Devos Thinks Black Colleges Exemplify School Choice

Discussion in 'Political Action Forum' started by h.hobsen, Mar 1, 2017.

  1. Ron Gilmore

    Ron Gilmore Elite Refuge Member

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    Racism caused them to provide a different choice, which is what she was pointing out, and has made clear, hobs regardless of what she says you are going to spin it. You cry racism, but school choice gives those stuck in racially segregated schools because of makeup a choice. Just like the creation of black colleges did . I know that my friend Willie's family would love to be able to send their kids to a different school than they go to. They are black and want their black children out of the cesspool school that I think she said is 91% black with the rest of the makeup a mix of other ethnic groups.

    Yeah she is a racist for wanting her kids to go to a better school and not with other black kids like hers!!!

    That is where you fail in the argument hobs! History is a great teacher when you don't change it to fit a narrative that you want to drive.
     
  2. chuam

    chuam Elite Refuge Member

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    Your mental gymnastics are astounding.
     
  3. Ron Gilmore

    Ron Gilmore Elite Refuge Member

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    Lol! Non starter BS flaming out, actually didn't even spark.
     
  4. KENNEDY63

    KENNEDY63 Elite Refuge Member

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    In Praise of Edison Jackson
    Bethune-Cookman’s president stands up for Betsy DeVos.


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    Bethune-Cookman University President Edison O. Jackson, right, appeals to protesters disrupting Education Secretary Betsy DeVos's speech in Daytona Beach, Fla., May 10. Photo: Associated Press
    May 12, 2017 6:59 p.m. ET
    40 COMMENTS
    As if we needed another example of civility gone off the rails at America’s institutions of higher learning, the treatment given Education Secretary Betsy DeVos this week at Bethune-Cookman University deserves special mention.

    Edison O. Jackson, the president of Bethune-Cookman, a historically black institution of higher education, invited Mrs. DeVos to be the schools commencement speaker. As she began, many students screamed at her and turned their backs to the stage. So it went for nearly the whole speech.

    President Jackson, let it be noted, defended the Secretary at her side, and the school’s faculty stood onstage in solidarity with him.

    The irony here is that Mrs. DeVos has dedicated her adult life to improving educational opportunities for inner-city black children, specifically so they can qualify for a higher education and the lifetime of benefits that brings.

    We are reaching the limits of political polarization when it turns this self-defeating.

    Appeared in the May. 13, 2017, print edition.
     
    widgeon likes this.
  5. widgeon

    widgeon Elite Refuge Member

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    So I'm confused. Are blacks for or against segregation?
     
  6. KENNEDY63

    KENNEDY63 Elite Refuge Member

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    I'm sure that the perpetually aggrieved and offended amongst us will chime in shortly.
     
  7. H20DAD

    H20DAD Elite Refuge Member

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    The thing that upsets me the most about all of these situations is the African American students who wear African tribal garments. They are too ignorant to realize that those colors are of the tribes that captured their ancestors and put them into slavery.

    I am not upset that they hate white people, I am not upset that they want to find their African roots, I am upset for them that they are so ignorant to their history that they praise the people that put them in their position of powerlessness.
     
  8. 10GAGENUT

    10GAGENUT Elite Refuge Member Flyway Manager

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    The Future of America looks bright, I wonder if they went out afterward rioted ,looted and burned the town down in the name of racial equality :clap:clap
     
  9. Dirtybird420

    Dirtybird420 Senior Refuge Member

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    Every thing in the world is equal opportunity at this point. There's majority black schools because that's where they want to go. B it they live near there or there friends go there it is what it is. Every thing in the world basically like being around its own kind idk why it's segregation when it's humans. This kind of stuff along with Russia n the other handful of useless things are taking away from the bigger issues.
     
  10. KENNEDY63

    KENNEDY63 Elite Refuge Member

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    The DeVos Guidance Speech
    The Education Secretary takes on Obama’s assault on campus due process.


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    Education Secretary Betsy DeVos speaks at George Mason University in Arlington, Va., Sept. 7. Photo: Jacquelyn Martin/Associated Press
    By The Editorial Board
    Sept. 7, 2017 7:17 p.m. ET

    Education Secretary Betsy DeVos on Thursday gave one of the most important and defining speeches to emerge from the Trump Administration. It deserves to be read in full.

    Her subject, long anticipated in the academic community, was the Obama Education Department’s 2011 “guidance letter” to all institutions of higher learning on conducting investigations of sexual abuse under the federal education law known as Title IX. As expected, Mrs. DeVos and the head of her civil-rights office, Candice Jackson, intend to replace the current Title IX guidance after a period of public comment. The DeVos speech, however, was about much more than a bureaucratic revision.

    Let’s review the origins of the 2011 guidance letter. Its nominal purpose was to address unanswered complaints on campuses by victims of sexual assault—a real problem.

    The Obama Education Department’s response was to circumvent Congress and neglect normal executive-branch rule-making procedures mandated in the Administrative Procedure Act, such as soliciting public comment. Instead, it simply jammed the policy through by sending out a “Dear Colleague” letter, including an explicit threat that noncomplying schools could lose federal funding.

    Mrs. DeVos’s speech is a meticulous deconstruction of the damage done when progressive activists like those who populated the Obama Administration believe their ends justify whatever legal and administrative obliteration it takes.

    “Rather than engage the public on controversial issues, the (Obama) Department’s Office for Civil Rights has issued letters from the desks of unelected and unaccountable political appointees,” Mrs. DeVos said. “Instead of working with schools on behalf of students, the prior administration weaponized the Office for Civil Rights to work against schools and against students.”

    With the original Dear Colleague letter, the Obama Administration introduced a new judicial standard, in which students accused of sexual misconduct could be severely punished based on a mere “preponderance of evidence.” Mrs. DeVos noted that these high-stakes cases—with lifetime consequences for both sides—are brought before a “school administrator who will act as judge and jury.”

    The result, unsurprisingly, has been a travesty of injustice, incompetence and inconsistency as schools struggled to comply. Many institutions, often small colleges with limited resources, are now engulfed in lawsuits flowing, again unsurprisingly, from these kangaroo courts.

    Secretary DeVos opened her speech with the hope that “every person—even those who feel they disagree—will lend an ear to what I outline today.” It is a faint hope.

    Even before she gave the speech, 20 Democratic attorneys general, of all people, wrote a letter warning against “a rushed, poorly-considered effort to roll back current policies.” After the speech, teachers union president Lily Eskelsen Garcia of the National Education Association said the DeVos proposal to rethink sexual-assault adjudication “offends our collective conscience.”

    Well, hers anyway—this from a union that makes it nearly impossible to dismiss incompetent or even rule-breaking teachers.


    Mrs. DeVos in her address goes more than the extra mile to include the valid concerns of victims, the accused, their parents, school administrators and what used to be commonly held notions of decency and justice.

    The secretary deserves credit for taking on this legal and administrative nightmare, which she inherited from an Administration that specialized in creating them. She deserves support from the academic community in finding a way back to a solution.

    Appeared in the September 8, 2017, print edition.
     

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