Common Foods That Are Toxic to Dogs.

Discussion in 'Gun Dog Forum' started by Losthwy, Feb 5, 2007.

  1. cancan

    cancan Elite Refuge Member

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    ive always heard choclate is bad and always made sure the dogs didnt get any....that said my female got into a 1lb bag of m&m's few years back and i was worried....nothing detectable seemed to happen tho.
     
  2. Cappy_TX

    Cappy_TX Elite Refuge Member

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  3. me&mylab

    me&mylab Elite Refuge Member

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    I'm not a toxicologist, but according to this article (from VIN), sounds pretty definitive that it's the nut:

    Macadamia Nut Toxicity1-2
    Last updated on 1/2/2006.
    Contributors:
    Linda G. Shell, DVM, DACVIM (Neurology)

    Disease description:
    The exact cause of the clinical signs of toxicosis resulting from macadamia nut ingestion by dogs is unknown. Since toxicity has only been seen in dogs, the actual mechanism of action could be specific to the dog and may involve constituents of the nuts themselves, contaminants from processing, mycotoxins, or other unidentified causes. 1-2

    In most cases, dogs develop an inability to stand or use their hind limbs within the first twelve hours post ingestion. Depression, vomiting, ataxia, tremors, and hyperthermia can also be present. 1-2 Based on ASPCA APCC data, clinical signs were reported after dogs ingested as little as 2.4 to as much as 62.4 g/kg. In an attempt to reproduce the syndrome, 4 dogs were gavaged with 20 g macadamia nuts/kg bw in a water slurry. The experimentally dosed dogs developed weakness, manifested by the inability to rise 12 h after dosing, mild central nervous system depression, vomiting, and hyperthermia, with rectal temperatures up to 40.5 C. Mild elevations in serum triglycerides and serum alkaline phosphatase were detected. Lipase values peaked sharply at 24 h and returned to normal by 48 h after dosing.


    They ground up the nut and gave it to the dogs, then the dogs had clinical signs. Not proof positive (and there may be more current studies), but pretty good evidence.
     
  4. Maineduckhunter

    Maineduckhunter Elite Refuge Member

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    As to the Grape/Raisin question, my understanding (from what I was told/read) is it's no so much the grape/raisin itself (skin & meat) it's the seeds that are the culprit.
     
  5. ShootsDucks

    ShootsDucks Senior Refuge Member

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    More tainted information is how that needs to read. How sad that some commercial pet catalog site was chosen to sit atop the forum as an authority on what?s best for our pets. :( At least they don?t try to hide who they?re loyal to when they feature (for example) the traditional yearly vaccine protocol that vaccine manufacturers have always recommended, despite the lack of scientific studies to back it up.
    This despite a disclaimer further down the page about AVMA (and several other veterinary university?s) studies showing dogs ?may not need to be boostered yearly.? Fact is many vet universities have discarded the old baseless protocol.

    My personal favorite though is their recommendation that carnivores should not eat bones and fat [trimmings]. :l According to these industry friendly vets, it appears carnivores the world over would be safer and healthier if kibble was air dropped over the countryside in the hope that cats (for example) would avoid the dangerous and unhealthy habit that they were designed for of eating birds and mice. :rolleyes:

    Of course in accord with the original post, the intent here is to include more information. :tu
     
  6. maxflight

    maxflight Elite Refuge Member

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    probably because grapes can ferment and dogs dont have the amino acids to break it down., or maybe they need someone to peel them... just kidding:grvn
     
  7. jdavis92

    jdavis92 Elite Refuge Member

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    I have heard that salmon is ok as long as it is from Alaska. I know that sounds like an ad for the Alaskan fish council, but it has something to do with the spawning habits of fish in the lower 48. It differs from the habits of the Alaskan salmon.

    I also know that fresh water fish is ok as well.

    Alot of foods carry an inherent risk to dogs and to people. I am under the impression that the amount of the food you give them can cause more problems than the food itself.

    Like chocolate. It is poisonous to people as well as dogs. Our systems just handle it better than dog's systems.

    Jeff in Flagstaff
     
  8. kstatemallards

    kstatemallards Elite Refuge Member

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    My dog has eaten plenty of grapes and she's still kickin
     
  9. Silencer

    Silencer Elite Refuge Member

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  10. dosch

    dosch Elite Refuge Member

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    This whole "raisin and grape" thing has got me going!!!! :grvn

    I fed my buddies wife's annoying chihuahua a hand full of grapes just the other day.....:l :clap

    Great thread on these foods...people spend too much money on their buddies(dogs) to accidentally feed them a potential life threatening food. My theory is, just feed'em the dog food and treats(Biscuits) and that's all....no table scraps in my house!!!

    Kudos to this thread! :tu
     

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