First ever turking hunt this spring...Excited...

Discussion in 'Turkey Hunters Forum' started by Easterncanadafowler, Jan 19, 2018.

  1. bill cooksey

    bill cooksey Elite Refuge Member

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    Seriously, get a quality glass or slate call first. I use diaphragms A TON. Probably 80% of my calling is done with one, but a glass or slate call is much easier to learn, and get consistent at three basic calls which kill turkeys: yelp, cluck and purr. Unless you are a freak of nature, you WILL NOT be able to consistently make those notes in the few months you have to practice. Not saying you can't kill a turkey with bad diaphragm calling, because there are days a turkey just seems to want to die, but I am saying your odds will go up considerably if you learn to consistently make a yelp, cluck and purr. Those aren't the only calls you'll eventually want to learn, but they'll kill the majority of callable turkeys, and you have plenty of time to learn to use one.

    Go ahead and pick up a diaphragm or two when you buy the friction call, but do as Steven say and spend all the time you can with that sucker in your mouth. Even after you think you sound like Walter Parrot in the car, be cautious about trying it in the woods. A friction call somehow still seems workable when adrenaline flows, but a diaphragm is a whole different deal. Good chance your mouth will go dry and you'll be breathing heavy, and neither of those are very good for calling.

    Finally, I don't really hold with the idea of the movement issue with friction hcalls. Unless you are set up blind-calling and a bird sneaks in unseen, it just isn't an issue, and even that isn't an issue if you address it when setting up. See, you generally shouldn't be calling at all once a bird is visible. Unless your setup is perfect, you have decoys and the turkey is very naïve, he'll pick you out even with a diaphragm. They can tell exactly where the calling is coming from, so you better either look like a hen turkey or be very invisible, and camo does not make you invisible to a turkey. Final point on that, If you call when a turkey is in view, he's going to expect a hen to be standing and visible where that sound is coming from. A high percentage of turkeys will just walk away if they don't see a hen where they should.

    Then again, you might just luck into a turkey on his death day and kill him despite doing everything wrong. It happens that way just every so often.
     
  2. stevena198301

    stevena198301 Elite Refuge Member Supporting Member

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    :clap I’ve blown it more than once, due to excitement with a mouth call.

    I’ve also blown it holding a slate in my hand and a turkey coming from nowhere, and getting rid of the slate and my gun up was just too much. The call sliding off it’s perch and making that clank on the receiver of the shotgun is incredibly loud and unnatural. :dohYou do dumb stuff in the heat of the moment.
     
  3. Fishun Injun

    Fishun Injun Senior Refuge Member

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    Ala.
    I make my own diaphragm calls....with LEAD half circles and condom rubber/gauze tape....Old School. I ate sooooo much pu... through the years I have a strong tongue which is a PLUS using a Diaphragm Call!!
     
  4. Squaller

    Squaller Elite Refuge Member

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    Some good advice given…

    I would add or reiterate:

    • Pattern your gun to see where it shoots… Generally the hold point on a turkey is right where the neck meets the feathers…. I use cheap target loads in a turkey choke to see where it is shooting; once I know where the gun is shooting, I will fire one or two actual turkey loads just to make sure it is shooting how and where I want.
    • Don’t over-call. There is an overwhelming temptation to call at a bird when it gobbles back at you every time you call. If a bird gobbles every time you call, but is not coming no closer, shut up for a bit… If he still aint’ coming closer, then get closer to him… If the bird is coming closer as you call, I might continue to do what you are doing….
    • If hens yelp back at you, imitate those hens… If you can irritate a hen, sometimes she will come in to defend her territory… The one time I will call aggressively to birds on the roost is when calling to an angry hen… If birds are “henned up” it is unlikely you will call them off of live hens, but you just might irritate a dominant hen into coming in, and the toms will be right behind her.
    • I think that the best call for a beginning caller (and still one of my favorite calls) is a box call. Tough to find a more realistic call, and impossible to find a call easier to learn. Plenty of time to learn to use pot calls and mouth calls down the road.
    • Hunting open ground, I might consider using decoys… I would go with a jake and a hen… Set up the jake where you want to shoot the bird (the toms will always address the jake decoy before the hen). If you are right handed, set the jake up slighty to your left, and within 15 yards or so…
    • Hunting heavily wooded areas, I generally do not use decoys… If a tom sees hen decoys, he might start strutting and gobbling (hanging up) just out of range, waiting for those hens to come to him… If a bird has been harassed by other toms/jakes, he might see your jake decoy and run the other way…
    • I do NOT like to call at a bird I can clearly see. If a bird is making its way towards me, I do not call. If I need to call, I wait till it is in a dip, or behind a rock, bush, or tree… If you can see him, he will be able to pinpoint you… In wooded areas (and without decoys), birds will continue forward motion looking for that hen that they cannot see, but I have found it very important not to call at birds I can clearly see… (Others might disagree).
    • When running and gunning (calling and moving trying to locate a bird), never call when you are exposed. You might be surprised by a close bird.
    • When calling most hunters like to sit against a tree (which breaks up your outlind). I believe you can call birds in from an orange car, as long as you are not moving or talking… Turkey are not like ducks, in that ducks (and geese) will be wary of large objects… You can hunt from a camouflage tent, and birds will not be put off by it… But move a finger at the wrong time, and they are out of there…. Turkeys are extremely sensitive to movement or sound… Turkey hunting is not a good time for a deep conversation with a buddy.
    • Best way to scout before the season is to get out early in the morning and just listen… If no birds are sounding off, try an owl call, crow call, goose call, or even a coyote call… If still no birds sound off, I might try a hen turkey call… I do not like to use a hen call while scouting if possible. Look for footprints on the road, and look for turkey poop and turkey feathers… (there are a number of sites that will show pictures of male verses female turkey poop)…. Make sure to taste the poop for freshness…
    • Get a good video on turkey calling and basic strategy…
     
  5. bill cooksey

    bill cooksey Elite Refuge Member

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    Squaller has a lot of good advice. I'll add to his tip about moving closer if the bird is hung up. Sometimes moving closer is the right move, but often you are better off to move to the side or even away from the bird. Moving closer sometimes reinforces the gobblers thought the hen is coming to him. Flanking him or moving away cam cause him to panic that the hen is leaving. You are also less likely to get busted.
     
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  6. mudhen

    mudhen Elite Refuge Member

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    Start with a property holding turkeys...

    Buy an old Primos Truth turkey vidja...before B-Mo’bile...watch it many times... head to the woods in the dark, and then do what they do...

    Sit there until you figure it out...might take awhile...a few hours...a few days...years...a lifetime maybe...

    Only thing I know for sure is if I hear one or see one in person, they are there that particular moment...fresh poop is good too...

    Tracks just mean they were there when they made the track...

    Learning on your own is the best part in my opinion...other folks taking you right to them is good too...
     
  7. sdkidaho

    sdkidaho Decoy, Gun Dog, Christian, Idaho, Montana/Wyoming Moderator Flyway Manager

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    Spring time... turkey love is in the air and ticks are on the ground waiting to suck your blood. I really like that I can use the permanone/permethrin when turkey hunting to avoid those nasty little critters getting on me.

    I've never killed a turkey, and haven't been turkey hunting very much, but I have thoroughly enjoyed it. It's the next best thing to bugling a bull elk when that tom thunders away at you.
     
  8. duckbuster5901

    duckbuster5901 Senior Refuge Member

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    If possible put those birds your hunting to bed night before your going to hunt. Watch from a distance to know exactly where they go to roost. Ease in if possible while pitch black next morning . It is actually fairly easy if you use cover to your advantage. Set tight and listen to the toms and hens wake up. Don't even breath hard if your within 100ys. of them! You might get lucky and on fly down they,ll set down in gun range. When I,m in really close I don,t even make soft yelps until I see which way they,re going to work. If just toms a few soft yelps and maybe a little fly down noise which can be made with a hat or a wing will usually bring them in if you can pull off the movement without being seen. Always helps to know where the birds are heading too to feed so if you cant get in position early you can get in their travel path. Most would call this way deer hunting a turkey but its just one way to kill them and sometimes the only way you,ll get an ol tom in your bag depending on pressure they,ve been under. I kill them each year this way as well as calling them in from a distance. Either way its fun, I just enjoy getting in really close on them and watching them in the trees while hidden.
     
  9. killerv

    killerv Elite Refuge Member

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    I can't wait, pulled out onto the powerline the other day and there he was in full strut with his girls. Hope the 9yo can get his first.
     
  10. killerv

    killerv Elite Refuge Member

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    As far as moving closer, if you've got a buddy with you, get him to move further back 30-40 yards or so and call and you stay put in between him and the bird, it'll put that bird that wants to hang up in your lap.
     

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