Coyotes & Fox

Discussion in 'Varmint Hunters Forum' started by creekhunter, Jan 18, 2013.

  1. creekhunter

    creekhunter New Member

    Messages:
    15
    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2012
    Location:
    georgia
    Just starting to get into predator hunting a little and was looking for any advice I can find. Going to concentrate on fox and coyotes on some land I deer hunt and was wondering if there is a "best" time of the year to try them.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. calling4life

    calling4life Elite Refuge Member

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    1,445
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2009
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Hunt them all year if legal. You are hunting predators, know that.

    They eat all year, so distress calls will work all year, they are the safe play because they are non threatening. Fox are smaller, so think rabbit, bird, squirrel, vole, mouse in distress.

    Coyotes are a little bigger, fawn, fox, pup in distress, along with the previously mentioned sounds. Now fox can also respond to this, but as a safe rule, fox get eaten/attacked by coyotes, so if you feel you may get a fox or coyote on the stand, I'd start with bird in distress, then work into more aggressive calls.

    Coyotes are breeding now, so female invitation howls, female whimpers, start thinking about challenge howls as well. When they have the pups and really cement their den site, they'll protect it.

    But go read up on this, read a lot, I use coyote vocalizations all year, I love challenge howls, but it's an aggressive call that can push some away. There isn't a hard and fast absolute rule here, I've called young dogs in with challenge howls.
    But as a "safe" rule, think challenge adult coyotes. Don't bank on a fox or pup coming in to something looking to kick their butt.

    Next, they're curious animals, so if you're having trouble, you've hunted hard a few days and nothing is responding, try baboon in distress, try a fight scene... Some growling, aggressive barks, challenge howls, pup in distress... Make it sound like a couple yotes fighting to the death, or like a yote killing a fox.

    When in doubt, leaving doesn't kill you anything, so don't be afraid to throw a hail marry with some of those "out of the norm," sounds.
     
  3. dougburris

    dougburris Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    370
    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2007
    Location:
    indiana
    set up and wind is vital
    yotes will try to wind the sound before they come in close use open ground to your downwind side when ever possible
    set up where the yote will feel safe coming in
    heavy cover is a pain with a rifle but if he gets close a shot gun with 4 buck ends his day

    besides the normal prey decoy put a crow decoy in a tree near by as a confidense decoy
    crows will always check out your set up and sounds
     
  4. creekhunter

    creekhunter New Member

    Messages:
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    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2012
    Location:
    georgia
    Thanks guys. One place I hunt has a rebounding quail population and the fox are thick. HAve seen 7 from the stand this year and have multiple cam pictures. Didn't think about going with smaller prey sounds for them....makes sense.
     
  5. HeadHunter

    HeadHunter Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    402
    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2000
    Location:
    Lawrence Kansas
    Great advice from Calling and Doug. The only thing i would add is to not blast them out with high volume calling. I have greater success with low volume calling. Too, what both have said about set up and the wind is absolute. While both use the wind to their advantage, Foxes are the most down wind critters on the planet. Watch your down wind and have shooting lanes before they get to your down wind. Too, remember that a yote will roam approx 2 sq mi a day in my neck of the woods. So, if they dont respond today, they might be out of ear shot and will respond tomorrow.

    Good luck and post back with your successes. :tu

    Mark
     
  6. Shenandoah

    Shenandoah Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    100
    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2008
    Location:
    Shenandoah Valley, Virginia
    I think the biggest thing is to consider the habitat your hunting, are you gonna be in mature hardwoods, a pine plantation, pasture land, open fields, crp fields. All of those habitats hold predators differently and they use it differently.
     
  7. Layout101

    Layout101 Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    7,321
    Joined:
    May 26, 2003
    Location:
    Mississippi Flyway
    January - February is best here with a little snow on. If we are pushing them little creek bottoms and small wood lots work best, for calling river bottoms and CRP are the ticket. The yotes pair up hard in Feb here and we usually can get them both.
     

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