Gator Trax Vrs. GatorTail (Boats)

Discussion in 'Mud Motors' started by Waterfowl fool, Jul 21, 2013.

  1. ARguide

    ARguide Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    1,808
    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2007
    Location:
    AR
    :reader:reader

    Agreed.

    Also the extreme series will turn great.
     
  2. badhabit

    badhabit Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    5,301
    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Location:
    Yakivegas, WA
    There are Mud motor and Mud boat websites you can visit that can give you input. Mud Buddy had one they sell gator Trax and Excel and there's another MudMotor.com. Both sites can give you valuable information. Heck there may even be a "custom builder" in your area.
     
  3. sandman7655

    sandman7655 Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,181
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2004
    Location:
    south carolina
    i aint never been happy that a boat would slide at speed.if u like not having control so be it.:joker:no:z
     
  4. Redhead78

    Redhead78 Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,537
    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2007
    Location:
    Mexican on his way to Oklahoma
    I have owned a round chine GatorTrax, and a tapered chine PD. If I could do it all over again, I'd go with a square chine GTB or PD boat. From what I've seen over the past 10 years, they are all well built boats. However, for my purposes, getting a big load on plane in skinny and/or deep water is a necessity. The GatorTrax, was the absolute worst performer in this situation. With enough HP, the round chine does come on plane quicker, but with a stock engine, a similar boat with square chines will haul a load faster, plane out faster, and handle just a well in deep water turns due to the additional weight/draft of the boat when loaded. When the boats are empty during "fun runs" they all do pretty well coming up on plane, and the round chine will corner harder in deep water turns on the throttle. But once you load up for hunting season, the round chine will provide no advantage at all, and be harder to plane out and carry a load slower than a similar sized square chine. Another disadvantage to the round chine is the tendency to "walk" when turning at idle speeds. When picking up decoys, the round chine will not turn as sharply or track as straght as the squares. So, if you intend on using the boat to pick up decoys in deep water situations, I'd avoid the round chine.

    These are my opinions based upon the 10 years I've owned and ran short tail MM's. I've tested it and seen it with my own eyes, and GPS tested various loads in the boats. Those who disagree are certainly entitled to their own opinions, but this cat has been there done that, and knows better.
     
  5. Mallardmisser

    Mallardmisser Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    1,828
    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2008
    Location:
    minnesota
    My experience is just the opposite. I went from a GTB 1754 to a Phowler 1856 then a GT 1662(3 man hide). All were within a couple mph of each other. All had the same PD36 pushing them. Same 3 guys in the boat, same load, absolutely no difference in how they ran save for one thing. The GTB was faster empty, but was way lighter, by over 250 lbs than the other 2 boats. (no flotation and built lighter IMHO) Also was the only one that hooked in the hull. GT is on it's first season, so that is still a potential.

    I would be willing to wager that if the boats weigh the same and are the same size there won't be a measurable difference in performance. You can't fight physics.

    I will also firmly contend the reason MM MFRs build flat bottom boats is profit margin. As I said before, they are the easiest to build and thus have the greatest profit potential.
     
  6. gaducker

    gaducker New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2011
    Location:
    Georgia
    Also if the OP is putting on a GTR then it just makes sense to go with a GTB. Gator Tail knows best what works with their motors



    I didn't know they made a boat that would run good with a gtr on it.:sp:sp

    GATOR TRAX ROUND CHINE baby.... There is no way I would put up with how a square chine boat handles to tote a few more pounds. I have had them both also and I will never have a square chine mud boat.
     
  7. CajunDan

    CajunDan Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    6,581
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2003
    Location:
    Texas
    One thought, two outcomes.
    Your running along a open flat at 1/2 speed to wao and all of a sudden there is and obstruction that you have to miss or you and your cargo will get hurt.
    You yank the tiller to one side to miss.
    Round chine boat digs in and cuts around obstruction all at wao.
    A square chine turns side ways and you plow into it spilling all contents of boat out and onto the flat or you think about it, drop off the hammer and cut but your reflexes are to slow and you either quarter it or t-bone it, either way tossing contents out.
    Same goes with an outboard on a flat square chine boat. You yank the tiller either way in deep or shallow water and your swapping ends.
    Side swipe an abandoned crap trap half sunk in the mud and I can tell you it will chunk you out. Same goes with a step chine.
    My next boat will be a round chine boat, period.

    Sent from my C771 using Tapatalk 2
     
  8. Kman

    Kman Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    260
    Joined:
    May 14, 2003
    Location:
    Springfield, LA
    If you compare the SAME boat size with the SAME load and the SAME motor then you can compare the results. Anything else is propaganda or ignorance. You cant fight physics is one of the best statements on this thread. It is what it is guys. Round chine will turn...square wont, "tiller time" be damned.

    the difference is 1/4" in draft. I have a 17x54 Huntdeck with a 5500 mag mud buddy that will run 30mph with 5 adults....don't tell me you cant haul a load. Now if you buy an 18x62 huntdeck and try to power it with a 35 and 5 guys, please don't blame it on the round chine when you don't get the performance you want. A square wont be any better.

    Ive built them all and run them all....I cant speak for other "cats", but I DARN sure know better. I invite anyone that disagrees to come on by the Gator Trax factory in springfield, bring 4 of your stout buddies and let me SHOW you what an 18.5 foot round chine boat will do with a load. Talk is cheap.
     
  9. leaky wader

    leaky wader Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    6,405
    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2002
    Location:
    see'n the outdoors thru the eyes of my girl
    I tried to stay out of this potential melee because most know I am a dealer for G Trax and my statements will be considered biased by most.

    Having said that up front, things are what they are guys, I will agree with the statement that a rounded chined,smooth-bottomed hull will not track "true" at idle speeds. But lets keep things real..a square chined smooth-bottom hull doesn't do that much better. you wanna track true you'd better think about getting a "Vee bottomed hull" or at the least a crimped bottomed jon boat. I've been fishing in all so I know what is what. As far as load carrying, again I have been in both. A rounded chined hull only drafts, like Kent said, about a 1/4" more than a square. This rumor, fib, bull*****, whatever you wanna call it has been spread around the mm community for too long. Again, I have been in both chined hulls with nearly identical setups and weight and it ain't "several inches" like some claim. Again, math physics don't lie and my eyes don't deceive me either..... I have 20/20 vision.

    As far as out of the hole with a load, again I challenge anyone with a square chined hull setup identical to a rounded chined hull to hang the same motor on the back, load it up with the same passenger/gear load and compare. I've hung many a short tails on the back of customers boats of both chines and ran with them. Both come up on pad equally quick all things being even. In keeping my statements fair and honest, I will say this, the G Trax boats and other mud boat manufacturer hulls that are designed with the "cut back" transom on the bottom do come up a tad slower. This has absolutely nothing to do with the chines though. Rather that design will cause the boat to rock back and "sit" momentarily when a handful of throttle is grabbed thus slowing the rear end from coming up. But again, all things being equal, including straight cut transoms, on a rounded vs a square chined hull you ain't gonna see much of a difference if any.

    Here is what you do gain with a rounded chined hull though. The ability to turn on rails..and it don't have to be water deeper than 2' like someone posted. that's a ridiculous statement that only shows the ridiculous heresay that is continuously spread thru the mm community. I tested this minimum water needed theory when I moved up from a 1744 to a 1750. I wanted things to be fair and this boat size is about the avg bottom width of most boats running today. I started in 2 feet of water. Ran the motor up to WOT and threw the tiller to the port side. It grabbed so hard I'm glad I was hanging onto the grab bar. Did that again and again each time getting shallower and it wasn't until I hit about 8-9" of water when the rear end finally "broke" and I slid. but know that I was doing 35 mph when it broke so my speed played a factor in it breaking at this depth. Any depth above that and the boat was on rails and cut like a knife. I realized that I had to be deep enough for the chines to roll and have enough to "bite on". Again that was at about the 8-9" mark and hauling azz.

    Also, sliding up, over, off of logs, ditch banks or whatever is that much better with a rounded chine. You don't have the hard edges of a square chine to dig into the bottom like grader blades. Spinning your boat, getting unstuck is much easier as well. I can run my rig up on tacky mud, jump out and spin it around all day. You ain't doing that with the "grader blades" of a square chined hull. And sometimes that helps wiggling out from being stuck where even a reverse feature would do you no good.

    Now please don't take this as a knock on a square chined hull. Both will get you where you need to go. But I just wanted to help clarify any misinformation that is STILL being put out there.
     
  10. Redhead78

    Redhead78 Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,537
    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2007
    Location:
    Mexican on his way to Oklahoma
    Like I said earlier, there will be other opinions out there. Some opinions are from regular guys that have owned both and some are from guys who sell or manufacture boats and support their "brand." It has always been that way on these forums, and always will be. I guess we can all be thankful that we as Americans get to choose. And that is good news for many as there has been a good number of guys that have switched MM brands and boat brands over the years to find what works best for them. I happen to be one of them. I enjoyed my GatorTrax boat, and it was very well built. It just didn't perform for me as well as my PD boat does with stock MM's.

    It is up to each individual to pick the boat and MM combo that fits their particular needs. I've shared my opinions based upon my expereinces. I've got nearly 1000 hrs on various MM rigs. Not as many as some guys, and certainly not as many as Kent or Rick, but enough to earn the right to share my experiences on this forum. Those who are reading this can agree or disagree, to each their own.

    Also, I don't buy the profit margin arguement. As was said earlier, GoDevil has made round chine boats for years, and they went with a square chine on their surface drive hulls. If they wanted to make round chine, it wouldn't be difficult, but they have chosen to go with what performs best with their MM design. I also don't think PD or GatorTail would consider saving a few bucks on manufacturing costs if they believed a square chined hull was inferior in performance. These are competetive folks that want to build the best boat/motor combo they possibly can, so don't try to tell me they are more interesed in a few extra $'s than building the best boat they are capable of.



    Edit: One other thing I forgot to mention was the quality of the ride. In my older GatorTrax, the water would come up the side of the hull and often splash the driver. One weekend at Niobrara, returning to the boat ramp in a diagonal cross wind, I got absolutely soaked by the water splashing off the gunnel. That particular instance was worse than most, but it was a fairly common issue. I have noticed that on many of the newer GatorTrax models they are building a crimp into the size to divert water spray, so it may not be an problem anymore. My hull was smooth all the way from the bend to the gunnel cap and it could get you wet with wrong wind direction. I've not driven a newer GatorTrax hull with the crimped sides, but I'm sure they have addressed that issue in the newer designs.
     

Share This Page