Common Foods That Are Toxic to Dogs.

Discussion in 'Gun Dog Forum' started by Losthwy, Feb 5, 2007.

  1. Losthwy

    Losthwy Elite Refuge Member

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    A post on RTF about a dog that had to be put down after eating raisins got me to post this short list of common items that should be avoided.
    Go to www.peteducation.com/ for more information.

    1. Raisins/Grapes
    2. Caffeine
    3. Raw Eggs
    4. Raw Fish
    5. Tobacco
    6. Hops
    7. Acetaminophen- common pain reliever
    8. Xylitol- sweetener found in mints, candy and food.
    9. Chocolate
    10. Alcohol
    11. Mushrooms
    12. Onions/Garlic
     
  2. UplandAngler

    UplandAngler Senior Refuge Member

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    I believe onions should be on that list.
     
  3. Ben Hix

    Ben Hix Elite Refuge Member

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    My dog should have been dead years ago if that where true.
     
  4. me&mylab

    me&mylab Elite Refuge Member

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    I'd add onions to your list, and change acetaminophen to ibuprofen.



    Acetaminophen Dosage
    From Plumb's Veterinary Drug Handbook 5th Edition:
    Dogs

    As an analgesic:

    1. 15 mg/kg PO q8h (Dodman 1992); (McLaughlin 2000)

    2. 10 mg/kg PO q12h (Kelly 1995)

    3. In the treatment of degenerative myelopathy (in German Shepherds): 5 mg/kg PO (not to exceed 20 mg/kg per day) (Clemmons 1991)

    Dogs also do not metabolize acetaminophen as well as humans and its use must be judicious. In dogs, it is generally not recommended to use acetaminophen during the immediate post-operative phase (first 24 hours) due to an increased risk of hepatotoxicity developing.
     
  5. me&mylab

    me&mylab Elite Refuge Member

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    From Veterinary Information Network (VIN)

    Onions

    Onions are members of the genus Allium (Other members of this genus include garlic, leek, shallot, and chive). Pieces of onion, onion powder, or even cooked onion, can cause damage to red blood cells which could result in anemia in both dogs and cats. The primary toxic component is n-propyl disulfide, which is thought to cause oxidative damage to erythrocytes, resulting in hemolysis.4 Toxicoses from fresh, dried, or, powdered plant material have been reported in dogs and cats. In one study, dogs developed hemolytic anemia after being fed 30 g/kg of onions once daily for 3 days.5 Feeding commercial baby food containing onion powder has also been reported to cause toxicity in cats. 6 Clinical signs associated with onion poisoning include hemolytic anemia, hemoglobinuria, vomiting, weakness, and pallor.
     
  6. me&mylab

    me&mylab Elite Refuge Member

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    Here's a couple of more, also from VIN (sorry, there isn't an author listed to give credit too):

    Macadamia Nuts

    Macadamia nuts may cause problems if ingested by dogs. According to a retrospective study, clinical signs commonly reported in dogs ingesting macadamia nuts include weakness, depression, vomiting, ataxia, tremors, and hyperthermia.7,8 The lowest dose reported to cause clinical effects is 2.4 g/kg.7 In most cases, dogs developed clinical signs within the first twelve hours post ingestion.7,8 These signs have only been seen in dogs and the exact cause for their sensitivity is unknown.


    Rising Bread Dough

    Ingestion of rising bread dough can be life-threatening to dogs. The animal's body heat will cause the dough to rise in the stomach. Ethanol is produced during the rising process; and, the dough may expand several times its original size. Signs seen with bread dough ingestion are associated with ethanol toxicoses and foreign body obstruction may include severe abdominal pain, bloating, vomiting, incoordination, and depression.9
     
  7. shoot-straight

    shoot-straight Senior Refuge Member

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    grapes? my dog loved em. (never ate them in any number though)

    raw eggs? why?
     
  8. Doc E

    Doc E Elite Refuge Member Sponsor

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    Because of the Biotin deficiency which develops from "chemically" coagulating the albumin.
    Albumin must be coagulated before it can be utilized. Cooking coagulates the albumin -- when given raw, it takes large amounts of Biotin to coagulate the albumin------------which can result in Biotin deficiency.




    .
     
  9. Losthwy

    Losthwy Elite Refuge Member

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    You are right onions and garlic should be on the list, I know some garlic is in dog food, but too much is not good. Post edited.
     
  10. duchunter

    duchunter Elite Refuge Member

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    Can someone explain the grapes to me
     

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