic flat stem of barnyardgrass, aka wild millet, in those pictures. The 2,4-D spraying should do a great job of releasing once the competition is removed, as long as the moisture is present. We have been bad dry here for a while so I have only had one field that has released. The others will once we get some decent rain. The one field I have released was 90% broadleafs and 10% grasses. It is now about 70% grasses and the rest broadleafs. I left the Bidens and smartweed patches. What I sprayed was sumpweed, sesbania and pigweed.
     
  8. JFG

    JFG Elite Refuge Member

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    I had never really given much though to army worms or insects invading my second year m-s unit, I was more concerned getting the soils right so it could start establishing vegetative growth. Planted some Jap last year but soon after coming up leaves stated browning and the millet just didn't grow much. Attributed that to poor soil and too much rain. Fast forwarding to this year, we see a much improved Jap millet planting but still notice the browning and slow growth in many areas. This time I think it got too much rain that topped it for too long. Well, after walking around and looking at it, we notice a caterpillar on a stalk. It's only when we look more closely do we see more .... and more ... and more! All sizes too. And everywhere. So we have them identified as fall armyworms (not armyworms). Now I know what the problem has been all along. So I hired a guy to spray them yesterday using "Steward" which should take care of quite a few varieties.

    It's topics like these are very helpful. I might not have realized what and/or just how bad a problem I had if it had not been for this thread.
     
  9. WHUP ! Hen

    WHUP ! Hen Elite Refuge Member

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    Spraying an insecticide and herbicide mixed together is done over thousands and thousands of acres every year, not a problem.
     
  10. Plainsman04

    Plainsman04 Senior Refuge Member

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    Glad it could help somebody else! Seems like so many threads on boards these days are less than helpful. Good luck with your place!

    I did end up mixing some of the 2 together. I sprayed a little with it mixed where I saw lots of worms and then in other areas I found no worms and sprayed just 2,4 d. Main reason I didn't spray all of it with both is cost as well as I just didn't think it needed it. It seems to have worked great mixing the 2 together. My sesbania has grown so big that I'm having to touch up several areas and put out a heavier rate than I would like to kill it. Knock on wood, but the armyworms are gone for now. I sprayed and went back out 2 days later and they were toast. I hope they stay gone. The barnyard grass and jap millet that had sprouted is responding very well and some of the milo that was left has responded well too. Still probably only have 1.5-2 acres left at the most. I won't have a great amount of food but once the sesbania finishes dying back a little more I'll try to spread some browntop next week in some shallower areas and I should have something to work with. Thanks for your help!
     

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