Decoy Carts

Discussion in 'Boats, Blinds, & Gadgets Forum' started by tornadochaser, Aug 14, 2017.

  1. ksgoosekillr

    ksgoosekillr Senior Refuge Member

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    Have any of you guys above ever experienced these tall skinny tire in rough/wet terrain? I have owned quite a few carts both home made and store bought. While tall and skinny might hold true for truck tires, here is the down side. Its makes the load unstable, with a high center of gravity, the spokes clog up with mud making it impossible to move, even a small branch with cause your load to want to tip over. I fixed this by widening the wheel base and then adding a disc over the spokes to reduce mud build up but still not the greatest for really bad waterfowl type terrain. Best cart ive seen used the atv turf style tires that didnt leave tracks wanted to float over the mud and no build up, guy also built a scrape bar low on the rear of the tire to prevent mud from staying on tire BUT THIS WAS FOR ATV. Nothing was or will be perfect for this, not even a sled. After i about killed myself getting a doe to the road thru a wet winter wheat field i set out to make the perfect cart/sled. Still not there yet. My idea is a taking a decoy sled and adding some racing swamp buggy wheels to it and pull that, sled will float it in deeper water, and it will go over anything.
     
    Pot Hole likes this.
  2. JDK

    JDK Moderator Moderator Flyway Manager

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    I purchased the magnum hauler two seasons ago works good but dang it is heavy with the solid rubber wheels
     
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  3. Billy Bob

    Billy Bob Elite Refuge Member

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    I bought a Herters game cart from Cabelas. skinny tires and smaller wheels. It's not top heavy and has enough clearance to not bottom out in soft cornfield mud.
     
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  4. Tuleman

    Tuleman Elite Refuge Member

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    That's pretty much the bottom line on this subject. No one type of cart will be ideal for all situations, heck one cart won't be ideal for any ONE situation! There will always have to be compromises.

    Deep and/or sticky mud will be a problem with any wheeled device. That's why I like a cart that holds a sled; when I get to the muddy part, I just take the sled off and keep going. The cart has always been there when I came back after the hunt. :tu

    Two things about small-diameter wheels/tires: the lower the axle height, the more you will be pushing DOWN on the cart as you push it. This tends to drive the cart DOWN into the terrain (sand, mud, grass, etc.). The solution is to PULL a small-tired cart. That way you are pulling UP on it. Problem is, pulling is not always the best way to get the cart to your destination.
    The second problem with them is that they won't roll over rocks (even small rocks on hard ground will hang them up), crawdad hills, small holes, sticks, etc. like a larger-tired cart will. Like I said: everything is a compromise.
     
    longduck and Billy Bob like this.
  5. Tailfeathers

    Tailfeathers Elite Refuge Member

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    I got fed up with mud and tires and pulling a cart so I made one of these.......NOT :sp
     
  6. denduke

    denduke Senior Refuge Member

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    Last edited: Oct 19, 2017
  7. longduck

    longduck Senior Refuge Member

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    That's what I have. Love it! ;)
     
  8. Tailfeathers

    Tailfeathers Elite Refuge Member

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    I see jogging strollers and also those things you pull behind a bike with kids in it at Good Will. Cheap, like $10 - $20.
     
  9. freefall

    freefall Elite Refuge Member

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    I've used wheelchair tires for years with great results.
     
  10. lab1

    lab1 Elite Refuge Member

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    I picked up a used wheelchair from our local goodwill store for $20. Took off the tires and used them, so far it is working great.
     

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