Cold Weather Outboard Starting

Discussion in 'Boats, Blinds, & Gadgets Forum' started by cjr, Nov 13, 2017.

  1. cjr

    cjr New Member

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    Connecticut
    I have a 2-stroke Yamaha 25 hp pull start from the last year they sold 2-strokes. It is a great motor with one exception. When it is cold out (air temp less than 25 or so) it is an absolute bear to start. It has never not started but frequently takes a ton of pulls (30 or 40 though I have never counted) to get it going first thing on cold mornings. There is nothing more frustrating than being the first one to the ramp and watching 3 other boats launch and leave while I crank away on my pull start.

    Is there anything I can do about this?

    I have thought about trying to heat up the motor over night but I'm not sure how I would safely go about doing that short of taking the motor off and bringing it inside the night before a hunt.

    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks.
    Chris
     
  2. Olefart

    Olefart Senior Refuge Member

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    Might try rebuilding carb, sounds like its abit lean on cold start up.
     
  3. hhpage

    hhpage Senior Refuge Member

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    I have noticed that my Yamaha 25 2 stroke does not start well if it is in the shallow drive position (which is where I have it at launch). Seems to start just fine as long as I remember to let it down into regular running position.
     
    California Flyway and Fowler267 like this.
  4. perfmarine

    perfmarine Elite Refuge Member

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    Make sure your choke or primer system is working. Then check compression, when motors get low on compression they get hard to start in the cold. If all else fails, squirt some fogging fluid in the carb for starting fluid.
     
  5. IDECOYM

    IDECOYM Senior Refuge Member

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    I have a Yam 25 4 stoke and it can be a bit cold blooded too. I was told to put it in gear and "rev" the throttle a few times, put back in neutral and try to start. It seems to help, not sure if it will work for you. Also starting like hhpage said about having motor in down position.
     
  6. frankman

    frankman Senior Refuge Member

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    I’ve got an 89 Johnson 30 hp that is the coldest blooded thing I’ve seen, two pulls on the primer knob then a little bit as needed to keep it running, after 2 or 3 minutes she’s ready to go but not before then
     
  7. Tuleman

    Tuleman Elite Refuge Member

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    This is excellent advice from perfmarine.

    This advice is not so good, in my opinion. Fogging fluid is oil. Oil does not ignite as easily as gasoline does. It does not work as a substitute for starting fluid (ether) which ignites more easily than oil or gasoline. If you need a starting fluid, use starting fluid.
     
  8. GUNNERX2

    GUNNERX2 Elite Refuge Member

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    Every motor I've owned has been "unique".
    The 1st was a Wizard Powermatic 12 (made by Mercury I believe in 1957) and was quirky to get started. Cold weather was the worst. One morning I had to take the motor off the boat and set it in the front seat of the car to warm up. Took a while for the gas smell to go away.
    2nd was a Mercury 20 from the mid 70's bought used. Even in warm weather, it was tough to get going. One "cool" morning, hunting alone, I couldn't get it started and the ducks were flying everywhere. I pulled on that cold hearted winch 'til my clothes were soaked through with sweat. Disgusted, I put the boat back on the trailer and headed to a repair shop. The mechanic started it on the second pull. I asked how the heck he did that. He proceeded to show me the "secondary" choke that I didn't know existed.
    3rd is the motor I have now, a 1988 Suzuki 30 hp 3 hole. When new, it started great despite the weather but over time, it got continually harder and harder. We ended up cranking it (pull start) while on the trailer where footing and leverage were better. Once it fired, it was shut off and when in the water, it would start right up. Finally, it got to the point that getting it going was iffy and would die if put in the shallow water position. Starting it in shallow water position after dying was impossible. The upshot was the carbs needed rebuilding and one float bowl had a hole in it.
    Probably will never purchase another motor at my advanced years but if I do, the dang thing gonna have electric start. If I run the battery down trying to get it started, I'm going back home.
     
  9. frankman

    frankman Senior Refuge Member

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    Like my old Johnson, one too many pulls on the primer ur gonna be waitin for it to dry out or pull the plugs, not enough fuel you’ll pull till ur tired
     
  10. Fowler267

    Fowler267 Elite Refuge Member

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    My Yamaha 40 2 stroke used to be really great at starting. The engine trimmed down as far as possible DOES MAKE A DIFFERANCE!
    These days it is decent if it has been run quite a bit. If it has sat for a few weeks, I have used the fuel bypass deal on the port side of the engine to get it going.

    Oddly enough, I had a 95 Force 9.9 by Mercury ... It was always a great starting motor even on five degree mornings.
     

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