Calling all breeders?

Discussion in 'Gun Dog Forum' started by havenhunter, Dec 31, 2003.

  1. havenhunter

    havenhunter Elite Refuge Member

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    Most responsible breeders have non breeding contracts on thier dogs and with good reason. what do you require from a person who was buying a pup from you with the intention of starting thier own line? (aside from health clearances those are a given)
     
  2. Swampcollie

    Swampcollie Elite Refuge Member

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    They need to participate in some type of organized event(s) and earn titles with the dogs in those events.

    Participation is required because it gets people involved with a lot of other dogs as well as their own. They get to see a lot of dogs and learn to evaluate what's good and bad in dogs of their respective breed. Without this education, the prospective breeder would be working in a vacuum, knowing only a handfull of dogs.
     
  3. mallardrobin

    mallardrobin Elite Refuge Member

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    As a breeder and getting out of breeding for awhile, the two litters that were born recently are going to be sold with limited registration. They must get their certifications before I will allow any breeding to be done. I am also going to require that the new owners get some sort of title, whether it is a JH or a CD or above before I allow breeding. Canine good citizenships do not count, However anything that is agility or schutzhund is acceptable, but highly unlikely for the latter. I am currently in transistion from breeding hunting dog and hunt test dogs to hunt test and field trial dogs.
     
  4. Batman

    Batman Elite Refuge Member

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    How do you actually prevent the owner from breeding their dog?
     
  5. Swampcollie

    Swampcollie Elite Refuge Member

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    Good Question Batman.

    The answer is, you can't. But you can prevent them from registering the litter and any offspring they would produce.
     
  6. mallardrobin

    mallardrobin Elite Refuge Member

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    people are going to do what they are going to do no matter what. But if we as breeders educate people enough on what to look for, then we are helping ourselves and the breeds. There is no doubt in my mind that there will always be crappy breeders out there, but as long as we are conscientious about what we are doing I think we can make great strides against these byb's. More and more of the general buying public want something for what they are getting. I do not really see enough to blame them. BUT on the other hand good breeding does not come cheap either. If I pay say 800 bucks for a fc/afc sire pup, which I am, then I have a pretty good idea what the outcome is going to be on that pup. There are no gurantees in life be we can certainly try to eliminate the irregularities by breeding responsibly.
     
  7. havenhunter

    havenhunter Elite Refuge Member

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    First I should say I am dealing with Tollers and would like to get started before too many get ahold of the breed and ruin it.... this is my motivation. The fact is that I love the breed and have seen some bad breeding trends. I know what I don't like in the breeding more so than what I like or think is good. Maybe I shouldn't be talking about this with no expierience in any dog events?
    I am looking at buying a toller with the intention of putting a conformation title and maybe a hunt test title on her so that I may breed her one day. I think there is room to improve this breed and I am nervous because I don't want to start off with a bad pup. I think after 2 years I have found my breeder and its funny because I'm going back to the person I got my first toller from.
     
  8. Batman

    Batman Elite Refuge Member

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    Thanks swampcollie... more rookie questions: How does this actually work? I think I remember reading that the breeder has to sign the new owner's papers before it will be accepted by the AKC. Right? So do you then refuse to sign until after they have gotten the title you want or certificate or whatever? Now, if it's a hunt test title, don't you need a registered dog before you can even enter the test? Last one, doesn't it cost more to register the dog the longer you wait? So do people complain about that? Thanks!
     
  9. wetdogs

    wetdogs Senior Refuge Member

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    You can still register the dog, but the dog is under limited registration. That means you can do any performance event with your dog, just not conformation showing. Any offspring of a LR dog cannot be registered by the AKC.

    If you are entering into this type of arrangement, then everything needs to be spelled out in the contract. When will they (if ever) change the registration to full, based on what criteria, etc. Who will pay the fee ($25) to change the registration over (usually the owner pays the breeder to do it).

    As with most things, an agreement is only as good as the people you're dealing with.
     
  10. locke

    locke Elite Refuge Member

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    Definitely have it spelled out in a contract, better yet don't do it.

    More and more folks are purchasing dogs with good pedigrees and opening shop and starting a breeding operation. They have very limited knowledge about breeding and do not actively compete in any AKC events.

    One person inparticular in our area had all the best intentions to actively compete in field trails, however she absolutely had no idea how much money it would take to successfully embark in that endeavor. It sounded good on paper, but competing never came to fruition. I have seen about 4 of these types of breeding operations start up here in the houston area and shut down because they had difficulty selling dogs. Breeding for the most part is a losing proposition to begin with. In the financial realm anyways. You have to do it for the love and betterment of the breed.
     

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