Effect on wounding...

Discussion in 'Diver Hunters Forum' started by seaduckhunt, Dec 12, 2016.

  1. seaduckhunt

    seaduckhunt Elite Refuge Member Sponsor

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    So some time back, a seminar was held in Denmark regarding the wounding effect of eiders. I was contacted for the use of one of my decoying and shooting pictures of Eiders to illustrate their seminar booklets and use in the talks....

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  2. John Singer

    John Singer Senior Refuge Member

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    Ruben, from the article, it appears that the Danes instituted an "action plan" that greatly reduced the wounding of eiders.

    Do you know anything about the details of that action plan?
     
  3. seaduckhunt

    seaduckhunt Elite Refuge Member Sponsor

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    No, this was a few years ago, and after selling them the photo, I lost contact. No idea about the result of the study. I'm sure it's online somewhere....
     
  4. Jerky

    Jerky Senior Refuge Member

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    That is an interesting poster presentation and a cool pic. I would argue with the author that his conclusion of the action plan having a positive effect on reducing wounding of eiders is confounded by the shortening of the season, unless of course this was a recommendation within the plan. I can think of a number of very interesting waterfowl studies to conduct if only I could find funding sources.
     
  5. seaduckhunt

    seaduckhunt Elite Refuge Member Sponsor

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    Well, someone is on a tear to reduce duck bag limits and seasons , even without good studies-- just look at what they did with the sea duck season and limits. So I'm sure if you approach the right "organization" and tell them you want to show a study that will result in a shorter duck hunting season, and bag limit, funding will fall out of the sky for you !
     
  6. Jerky

    Jerky Senior Refuge Member

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    Capt. Perez,
    It has been an interesting few years with respect to sea duck management decisions and the amount and type of data that support them. However the USFWS always errs on the side of precaution in order to maintain what we currently have in perpetuity. As a wildlife scientist I generally avoid taking pot shots at our managers with equally little or anecdotal information.
     
  7. John Singer

    John Singer Senior Refuge Member

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    I could not find the action plan for reducing crippling rates on common eiders. It does not appear to be loaded to the net yet.

    However, I found several references to an action plan intended to reduce wounding of pink foot geese.

    Here are a couple such references:

    http://pinkfootedgoose.aewa.info/node/194

    http://pinkfootedgoose.aewa.info/si...ch results_News Release_12-5-2016_FINAL_0.pdf

    Note that a major component of that action plan is to encourage hunters to limit their shots to 25 meters (about 27 yards).
     
  8. seaduckhunt

    seaduckhunt Elite Refuge Member Sponsor

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    It was not a pot shot, it was an exercise of my first amendment right ! I respect concrete data, not politically driven assumptions. Honestly, I care not to get into a back in forth on it, what's done is done...
     
  9. Jerky

    Jerky Senior Refuge Member

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    According to this publication (https://www.researchgate.net/public...wounding_of_Common_Eider_Somateria_mollissima) Danish hunters were provided an opportunity to reduce crippling rates voluntarily or face further regulation, and an information campaign was begun the year after lead shot was banned to educate hunters about the issue. Measured crippling rates were even lower than what was predicted if there was a 100% decline in crippling beginning in year 1 of the study. The author correctly identifies disease and reduced hunting could have affected the results. This is a good example of the challenges interpreting field data and the uncertainty with which management decisions must be made. Sorry to redirect the original post-your pic captures great actions and is very applicable to the material presented Ruben. I respect you sharing your opinion and don't necessarily disagree.
     
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  10. Squaller

    Squaller Elite Refuge Member

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    I bet more than a few of us would enjoy hearing what you have in mind as far as prospective studies...

    Almost every study I have seen on wounding rates of waterfowl has been a subjective study (inherently flawed by the nature of the study). Until someone comes up with a device (either visual or auditory) that can determine when a bird is hit (that does not fall), I feel we are whistling Dixie as far as trying to determine wounding rates subjectively in the field.

    Best studies I have seen were on released mallards, and the birds were inspected for pellet holes after being shot or shot at.

    Common sense tells us not to use steel #6's or F-shot as a choice for shooting these sea ducks... Pretty much everything in between is up for discussion.

    Smaller pellets have denser patterns with more head shots and broken wings, larger pellets produce better penetration into the bodies. Someone that tends to shoot the front end of birds might benefit from smaller pellet sizes (at least on the initial shot), someone who tends to body--shoot birds might benefit from larger pellets...
     
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