Coyote problems

Discussion in 'The Duck Hunters Forum' started by cholt, Jan 31, 2018.

  1. Pirogue

    Pirogue Senior Refuge Member

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    Really doubt your pup got parvo from the coyotes ....if the yotes had parvo ....you wouldn't have a coyote problem!!! Think about it ,

    P
     
  2. Pirogue

    Pirogue Senior Refuge Member

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    The Back Side of Mingo,SEMO

    Most likely the neighbors mutt had the parvo virus

    P
     
  3. JohnBZ

    JohnBZ Elite Refuge Member

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    I've got a bunch of coyotes hanging arund my chicken pen and rabbit barn at night. I've had enough. The coyotes seem to hang around one of my apple trees located near both the rabbits and chickens. I put out a #3 duke leg hold and put a duck wing above it in the tree and put a frozen puck of concentrated duck broth in a crotch for scent. I have the .22 loaded with cb's waiting.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2018
  4. J.Bennett

    J.Bennett Elite Refuge Member

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    Around here they like to tear up the drip lines in the vineyards... So coyote chews a drip line, tractor with an air-blast rig behind it drives into to mud hole that the coyote created by chewing the drip line at 4:00 AM and sinks down to the axles... Best case scenario is that it happens on flat ground and you’re out a few yards of drip hose and some emitters and you lose a couple hours of running time getting it out. Worst case scenario is it happens on a hill, the tractor and spray rig roll, taking out 6 or 8 vines, wrecking the tractor and/or spray rig and the guy driving the tractor gets injured or worse.

    Coyotes love drip hose like mice and rats love tanglefree decoy line.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2018
  5. isu22andy

    isu22andy Refuge Member

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    Have em eat a 1000 dollar calf and then think that, kill em all.
     
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  6. WoodieSC

    WoodieSC North/South Carolina Flyway Forum Moderator Flyway Manager

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    Bingo. I've tried to tell the guy who is leasing the fields next door and has a lot of cattle on the 200 acres that he needs to add some donkeys to protect the birthing cows and calves. His response was that "he didn't like donkeys".

    The result is that while there have been dozens of calves born in the past 4-6 weeks, I'm willing to bet that based just on the howling I hear almost every night that the next time I walk that acreage I'll find multiple carcasses and/or skeletons like I have in the past.

    I just fail to understand his thinking where a couple of $200 donkeys, or even some rescued ones he could get for almost free, and that eat for nothing while they roam the pastures, while protecting his cows and calves that are worth thousands, aren't worth his 'bothering with them'.

    In response to 'Troller', I enjoy the howl of the coyotes at night, including when they are obviously close to the house, but when neighbor's dogs, calves, fawns, and even birthing cows begin dying, it's time to thin the packs, and I look forward to doing so.
     
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  7. killerv

    killerv Elite Refuge Member

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    Georgia started a bounty on them last year. Every coyote killed you could take to the dnr station and for each one you got your name put in a hat for a lifetime hunting license. Unless they have stopped, they do the drawing once a month.

    I popped one awhile back with some #6 shot turkey loads at 40 yards. Dropped him in his tracks.

    There almost as bad as hogs when it comes to controlling the population. Shoot everyone you see, even if you think its going to mess up your hunt.

    We can kill 12 deer a year in Ga, we have plenty of deer. Do yotes help control the population, certainly, they are just doing what they were put here to do. But I'd rather be controlling it with my 270. We are seeing less and less yearlings and turkey the past few years on my property.
     
  8. hartfish

    hartfish Elite Refuge Member

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    Not a darn thing you can do about the coyotes except shoot fewer does.

    "We investigated whether neonate survival
    increased after coyote removal, whether coyote predation on neonates was additive to other mortality sources,
    and whether understory vegetation density affected neonate survival."
    When the objective is to increase the recruitment of white-tailed deer, we conclude that neither
    coyote control nor vegetation management appear effective."
    https://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/ja/2014/ja_2014_kilgo_002.pdf

    Regarding turkeys, you are most likely are seeing a decline in turkeys because the habitat is no longer sufficient for successful nesting or brood rearing. Lots of places--western Oklahoma and parts of Texas--have tons of turkeys and gobs of coyotes and bobcats.

    Here is a good read:
    "the first step toward increasing turkey numbers is recognizing that quality habitat - rather than fewer predators - is most often all that is needed for the birds to thrive."
    https://www.mdwfp.com/wildlife-hunt...dont-blame-predators-for-poor-turkey-habitat/
     
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  9. DANNY NEWELL

    DANNY NEWELL Elite Refuge Member

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    Thats the best advise you could get.


    Danny
     
  10. Ron Gilmore

    Ron Gilmore Elite Refuge Member

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    Predators are resilient and while I enjoy taking them out especially females, I understand that when you remove one another typically moves in. Helped with a predator study back in the late 70s into the 80s on a 4 seperate of
    sections of W
    PA! We fenced, trapped and hunted a portion of it. Another area we trapped and hunted no fence. Another area was simply fenced and trapped the rest left. During this study reproduction rates for waterfowl and upland in the total control area was 80% and the fenced and trapped was about the same slightly less. Fence was electric and discouraged most predators from going in, but some skunks would brave the fence.

    The rest we saw normal production averages for the area given predator density. What we found was that when the barriers where removed predators filled in the void quickly!
     

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