Blinds & Flooding & Anchoring

Discussion in 'Boats, Blinds, & Gadgets Forum' started by Troller, Apr 17, 2017.

  1. Troller

    Troller Senior Refuge Member

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    Jan 17, 2017
    I am in the stage of purchasing materials for a permanent blind that will be located on dry land, but close to a river. It looks like this area will flood, but with the elevation of the blind usually only the 4x4's will go under water.

    For guys that have been here and done that:

    How far should the 4x4's go into the ground? Use concrete?

    Did you anchor the blind to any surroundings?

    I have seen some very large screw in anchor systems that could accompany the 4x4's, is this a good idea or over kill?

    Any other advice will be welcomed.
     
  2. smashdn

    smashdn Elite Refuge Member

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    Palmyra, KY
    If it is on the edge of the water or bank I don't think you can sink them far enough. The blind will eventually pitch forward as the ground at the front of the blind is always a little wetter and softer than the back.

    I would use concrete and I would use the cardboard tube things and run the concrete up out above what you think the waterline will be. That way the 4x4 is out of the water and not in it. Even the treated stuff rots over time and beavers will gnaw on it too.
     
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  3. Buckmark311

    Buckmark311 Senior Refuge Member

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    No. IL
    ^concrete in tubes above the waterline is 100% the way to go. you are likely to have to replace even PT lumber due to the extreme heat, moisture and freezing the blind will see every year.

    Ive seen guys sink concrete posts with pipe sticking up and then they build a floating blind attached to the pipe. that way water levels don't get the blind wet.
     
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  4. STUMP52

    STUMP52 Elite Refuge Member

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    Location:
    KENTUCKY
    I've built three blinds on legs, two on dry ground until the backwater came up. All blind floors were 8' off the ground. The third blind was built in a swampy area that was muddy as all get out but no water when I built it. The two on the dry ground, I dug holes about 3' deep put the pole in and filled with quikrete. The one in the swamp, I built a driver out of a 2.5' piece of 6" pipe and welded about 25 lbs of steel on one end, added handles and walla! I drove the posts in as far as I could drive them. One went in 4', four went in around 2-3 ' and one made it in a whole foot. Once I had em in the mud, I got 3 plastic 55 gal drums and cut em in half with a chain saw. In the bottom of each half, I cut a square in the middle so I could slide them over the poles. But first, I drilled two holes all the way through each leg. First hole about 6" off the mud, the second on the adjacent side about a foot higher. Then I slid some rebar through the holes so I had at least 6 inches stickin out all four sides. I pulled the rebar, slid the drum half over the leg and down to the ground. Then I reinserted the rebar and filled the drum half with quikcrete. On these, I poured some water in. The drums act as a mud foot but will keep the blind down also even under 15-20 ft of water. On the dry ground blinds, don't worry bout em sinkin too much, ground normally dry will only saturate down a foot at the most plus when the blind tries to float, suction of the ground will hold it down. If you build over 6' high, make sure you cross brace the legs!! Make floor sturdy, sides and roof use minimal studs and metal siding and roofing.
     
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  5. STUMP52

    STUMP52 Elite Refuge Member

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    Location:
    KENTUCKY
    Found a couple pics that show a little of the structure.

    Swamp Blind
    image.jpeg

    Dry ground blind
    image.jpeg
     

    Attached Files:

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