Basic Gun Dog/Reasonable time frame?

Discussion in 'Gun Dog Forum' started by DroberF16, Jan 1, 2004.

  1. DroberF16

    DroberF16 Refuge Member

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    Does anyone have a basic time frame in mind for basic gun dog training. I realize that every dog is different and there are a ton of variables, but is 3 months too short or 6 months too long for a trainer that this is their full-time/professional job. Any ideas? Talking basic gun dog that is FF and steady, working multiple marks, no blinds, from a dog that is not from a tremendous pedigree but very trainable with a reasonable amount of "retrieving desire".

    Thanks in advance!

    Cheers
    Dave
     
  2. CUPTDUCK

    CUPTDUCK Senior Refuge Member

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    Thats a tough question. I will say though, that there is a big difference between good in training and good in the blind. I would say that in six months a decent trainer with a decent dog, would have the dog ready to be taken on a hunt, but the work would be far from over and I wouldnt too expect much. Alot of people think when they pick their dog up from the trainer after 6 months or so they are ready to go hunting, when in fact it can often take a few years to develope a truly reliable gun dog. :)
     
  3. DroberF16

    DroberF16 Refuge Member

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    Thanks for the reply!!! Anyone else, anything to add???



    Dave
     
  4. EvanG

    EvanG Elite Refuge Member

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    1. The terms are too general to be defined by time.

    2. No dog should be held to a schedule.

    Now that I've said that, please don't think that's what I believe you're really after. It's just that, as a pro trainer the most common question - and the least answerable - was "How long does it take to train a dog?"

    The better question might be, "How much time are you willing to devote to a quality training base for your dog?"

    EvanG
     
  5. DroberF16

    DroberF16 Refuge Member

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    Your point is so well taken, I understand where you are coming from. The underlying theme of my question is that I have some hunting buddies that have had their dogs trained by some amateur trainers and recieved a workable dog in a relatively short time frame, i.e. 3 to 5 months.

    Now saying this I realize that the product is only as good as the foundation!!! These "shorter time-frame" gun dogs still have their short comings, and all dogs are a work in progress in my mind. I personally opted to go to a full-time trainer who makes this his living and sees all different types of dogs day in day out and who I felt from word of mouth and personal research would be the best for myself and my dog. Which dont get me wrong, so far a very pleasurable experience and I have full confidence in the trainers capabilities.

    However, last month of the season my buddies are asking about my dog and the continuing answer is perhaps..., well..., maybe..., in January, I dropped the dog off in early/mid August.

    I have been paying what I feel is a premium price for his training, and completely understand that my expectations of my dog may have been somewhat lofty.

    My question is what is reasonable?

    I tried to put myself in the trainers shoes. I have this guy paying me umpty ump bucks per month, the money is steady, hell I'm gonna stretch this thing out as long as I can....??? No need in running off a meal ticket.

    Now obviously any "wool over the eyes" would not benifit either party for the long run and I am by no way saying that this is the case.

    Sorry for the long post. This being my first dog I am just a little more than anxious to get him back and want to make sure I am no being mislead or misleading myself in my expectations!!!

    Cheers Fellas
    Thanks for the replies!

    Dave
     
  6. swamprat II

    swamprat II Elite Refuge Member

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    Have you been to see the dog and the progress he has made? I am also a semi-pro trainer myself. I keep a small kennels and train anywhere from 2 to 7 dogs at a time. I try to involve my clients as much as possible with the training. It seems to help with the client seeing their dog make progress, helps train the client as to how to run the dog properly, and helps bond the dog better with the client.

    But it will generaly take me a month or so longer to train a dog to the clients desired level of work than a full time trainer, simply becuase of my avaliable training time.

    If you are worried about the progress of your dog go see him/her work. If the trainer is a good trainer he/she won't mind a bit.

    I must second EvanG's post as well.
     
  7. dixidawg

    dixidawg Senior Refuge Member

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    I saw this response to the question of how long it takes to train a dawg. Can't. remember where I saw it, but it stuck with me.


    "How long does it take to train a dawg?"

    About as long as it takes to catch a big fish.

    Bob
     
  8. DroberF16

    DroberF16 Refuge Member

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    I have only been able to go and see my dogs progress once during his training and he performed very well and did everything that was asked of him for sure. Trainers location is a significant drive from my locale, this was a factor but I did not locate anyone that came with a higher reccomendation that was located any closer. My dog was about 1yr and 2 months old when we took him to training and he has been very missed by my family and we are looking forward to getting him back as a family pet as well as a basic gun dog.

    My set of personal circumstances did not allow me to do the dog proper justice trying to do the training myself due to limited time at home due to work (about half the month on the road), realizing this I felt was the first step. I felt by seeking a professional that I could get the level of training needed from someone who could tell me if this just wasn't the dog.

    I speak with the trainer on at least a bi-weekly basis to check on his progress and all has seemed positive. Trainer says his desire warrants continued training, I was very up front that if this dog cannot make a hunting dog let me have him back because he is a great pet and I will use training bucks toward a dog with more potential if he is not the one.

    Cheers fellas
    Dave
     
  9. rbr

    rbr Elite Refuge Member

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    Droberf16, I would ask the trainer to explain in
    detail the step by step program he is using and
    have him recomend any lit. about his methods
    so you can better understnd what is going on.
    Communication between trainer and owner
    is key.

    Also, even though a break in the process will
    undoubtedly cause set backs their is no reason
    that you couldn't take your dog home and hunt him
    then return him after the season.

    Bert
     
  10. DroberF16

    DroberF16 Refuge Member

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    Thanks for the reply, literature was recommended and recieved and read.

    I am getting the dog in the next few days to finish up the season and the plans are to get him back to training afterwards.

    I have vacation this month and will be able to spend some quality time with him in the field blended in with quality time with the family of course.

    I told my self early on that I am very commited to the process and willing to commit the bucks. How long too long, how much too mucho??? Anyone?

    Cheers
    Dave:rolleyes:
     

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