duck lens?

Discussion in 'Photography Forum' started by DEHC, Feb 16, 2018.

  1. DEHC

    DEHC New Member

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    Louisiana
    New to photography, but not new to getting close to ducks.
    I've shot some decent pics this season with my Cannon Rebel T6 and the "kit" 300 MM 4-5.6 lens, but need a longer lens to shoot better pics from far away (100 yards).
    In the neighborhood of $1000 and less, what is a good type of lens or specs that I should be looking at?
    Many thanks!
     
  2. Rubberhead

    Rubberhead Elite Refuge Member

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    Location:
    Moncks Corner, SC
    Quick Answer: Used 400mm F/5.6L...or a used 300mm F/4.0L IS...I know you're already shooting 300mm but the much better quality of the L lenses will allow you to crop closer and the f/4@300mm will speed up the set-up.

    Truth: There's almost never enough focal length for wild bird photography especially with a $1k budget...

    Long Answer: I don't know how "deep" you are into photography but the trade-offs for bird photography are focal length, maximum aperature and lens weight (and cost for most of us)...however, there is a way to compensate for a lot of these with a "better" camera. Unfortunately, you can't compensate for a cheap lens with a better camera. A higher usable ISO will compensate for a faster lens (larger aperature / smaller F-stop number) and more megapixels can allow for closer cropping and "lengthen" the usable focal length.

    There are two things to realize: 1) higher usable ISO can compensate for the speed of a lens but does not increase the depth of field of the lens, 2) more megapixels is non-linear so it suffers from diminishing returns, actually the square root of the number of megapixels is the direct comparison. Meaning that the 4 megapixels from 8MP to 12MP are add more crop factor than the 6MP from 18MP to 24MP.

    I can't make the decision for you but if you're going to get more serious about wildlife photography you're going to have to upgrade your lens and camera. Since lens specs and costs change slowly while camera specs and costs change very rapidly - you're better off upgrading your lens first...see the quick answer...
     
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  3. Lowtide

    Lowtide Elite Refuge Member

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    My wife and I both use Nikon D7200s. I got a Tamron 150-600 g2 for her and she has been pleased with it. I went with the 2nd generation because it has weather sealing and the autofocus is supposed to be better than the first generation. I ran across a used Sigma C 150-600 for a good price so I picked that up for me to use. I am very happy with it so far. The Sigma C (contemporary) does not have weather sealing like the Sigma Sport model, but it is about half the cost at $989.00 new.
     
  4. MOOSEMAN

    MOOSEMAN New Member

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    If you can find a good 100-400 L Series, you can usually get them around $900. I have one and like it but of course would like even more.
     
  5. Rubberhead

    Rubberhead Elite Refuge Member

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    Good point - I should have mentioned that one too.
     
  6. Lame-Duck

    Lame-Duck Elite Refuge Member

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    I completely agree with MOOSEMAN. It is the lens I use most for bird shooting.
     

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