Buying a WRP program - Questions

Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by Gadgetmans, Feb 4, 2008.

  1. Gadgetmans

    Gadgetmans New Member

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    Mar 2, 2007
    Location:
    Wisconsin
    I have an option to purchase a 100 acre WRP project. The problem is that the current owner sold them the easement and I'm thinking that I'm not really buying much more than the right to access it. Do any of you know of other WRP projects that have sold and how they compare to unencumbered land in price? Is this program such a mess that I want to say away? It looks like it will be really nice when it's done and they have put the work our for bid. Any help would be apprciated. They are doing 18 scrapes and putting in a earth dam - duck hunting should be good.
     
  2. duckhawk-55

    duckhawk-55 Sponsor Sponsor

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    Sep 22, 2003
    Location:
    Flint River Bottoms, AL.
    Make sure you see the contract as to what rights you will have. Can you plant any of it, with approval? Is there any land left out of WRP that you will have total control over, place to build cabin, manage to suit you. Usually after owner is paid for WRP easement, the land price should be less than unencumbered similar properties, but consider the cost to put in improvments. That added to land cost would push value up making your place perhaps worth more as a hunting tract than value before it was put in WRP.
     
  3. eiderlab

    eiderlab Senior Refuge Member

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    Dec 19, 2004
    Location:
    vermont
    look at what the "compatible use" is on the property, meaning what can be done to the property on a yearly or periodic basis. Haying, brushhogging, soil disturbance management ( discing to promote the natural seed bed to grow), things of this nature. Talk to the biologists who are running the project and tell them what you are looking for. I was in the same position as you. I had to ask 4 or 5 times why I can or can't do something. Even the biologists on my project had differing opinions. Ask for all your options and work with them to make the best choices. good luck.
     
  4. da fowl slayer

    da fowl slayer Elite Refuge Member

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    Aug 14, 2000
    Location:
    TN
    You should get a nice discount to fair value on the land. As stated above check what you are allowed by the contract to do. each property is negotiated differently within reason of course. most i have seen near me allow for ag food plots on like 10-15% of the ground.

    in my opinon makes the property less desirable as you have lost alot of control of the ground, but is the dicount worth living with wrp.
     
  5. Pintail_Punk

    Pintail_Punk Senior Refuge Member

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    Apr 25, 2004
    Location:
    Nebraska
    Value of the land is generally lower with an easement versus "highest and best" value. I would first ask what the contract length is....WRP can be 10-year, 30-year, or permanent. If you plan to own a long time, a 10-year contract is not as big a deal.

    I've seen great WRP projects and not so great. It sometimes varies by the knowledge of the local staff delivering the project. Overall, it's a great program that protects the land while paying the landowner for the sacrifice of development and cost-sharing wetland restoration to make the property better for ducks.

    Again, consider contract length, compatible uses, and any areas excluded from the easement. Don't be afraid to ask alot of questions or bring other org's to the table to evaluate the restoration and management plan.
     
  6. BT

    BT Senior Refuge Member

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    Dec 10, 2000
    Location:
    Mosheim, TN
    It makes all the difference in the world why you are buying it. Are you buying a place to duck hunt? Or is that an added benefit? I'm in the process of starting the construction on my first one. Seems to me that WRP is best suited for those who are buying it to hunt or who already own the land and can develop part for hunting/conservation/whatever.
     
  7. eiderlab

    eiderlab Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
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    Dec 19, 2004
    Location:
    vermont
    Who here owns wrp property and plants on it. I'm having a hard time convincing the biologists on my project to let me plant something on my 100 acre piece. Are there rules out there that someone can send me that state that i can plant a portion of my easement. Thanks Eiderlab
     
  8. BT

    BT Senior Refuge Member

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    860
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    Dec 10, 2000
    Location:
    Mosheim, TN
    My NRCS guy told me that the break down is:

    at least 70% to be planted in bottomland hardwoods
    up to 30% open area (impoundments, etc)
    Of that 30%, up to 5% can be food plot

    I've never seen this in writing, but I can check with him.
     
  9. Tgrindlay

    Tgrindlay Elite Refuge Member

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    Apr 25, 2000
    Location:
    Seymour, IN
    Manage for smartweed. The pink variety grows on dry ground. Nodding (white flower) will grow in 3-6" of water.

    Pull the water off in March. Barnyard grass does well with June drawdowns.

    You can do 5% food plots. I'd get nodding started.
     
  10. eiderlab

    eiderlab Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    263
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2004
    Location:
    vermont
    we dug 5 ponds and created a large berm around my property to hold water, worked out great this fall, had lots of mallards using the area. We planted smartweed on all the edges of the ponds and it came up nice. However, this "wet area" only accounts for about 20 acres. I have some higher ground that does not flood that I would love to plant barely or some other cereal grain. Where is everyone getting this 5 or 10% of your property can be a food plot. Can someone send me some literture or give me a name or phone # to contact. Thanks Eiderlab
     

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