Duck gizzards any recipes?

Discussion in 'Cooking Forum' started by H20DAD, Jun 6, 2017.

  1. H20DAD

    H20DAD Elite Refuge Member

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    Me too. But I have some, so I'll try it. Thank you
     
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  2. mw1

    mw1 New Member

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    You don't need a lot of mayo, just enough to cover them, what I do is lay my meat out on some foil, and scoop some mayo from the jar on top and mix them with my hands. Kinda messy but worth it if you, like me, like the taste but don't like the toughness of gizzards
     
  3. Native NV Ducker

    Native NV Ducker Mod-Duck Hunters Forum, Classifieds, and 2 others Moderator Flyway Manager

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    Put pieces in enough water to cover, add 3-5 TB of Baking Soda. Stir up, and let sit for about 20-30 minutes. Rinse well. Prepare any way you want, but now you don't need to cook em 'low and slow'. You will be able to cut em with a butter knife.
     
  4. mw1

    mw1 New Member

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    Just out of curiosity, have you ever tried this with any other food? For instance, chicken thighs or wings?
     
  5. Native NV Ducker

    Native NV Ducker Mod-Duck Hunters Forum, Classifieds, and 2 others Moderator Flyway Manager

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    I use it several times a week. All my beef, pork, chicken breasts, and especially wild game, gets this treatment.
    Tender cuts (chicken breast) can go for 15- 20 minutes. Tough cuts (Canada Goose) needs to go for 30 minutes.
    You know that good Chinese S&S Pork you get at the restaurant, the kind that just melts in your mouth. That is what this process does.
    Not my idea, the America's Test Kitchen talks about it often.
    NOT for thick cuts, like a steak, or roast. Thin cuts, cubes, no more than 1" square. Most of my stuff is 3/4". Thin, flat, and long is ok also.

    My customers wonder why I duck/goose hunt, as they think ducks are nasty tasting. I always make more than we can eat, and bring samples in the next day. Even cold, it isn't chewy. They think it is antelope, or moose, or elk. When I tell them it is duck, or goose, they don't believe me. Usually, after the soak, I just toss in either flour, or corn starch, get the pan past smoking hot, and sear the meat off. Small pieces cook fast. Throw some sauce over it, and serve over noodles or rice.
    Just be sure to rinse well.
     
  6. mw1

    mw1 New Member

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    Wow, I'll have to give that a try. My dad does BBQ competitions and one of our biggest challenges is getting the skin on chicken thighs to not completely pull off after the second bite, because it ruins your non-taste score. Like I had said, that's where the mayo came in and out of curiousity I tried to basically marinate gizzards overnight in mayo and they turned out great
     
  7. bullpinnie

    bullpinnie Elite Refuge Member

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    Dirty Rice, or gumbo are the best ways to use gizzards.

    You can also make giblet gravy that is good on almost anything.......

    quarter them, and soak them in salt water, then give them a good rise to make sure there isn't any grit in them.
    Simmer ( as low as you can get) with fresh garlic, green onions, celery, and carrots, bay leaves, and black peppercorns for an hour. then remove the gizzards, raise the heat, and reduce the broth by half.


    Run gizzards through grinder.
    make medium blonde roux out of equal parts butter ( or bacon fat), and flour, , then strain warm broth into warm roux. add ground gizzards, and season with salt, and lots of ground pepper. add 1/2 cup heavy cream, to finish.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2017

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