Cleaning your shotgun the correct way

Discussion in 'Shooting - Reloading Forum' started by Kevin Burroughs, Jan 30, 2018.

  1. Gander

    Gander Elite Refuge Member

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    Hot soapy water helps to remove all the old lubricant and grit that builds up. I run parts under hot soapy water all the time. Just make sure you lube it back up afterwards after it dries. If it's hot enough, it dries pretty quick. You can use a hair dryer to speed up this process. I use it on the receiver of my Kolar after I have been out in the rain.
     
  2. Tuleman

    Tuleman Elite Refuge Member

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    10GAGE is right; a century ago hot water was required in the gun-cleaning process, for the reason he mentioned. Today it is not necessary and, while it will still work to an extent, there are better ways. Most everyone has access to hot soapy water though, and it's cheap compared to mineral spirits/Stoddard solvent/GunScrubber. Plus there's the old human nature that says "If it was good enough for my Grandpa, it's good enough for me."

    If I was using hot soapy water to clean my gun, I follow up with a rinse of plenty of hot clear water, followed by a thorough drying with 100psi compressed shop air, and an immediate and complete coating of a good corrosion-preventive lubricant.
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2018
  3. Kevin Burroughs

    Kevin Burroughs Elite Refuge Member

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    Take your gun to a gunsmith and it will get cleaned with soap and water. It may be in a Ultra Sonic cleaner but it will be water and soap.

    The problem with solvents unless you clean it off with soap and water it will help repel any lubricant you put on the gun. If anything, solvent is old school cleaning. This method works great and is very friendly to gun finish.
     
  4. California Flyway

    California Flyway Elite Refuge Member

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    Muzzle loader shooters have been using hot water for cleaning longer than anyone on these Forums has been alive.

    If you pour boiling water on parts, the heat that is transferred causes water to evaporate.
     
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  5. 43x

    43x Elite Refuge Member

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    [QUOTE="California Flyway

    If you pour boiling water on parts, the heat that is transferred causes water to evaporate.[/QUOTE]

    I remember my dad doing this to some neglected guns he picked up , it Amaze me to see the water flash off
     
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  6. California Flyway

    California Flyway Elite Refuge Member

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    Metal cleaning products have come a long way and for the better.
    How well I remember the smell of that nasty, caustic carb cleaner from 40 years ago. I would take apart a Holley four barrel put the parts in a perforated stainless tray and lower lower it to "cook". You then hosed off the shiny clean parts. I was always a little careless about wearing gloves doing that and with the clear solvent cleaner machines. I remember after getting the carb cleaner on my hands I would have a burning sensation for a couple of days. Me and my buddies got exposed to all kinds of bad stuff working on cars back then. I wear throwaway rubber gloves these days when working on any projects involving cleaners, paint, and petroleum products.
    The new solvents and cleaners seem to do the job without being so poisonous. A lot of industries have switched over to citrus based cleaners.
     
  7. JBRUNO4590

    JBRUNO4590 Elite Refuge Member

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    I've used Kevin's method since I first saw it on here years ago. Have to say it works flawlessly and I haven't had a problem since. If it didn't say it before, I'll say it now....Thanks!!
     
  8. Rice Hunter

    Rice Hunter Senior Refuge Member

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    I also use this method once season is over on several scatterguns.

    I use Simple green, hot water, to the point it's almost boiling, lots of brushes and rags and an air compressor.

    Flat out works.

    Edit: I also put my butt stock and foreend (only synthetics) in the hot water.
     
  9. Steelshot Scott

    Steelshot Scott Senior Refuge Member

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    I was USMC, 3rd Recon Battalion, Bravo Co. When we used to do salt water insertions or dive in to a area we would use field mess dishwashers to clean our weapons after we got back to the rear. We would put the entire weapon in the washer(to keep all parts with their original weapon). Those things got boiling hot. Upon removing from hot water we would strip them down(completely) and soak them in CLP. Then we would clean them thoroughly, ending off with nylon brushes and Q-Tips until they were spotless. But we only did that after weapons were submerged in salt water. I was a M-60 gunner so my task was rather time consuming.

    The first time I saw it done, I was horrified we were going to put our weapons in water to clean them. But it worked really well.
     
  10. Luigi Daniele

    Luigi Daniele Elite Refuge Member

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    God bless you for your service. Thank you.
     

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