Calling Technique question

Discussion in 'Duck & Goose Calling Forum' started by Hawkeyebowhunter, Oct 12, 2018.

  1. Hawkeyebowhunter

    Hawkeyebowhunter Refuge Member

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    Just curious, but as I get better with my duck call I'm trying out new techniques/sounds such as the cajun squeal and bouncing hen.

    Are these useful when hunting over water, or since they simulate feeding ducks would that be better suited for land based waterfowling?

    I'm hunting central Iowa, so there's plenty of corn fields around. The places I hunt are primarily marshes with plenty of food in the water, but am hoping to be able to hunt some fields as well.

    Thanks!
     
  2. calling4life

    calling4life Elite Refuge Member

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    About anything works if you can read the birds. I use very aggressive diver purrs on my single reed mallard calls to pull in divers all the time, it is amazing how they respond to calling when you just do it and aren't afraid to get in their face with it. Like seriously, nobody must call at them, I've seen some interesting things.

    I've had days on water when the Cajun squeal is insanely effective, I mix bouncing hens in with my feed essentially whenever I do a feed call. Test the waters, give the birds what they want regardless of what that is
     
  3. Hawkeyebowhunter

    Hawkeyebowhunter Refuge Member

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    guess I haven't heard of the diver purr, i'll have to youtube it!
     
  4. BFG

    BFG Senior Refuge Member

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    It's more of a rumbling grunt than a purr. Every once in awhile we will hear bluebills doing it in a big group.

    In regard to your bouncing hen question...you'll never know until you try it. One guy can tell you to "give 'em hell" and others will say "just stay quiet" but until YOU put that call to your mouth and try to talk to that duck...nobody knows what is going to happen. I've seen birds flip the finger to some of the nastiest, life-like quacks and chatter to only drop right into a guy that sounded like his kid just got a new DR-85 for Christmas.

    Experience is gained every time you take the field. If you have repeated success, you are doing something correctly. If you fail repeatedly, try to figure out why. Plenty of times, it's because the first thing guys do when they see birds is start blowing their calls.
     
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  5. mpkowal

    mpkowal Elite Refuge Member

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    Not trying to be a smartarse but do your best to sound like a duck,not a buddy,not a soundfile,not a video,a live mallard duck.
    Working for me for 53 years now.If you cant go somewhere and listen to live ducks,Google up some audio of recorded ducks.
     
  6. callinfowl

    callinfowl Kalifornia Forum

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    I had a massive rumbling grunt a few hours ago.
    I had a 24OZ. piece of prime rib Friday night and I just passed what was left with it a little while.ago, whoooah that was a rough one .
    Sounding exactly like a duck is WAY over rated.
    Work on your timing and hit'um hard and fast and they will break thier necks trying to get back to you.:yes:tu
     
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  7. Rick Hall

    Rick Hall Elite Refuge Member

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    That's been my experience. I might get trashy on the call when birds are wanting to work, anyway, because I like to think it makes a better show for my hunters - and I enjoy doing it. But well timed crisp, clean calling has generally provided the most real leverage.

    Keep a daily log and had to go back to 2016-2017 to find this entry in a morning's "responsiveness" section" that stood out in my memory due to its oddity:
    (When I reference that DC as "squacky" or "squacky" hen quacks I'm speaking to a harshness, not snottyness: with a lisp or tendency toward squeals being an example of the later.)
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2018
    goosehunter64 and callinfowl like this.
  8. OneShotBandit

    OneShotBandit Elite Refuge Member Supporting Member

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    I go down to the public ramp that has a creek next to it- hide behind the trees and listen to the hens & try to mimick(sp) them. If they respond & swim down toward me then I'm happy w/my calling. FWIW I actually heard a hen do the "Bouncing Hen" call.
     
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  9. DrakeStar

    DrakeStar Elite Refuge Member

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    Im lucky,have quite a few water holes and rivers in close proximity to observe many kinds of ducks and geese and what calls and sounds they do in contented and confrontational situations, nature is the best teacher.
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2018
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  10. callinfowl

    callinfowl Kalifornia Forum

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    I find that the trashy confrontational calling works more often than the mellow content calling does in the loafing area that I hunt. Almost like the hens get territorial of the places that they like to nap/loaf in.:yes:tu
     
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