Bobwhite quail on the endangered species list?

Discussion in 'Upland Game Forum' started by Clayton, Mar 12, 2001.

  1. Clayton

    Clayton Elite Refuge Member

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    west, Tennessee
    Areas that are presently being managed for quail have large numbers of birds and they are NOT (can't when it comes to hawks) doing predator management. You all are barking up the wrong tree when you keep focusing on predators as a part of the problem. It is all about habitat!!! Also many of those hawks you are seeing are red-tailed hawks, northern harriers, and red-shouldered hawks. These species of hawks are not commonly predators of birds. Yes predators and some of those being smaller hawks, which are not commonly seen, do take birds but that is a part of nature. Predators only have the CHANCE (but may not) to become an issue when habitat has been degraded/reduced/changed. Blaming the predators becomes too easy of a scapegoat rather that trying to deal with the real and harder issue of habitat loss. As I pointed out at the beginning we know in this day and time that we can have plenty of quail with the proper habitat WITHOUT predator control!
     
  2. Buckeye Quacker

    Buckeye Quacker Senior Refuge Member

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    Lima,Ohio,US
    Baloney Clayton ,
    It is a clear case of both habitat degration and alltime high numbers of preditor species such as Coon Fox Skunk Possium Are you trying to tell me that this is not the case ? That we don't have a major imbalance in the number of preditors right now in many parts of the country ? So much so that nature has already started her culling with mange on fox in the prarie to distemper on coon in my home state and through out many other counties and States through out the midwest.And are you also going to try and tell me that the trapper and the coon hunter didn't have any influance on the numbers of preditors ? I say baloney! I truly understand why you feel the way that you do about habitat Clayton I realize it is of utmost importance. But for you to ignore the other truly important factor of rebuilding a healthy Quail population buy having at least a fair balance in the population of peditiors is puzzeling. Right now I think that most people would have to agree the balance is way out of kelter.
    Good safe huntin,
    B.Q.


    G
     
  3. OldHunter

    OldHunter Senior Refuge Member

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    Sure we've got lots of predators right now, but there certainly have been other times when they were plentiful also. I still believe habitat is the major limiting factor in upland pops, but a little predator thinning might be in order also. Nothing wrong with Buckeye and his buddies taking a few four-legged critters. Actually I believe I've read that most predators follow the boom/bust type population cycle if left alone and trapping the surplus actually helps keep pops healthy. Perhaps in time, if they overpopulate they might have a massive die-off. Too bad. I also believe I have read that by killing off large predators such as coyotes, the smaller critters tend to increase in population. Can't beleive the number of dead skunks I have been seeing on the roads just lately. They must be in Rut right now. ;)
     
  4. Toolman

    Toolman Guest

    The Armadillos in Oklahoma have been exempt from most predator control antics of the local hunters. And man do we have them. I recently saw a show on OETA TV where the Texas and OK Armadillo populations thrive on...eggs! Any egg! Luckily quail pops in SW OK have been up these last 5 years.
     
  5. JN

    JN Senior Refuge Member

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    I can remember when I was just starting to hunt we would kill lots of quail now it's a rarety! In fact we usaly pass on them hoping one year they might come back, but I don't beleave they can with the new farming practices.
     
  6. oldsquaw

    oldsquaw Elite Refuge Member

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    Well if you say that predators arent the problem with population numbers of upland birds then tell me what happened to a few of the places i hunt. Over the past 5 or 6 years ive seen fewer birds every year. Nothing changed either. The places are still the same as they were 6 years ago. We even planted a few food plots in desperation to get soem birds back. The main difference that i saw was when fur prices went to hell. We used to have coyote drives about four times a year, when the prices for them went to nothing everyone just quite going. There used to be alot of coyotes killed every year now nobody hunts them. I used to coon hunt as a way for money in the winter months in my first two years of college and i might add that i killed alot of coons doing so. When the fur buyer came to town there would be a ton of people up there selling furs. today there are very few people in town on the weekends. The fact of the matter is that noboby goes hunting for fur bearing animals anymore (predators). In my personall opion there is more predators today than there were in years past. Look at the population boom of upland birds when there used to be a bounty on coyotes and foxes and fur prices were very high. My dad tells me stories of going bird hunting back then with his firends and shooting alot of birds year after year. Now noboy hunts anymore and the predators are getting out of control!
     
  7. Floridaboy

    Floridaboy Moderator Moderator

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    Here in FLA the problem has been development or habitat and fire ants. Seems the ants love the chicks, they don't hunt for them but a few stings and the chicks are stunned and then the ants gang up and sting them to death. Haven't seen too many coveys in the past 5-6 years.
     
  8. JN

    JN Senior Refuge Member

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    Well I will agree the drop in fur prices have had a large impact on all feathered ground nesting animals. I kill every egg eater I cross paths with but that is no comperision to how trappers helped us.
     

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