Buying a WRP program - Questions

Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by Gadgetmans, Feb 4, 2008.

  1. knees

    knees Elite Refuge Member

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    We were looking at doing WRP on some of our ground and we were told that only 5% could be planted into food plots.
     
  2. ashes

    ashes Senior Refuge Member

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  3. landman

    landman Elite Refuge Member Sponsor

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    Here in North Carolina, the WRP projects I have seen on the market seem to trade at 1:3 or so. In other words, a $3000/acre property fully encumbered by WRP is not worth more than $1000/acre approximately
     
  4. ghak99

    ghak99 Elite Refuge Member

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    There should be a set of "rules" you the owner are supposed to abide by. You should be able to get these from the office that handled your WRP project and contract. 5% and 10% are common.

    You might just go talk to them and find out what they are like to work with. As long as you don't get out of hand, don't try to harvest anything, and are really trying to improve the habitat for the wildlife they may prefer a don't ask don't tell policy or "not notice" some extra plots.
     
  5. ghak99

    ghak99 Elite Refuge Member

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    I'm guessing this will vary with the flyway and hunting pressure. Here it seems closer to a 2:3 ratio depending on the location.
     
  6. ashes

    ashes Senior Refuge Member

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    Highly suggest not going that route with WRP easement...........

    f Inspecting the Site for Easement Violations
    All easements will be inspected annually for violations. An easement violation is any unauthorized use of the site, such as encroachment, cropping, dumping trash, and drilling.

    At a minimum, onsite inspections will be completed every third year unless a violation is found. Onsite visits consist of walking the easement boundary and confirming that the interior of the easement site is not being used for unauthorized purposes, and verifying that the easement boundaries are still clearly marked as described in section 514.31.

    In the years when there is no onsite inspection, the evaluation will be by slides, satellite imagery, aerial photography, etc. The technique selected must be appropriate to allow the integrity of the easement to be assessed.

    When a violation occurs, onsite visits will be conducted once every 6 months, for a period of 18 months after the violation has been cured.

    Waivers for variances of the onsite inspection frequency can be obtained with approval of the National Program Manager and OGC.

    d When a Violation is Confirmed
    When a violation of the easement, restoration cost-share agreement, or any contract or compatible use authorization is confirmed, the landowner shall be given reasonable notice and an opportunity to voluntarily correct the violation within 30 days of the date of the notice, or such additional time as the State Conservationist may allow. The State Conservationist shall send written notice to the landowner by certified, return receipt mail. OGC should review the draft notice prior to sending it to the landowner to ensure that NRCS is not compromising its enforcement position. The returned receipt card must be kept in the official agreement file.

    Prior to and immediately following the response deadline, an onsite visit will be made to see if the landowner has complied with the correction notice.

    When the landowner:
    NRCS shall:

    has complied
    send the landowner a certified letter notifying compliance with the correction notice.

    See paragraph 514.47(f) for frequency of inspections after violations.

    has not complied
    send a certified letter indicating noncompliance and that the case is now being forwarded for further enforcement action.

    The State Conservationist will work with OGC and the Department of Justice to prepare the required case brief and pursue any legal action.


    e Personal Liability
    The landowner receiving the cost-share payments is responsible to the Federal Government for any losses the Federal Government sustains when the landowner does any of the following:

    infringes on the rights of others,

    does not comply with applicable laws or regulations, or

    allows others to infringe on the rights of the Federal Government.

    f Recovering Costs
    The United States or the Department shall be entitled to recover any and all administrative and legal costs, including attorney's fees or expenses, associated with any enforcement or remedial action. Legal action can take either or both of two forms:

    criminal prosecution of the person who violates the easement, Federal law, or regulation, and

    civil action to prevent further easement violation or to collect monetary damages.
     
  7. ghak99

    ghak99 Elite Refuge Member

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    There are so many guys in my area planting and flooding the complete wrp, putting semi trailers under easement ground for pits and living quarters, building permanent cabins on easement ground, and farming portions of neighboring WRP they have more on their hands to deal with then my extra couple acres of food plot I'm leaving stand. They know the difference between blatant abuse and emptying out extra seed from the field planter. One of the blatant violators has put several more properties into the program all while having a pending case so either they don't have any money or are not too worried about it.

    I've got burms washed out right now that they have no money to fix and don't know when they might be able to get some. When asked about fixing them......uhh I don't know, well maybe this form, well hell just do it.

    When asked about controlling certain weeds the county requires to be controlled you get the same run around........I'll see if I can find the correct paper work, just go ahead and do it.....You never hear back from them.

    Their inspectors have a hard enough time reading maps and even finding the property let alone actually reading the plans and finding the locations of anything.
     
  8. eiderlab

    eiderlab Senior Refuge Member

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    Thanks Ashes, Found what I am looking for in 514.21-f. States, can have a food plot no more than 5% of the total easement.
     
  9. ashes

    ashes Senior Refuge Member

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    You sir, need to contact your State NRCS Biologist. You never known when National NRCS Headquarters Staff will make a visit;) . If the local offices are not administering the program properly your State NRCS office needs to know. If there are program violations, they need to know.

    If your WRP site needs repairs go around the local DC and call the State Office. Hopefully WRP will be fully funded under the 2008 Farm Bill that is in Conference Committee currently and there will be funds available for more offers to be made and to repair your issue. If you can't locate the number and name of a contact just ask and
     
  10. ALLSTAR 1

    ALLSTAR 1 Elite Refuge Member

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    WRP is not to create a place to duck hunt. It is to conserve and improve wetlands in there "natural" state to benefit a myriad of species of plants and animals. It benefits waterfowl within those parameters. If hunters abuse the program Congress will no longer fund it.
    If you want a flooded corn field you certainly can have it on your land but not on WRP that has already paid a big chunk of tax dollars to the owner.
    I really do understand the desire to be able to have your own duck club paid for by me and I would like to have one paid for by you, but that is not the way the program was written and funded. It is still a good program and keeps some of the seasonal wetlands from being drained.
     

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