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Contacting Landowners

Discussion in 'Canadian Hunters Forum' started by Spencer5100, Jul 3, 2017.

  1. Spencer5100

    Spencer5100 Elite Refuge Member

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    Hi everyone,
    I will be making a trip to AB at the end of September and have purchased the RM maps for all of the area that I am looking to cover during the course of my trip. However, thus far I have been unable to figure out the best way to contact a landowner after determining that they own a piece of property that I would like to hunt. I sent an email to the municipality office for the area that I will be starting in about phone books, but have not received a response.

    Will websites like whitepages.com be sufficient for getting phone numbers/addresses, or should I look into finding a physical copy of a local phonebook? If the latter, any help on where to find them or other information about how to contact landowners would be tremendously helpful.

    Thank you very much!
     
  2. mink creek drake

    mink creek drake Senior Refuge Member

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    Scout first. Waste of time to contact landowners now. Reasons. Field might be fallow this year, field might not be harvested when you arrive, maybe crop was flax or canola, probably farm is farmed by a renter who controls hunting, farm may be posted, or there may not be any birds in that area. Wait until you get there and scout. It will not be difficult to find who is in charge then.
     
    avianelimanator likes this.
  3. Native NV Ducker

    Native NV Ducker Mod-Duck Hunters Forum, Classifieds, and 2 others Moderator Flyway Manager

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    I don't think he wants to contact them now. He wants to know HOW to contact them after he gets there.

    Spencer, contact the Chamber of Commerce offices in the cities you plan to be close to. I just wait till I get up there, they always have a stack of PB's by the door. I don't know if you can get them in advance.

    We use phone books about 40% of the time. Usually, we knock on the closest door and ask about the property. They either own the property, or know who does. Then, they invite you in for coffee. Nice people.
     
  4. gdluck

    gdluck Elite Refuge Member

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    true statement. when you do that plan on not hunting that field till next afternoon or the second day. you willnot get out of the house in time to ask permission.
     
  5. Chris Benson

    Chris Benson Elite Refuge Member

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    Yes, the best route to go is when you find a property you want to hunt, use your landowner map to see who is listed as the owner. Then look in the white pages for that landowner. Sometimes you are lucky and the property owner just lives down the road in the same town as the property. Failing that, go knock on the nearest farm door and ask if they know who the owner is for said property and if they have a phone number for them. Always good to introduce yourself, and why you are wanting to get in touch with the owner. Alot of times landowners won't allow deer hunters on their property because they are saving it for family, but ducks they could careless about. Like anything be polite, and respectful.
     
  6. GUNNERX2

    GUNNERX2 Elite Refuge Member

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    Maybe it's just me but if someone wants to hunt my property, I want a face to face, not a phone call. Face to face is a probable, phone call is always a no.
     
  7. Native NV Ducker

    Native NV Ducker Mod-Duck Hunters Forum, Classifieds, and 2 others Moderator Flyway Manager

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    Depends on a lot of things. Sometimes they are harvesting. Cell call is a lot easier than stopping that harvester. Sometimes, the owner is in town, 20 miles away. We have used both options, with equal success and failure.
     
  8. Chris Benson

    Chris Benson Elite Refuge Member

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    Yes, however the neighbor is not always comfortable giving out where the landowner lives, I also prefer face to face if the farm is near by, but like Native NV Ducker said fall is busy for farmers and last thing you want to do pull them away from their farm duties. Got to see what is going on and make the best choice based on that.

    If meeting face to face, always bring a kid and get them to ask permission. No way the farmer can say no to that! ;)
     
  9. Spencer5100

    Spencer5100 Elite Refuge Member

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    Lots of good information here. Really, really appreciate all of the responses guys. To clarify, Native NV's assumption is correct. I am not planning on contacting landowners now, just hoping to have my process dialed in advance so I am not burning valuable hours figuring it out during the limited time that I have up there.

    I definitely agree with the comments around using face-to-face as the first approach and not contacting via phone whenever possible. That being said, I can also see myself in a situation where a phone number is all I have. If I do find myself in that situation, my first inclination would be to call the landowner on the phone, and politely ask if they wouldn't mind sharing their address and a good time to stop by with me so that I can introduce myself in person and explain to them what I would like to do, any do's and don'ts, anything I can do to help make it worth their time, etc. Any thoughts on this approach if knocking on the closest door or attempting to find the landowner's house is not fruitful?

    One other thing that I would love to hear some thoughts on is hunting birds over water. A lot of guys say that farmers don't like it, but I see tons of pictures and hear tons of guys talking about hunting ducks over the potholes up there. What has your experience been in terms of farmer sentiment towards hunting birds over water? I have zero intention of being that guy that blows thousands of birds out of the area by shooting them in the last 5 minutes of shooting time as they come back to their roost. However, is it generally considered to be acceptable to hunt them over a watering hole that they are using mid-day between trips to their feeding field?

    Again, thank you for your responses. I am driving myself crazy trying to get prepared for my first pilgrimage to the PPR, and every additional piece that I can add to the puzzle before I am actually up there helps.
     
  10. GUNNERX2

    GUNNERX2 Elite Refuge Member

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    I don't think it's the farmers so much but other hunters (mostly locals). Our last trip up, we shot a water hole (with the farmer's permission) and faced a storm from other hunters when we got back to the trucks. They were lined up, waiting for a crack at us. I thought the whole situation was going to turn ugly and physical. The water we shot was not a roost but most field hunters are pretty strong on their feelings about hunting over any water.
     

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