Best Training DVD

Discussion in 'Gun Dog Forum' started by gungho, Aug 19, 2017.

  1. gungho

    gungho Senior Refuge Member

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    Got a new lab this summer. Thinking of getting one of these, any recommendations:
    (1) Rick Stawski's "Fowl Dogs" for $80
    (2) Evan Graham's "Smartwork" for $350
    (3) Mike Lardy's "Total Retriever Marking" for $140

    To spend $350, somebody really really needs to convince me that Smartworks is that much better than the other two. Appreciate the recommendations guys.
     
  2. qwk-qwk-b00m

    qwk-qwk-b00m Elite Refuge Member

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    What are your goals?
     
  3. Timber Hole

    Timber Hole Senior Refuge Member

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    I'm using Smartworks. Been worth every penny for me. You probably don't need the whole program, at least to start with. I think I spent a couple hundred.
     
  4. scully

    scully Senior Refuge Member

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    Hillman for pup then transition to Lardy or Rick Stawski's! For me Stawski was easy to follow! Not saying Smartworks was bad, just preferred the offers!
     
  5. Brack36

    Brack36 Senior Refuge Member

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    Smartworks is easy to understand and follow. I am also a Hillmann advocate.
     
  6. Dorkweed

    Dorkweed Elite Refuge Member

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    You'll spend a lot more if'n you need to send your do to a "professional"!!!

    How much did you spend on your pup?????? Did you expect training via breeding only???

    Invest in the avenue to give your dog the "skills" to become the retriever you want and dream of.
     
  7. KwickLabs

    KwickLabs Elite Refuge Member

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    The first retriever that I began seriously training was many years ago. There weren't any DVD's and "programs" were rather limited.
    You could look up material, but it wasn't easy to make a choice. Of course some things don't change.......but now there are a "bunch"
    to choose between and it not easy. Everyone has an opinion and the Internet is relentless. The fact is that if a person has "teaching
    skills" most of the many programs could prove to be useful (the first time around).


    Therefore, given the probability that teaching is the weak link, picking a program that stresses that above all else would be the best
    choice to begin with. There are three components to deal with.....the pup, the program and the teacher. The only thing that is static is
    the program.

    If one were to assume responsibility for the basic training of a pup it would probably be proactive to first quantify your teaching skills.
    Many simply do not know how to teach. Training a dog is not anything like passing multiple choice questions. A frequent and usually
    accurate comment made by new trainers goes something like "I know I'm not very good at training....." and then proceed to not
    deal with it.

    Teachers make out lesson plans usually every week (ahead of time)....things like "today's lesson" with a written rationale and some
    short range goals. The lesson should be tempered by this question "What does my pup need to know in advance so as to be able to
    learn this new thing we are working on today?" Play with a long range purpose in mind....every day taking short steps.

    There is a common theme to a well planned lesson. 1. Do something early that is fun and the pup does well....not long....just to get in
    the right frame of mind (warm up). 2. Do a quick review of what went well the day before. 3. Introduce any new lesson carefully before
    pup is worn out and/or not alert. And 4) lastly finish with something the pup is really good at and likes to do. (Always finish on a good
    "note").

    If you frame each training session around those four windows of opportunity just about any well established program will work. How
    well depends mostly of the potential of the pup and how much the trainer focuses on teaching. Pups thrive on well thought out, predictable
    routines.

    The program I am presently using focuses on being consistent and precise plus practicing (a lot) in short highly energized sessions. Of
    course, one might say those ideas would work with any program. Simply do what the pup needs, have fun and most of all....be a teacher.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2017
    deand1, jwcbf and Dorkweed like this.
  8. gungho

    gungho Senior Refuge Member

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    I am not looking to win certifications or competitions. I want an obedient dog that can do blind retrieves, doubles and maybe triples, steady to wing and shot, etc. I am a meat hunter.
     
  9. gungho

    gungho Senior Refuge Member

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    That is why I am asking the questions.
     
  10. gungho

    gungho Senior Refuge Member

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    Let me add more info: This is my 4th lab. I trained the other 3 based on the book "Water Dog". They did OK. I never did demand steady to Wing and shot. I could send them out on a blind retrieve. I want this dog at a higher level. And based on the 6 Pointing Dogs that I have trained, I like developing a training program based on a DVD as opposed to a book. Just makes things easier.
     

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