Chucker Hunt

Discussion in 'Upland Game Forum' started by Legband, Oct 7, 2013.

  1. Legband

    Legband Senior Refuge Member Sponsor

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    Aug 10, 2013
    Location:
    Central California
    This was livy's first hunt of the year , the club birds are a good warm up for quail season in a couple of weeks.
     

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  2. Brdhntr47

    Brdhntr47 Elite Refuge Member

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    Location:
    Hudson Valley,N.Y.
    I was chasing them for a few weeks with the new pup. Our regular seasons have opened now so we won't be after them again till March. Hope you and Livy have a great year.

    Dennis
     
  3. Greybeard

    Greybeard Elite Refuge Member

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    I sure wish we still had the numbers of Birds we had back before the 70's.
    It's nothing but luck if you can find a Covey of Bobs or even one Rooster in a downed Corn Field or standing Hedge Row.
    Can't say as I blame the Farmers though.....they have to make a living too!

    It's a beautiful Fall day outside my window....sure wish I was about 20 again:tu
     
  4. Squaller

    Squaller Elite Refuge Member

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    Joe,

    I shoot a lot of planted birds over the dogs... It is great training and fun for the dogs for sure...

    Hunting labs, planted chuckar are not the best choice... They tend to hold just a bit too tight, and the dogs catch a very high percentage of them... It is truly amazing the difference between wild and planted chuckar....

    If possible, I prefer planted Bobwhites... They tend to covey up, they hold, but not so tight that the dog catches them... After breaking up the covey you hunt the singles (just like valley quail). I also think the scent trail is more reminiscent of valley quail, and they will run a little, making the dog have to track them a little... Plus, they are far less expensive per bird...

    Finding a place that has good bobwhites can be tough though, and there are less and less clubs each year that have them... And, they tend to fly closer to the ground (but faster)... So, planted bobwhites would NOT be a good choice for a new or inexperienced hunter.

    And, like chuckar, bobwhites do not do well with a lot of moisture.

    Nice point by the by.:tu
     
  5. dakndug

    dakndug Moderator Moderator

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    Location:
    Maryland
    If ya want a bird that flushes early/wild find someone raising Huns! Wild Huns are best, but if your planting birds and want wild type flushes, use Huns. They covey up too and they flush WILD!

    Nice Shorthair!

    Doug
     
  6. Squaller

    Squaller Elite Refuge Member

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    I have heard that huns are fun... They are not very popular, and it is tough to find a place that has them. I have to wonder if they are more difficult to raise, or if there is another reason they are not more popular???

    I know the bobwhite quail are tough to deal with. They are a lot less expensive, but more subject to disease, and they "pop." It is my understanding that as they are being collected from the pens, that many will die from being startled (i.e. "pop"). If available they are my top choice, as they do move around a field a bit, and they will flush as the dog gets close. Plus, good quail make for sporty targets.

    For a flushing dog, planted chuckar are not always a good choice cause they hold so tight and the dog does not learn how to track, and in my experience catches the birds a high percentage of the time. Good pheasants tend to run too much and can be a bit too challenging for training purposes, and big lumbering pheasants are in the same category as chuckar.

    My buddy with pointers has had good luck training young dogs on chuckar, as it is apparently a good experience to make a dog hold point...
     
  7. cancan

    cancan Elite Refuge Member

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    If you can find em tenn reds or tenn red northern bob crosses, flush much more like wild bobs....but Doug is right, except for being more expensive hard to beat huns for planting....
     
  8. Cooper

    Cooper Senior Refuge Member

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    Location:
    Central MT
    I have never tried pen raised huns but they are far and above my favorite wild bird.

    Cooper
     

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