Duck gizzards any recipes?

Discussion in 'Cooking Forum' started by H20DAD, Jun 6, 2017.

  1. H20DAD

    H20DAD Elite Refuge Member

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    Along the lines of the pluck or breast thread, do any of you have any recipes that aren't deep frying?

    I sadly don't save them and cut up a few to educate my novice hunters how the birds eat and process food.

    The gizzards on whistling ducks look wonderful and now that I know the vacuum sealer will save them from freezer burn I plan on saving them all this year.

    Any ideas greatly appreciated so as to keep my kids eating more duck.
     
  2. California Flyway

    California Flyway Elite Refuge Member

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    Gizzards, hearts and livers go to my Spaniels. They earn that share. I boil them and add the parts and stock to their kibble.
    Go team.
     
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  3. H20DAD

    H20DAD Elite Refuge Member

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    Sounds like you are a kind owner. I can't bring myself to hunt a dog here because of the gators.

    Had an ~13 footer go past my teal spot on a big lake down here last year.
     
  4. DComeaux

    DComeaux Senior Refuge Member

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    Dirty rice, or rice dressing as I call it, is where the hearts and gizzards go some of the time. We also cook them low and long in our duck gravy's (pot roast). All is fork tender when we're done.



    http://honest-food.net/dirty-rice-recipe/


    Ingredients
    • 1 1/2 cups long-grain rice
    • 3 tablespoons duck fat, lard or vegetable oil
    • 1/2 to 1 cup livers from birds, or about 3 ounces deer liver
    • 1/2 to 1 pound of ground meat from gizzards and hearts or any other ground meat
    • Salt
    • 1 1/2 cups meat broth
    • 1/2 cup finely chopped onion
    • 2 celery stalks, finely chopped
    • 1/2 cup finely chopped green pepper
    • 1 to 3 hot chiles anywhere from Tabasco to jalapeno, finely chopped
    • 2 garlic cloves, minced
    • 1 to 2 tablespoons Cajun seasoning
    • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
    • 4 green onions. chopped
    Instructions
    1. Cook the rice as usual. Move the cooked rice to a sheet pan and lay it out to cool. You need to start with cool rice. And yes, you can do this step a day ahead if you want.
    2. If you are using gizzards, clean them of grit and that silver membrane and either chop fine or grind in a meat grinder. A meat grinder is better, but not everyone has one. Alternately, you can use any ground meat. Either finely grind or finely chop the livers.
    3. Heat the duck fat over medium-high heat and, when it is hot, add the ground gizzards and the chopped livers. Toss to coat in the fat and then let them sit a bit to develop a crust on the bottom of the pan. Stir only occasionally, as you want to develop a good crust. If your Cajun seasoning isn't salty, salt the meat now.
    4. Pour about 1/4 cup of the broth into the pan and use it to scrape up the browned bits on the bottom of the pan. Add the onion, peppers, celery and garlic. Mix to combine and Cook for a solid 3 to 5 minutes, until the vegetables are soft.
    5. Sprinkle over the oregano and the Cajun seasoning and let a crust form on the bottom of the pan again. When it does, add the rest of the broth and the rice and mix to combine. Scrape the bottom of the pan again. When the liquid has almost totally evaporated, mix in the green onions. You're ready when the liquid has all evaporated. Serve hot.

    Serve this on its own for a light dinner, or as a side dish to gumbo, or roast birds or venison.

    For both recipes you can improvise according to your taste. The gizzards will be tender in this "rice and gravy". I like a side of sweet potato, cooked down in their own syrup with added brown sugar, and cabbage slaw with vinegar, salt and black pepper.


    http://www.cajuncookingrecipes.com/wildgamerecipes/cajun-duck-rice-gravy.htm
     
  5. sleeping_dogs

    sleeping_dogs Senior Refuge Member

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    We had a caretaker at our duck cluck that pickled the hearts, livers and gizzards in gallon glass jars. It looked absolutely gross.
     
  6. California Flyway

    California Flyway Elite Refuge Member

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    Sleeping Dog,
    My guess is the caretaker was a little pickled too as many of them are in my experience.:l:sp
     
  7. H20DAD

    H20DAD Elite Refuge Member

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    Thank you, Dcomeaux
     
  8. salthunter

    salthunter Moderator Moderator

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    40 years ago. we use to have coot shoots. the livers went for fox bait.
    My dad pickled the hearts and gizzards. They were quite tasty
     
  9. OneShotBandit

    OneShotBandit Elite Refuge Member

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    When I was in AR some time ago at the duck pickers the old black gentleman was frying some gizzards w/season salt & pepper. I didn't think they were all that bad to the horror of my hunting buddy! :)
     
  10. mw1

    mw1 New Member

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    This one takes a little planning ahead, cover them in mayo, leave them in the fridge over night, then season them with Badia Complete Seasoning and your choice of another seasoning and grill them. I do it with chicken gizzards all the time, the mayo sounds gross but you can't taste it and makes them much less tough. I hate mayo, btw.
     

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