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Goose hunting Saskatchewan.

Discussion in 'Canadian Hunters Forum' started by Lewx4, Nov 26, 2017.

  1. Geez n Quackers

    Geez n Quackers Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    797
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2000
    Location:
    Kansas City, MO
    I always take two guns. Primary and a backup. The form to have authority to have a gun in Canada is $25 whether it's one gun or two. I would take at least two boxes of ammo for each day I were going to be hunting. So 1-1/2 to 2 cases for your trip if I were you. Duty is only about 6% for ammo above 8 boxes per hunter.

    Personally, I always found sleeping accommodations quite affordable. I never had to change locations, but the place we stay would not charge us if we left earlier than our days reserved. Many places are quite flexible. Food is a little higher than here in the states, but we eat a lot of our birds while there. Gas is higher at close to $4 per gallon (equivalent), but I think the amount of driving you have to do to scout is way overblown. It's big country, but you are going to a relatively known area and from there it's not that hard to find hunting opportunities in a typical year. Knowing your area minimizes windshield time. Just like anywhere you hunt. Exchange rate this past year was over 20% so that's a discount on everything you spend up there.

    One thing I have always done is take something to the farmers after the hunt. For me, after a good hunt, it's a case of beer and some Kansas City BBQ. And they remember us in following years for that. This past fall, we got permission on a good feed of snows and I figured it would be a good hunt. So I told the farmer whom I had never hunted on I wanted to give him a gift. He jumped in and said, "goose for a goose". Turns out he was referring to Blue Goose Vodka as his gift request. After our good hunt, I found a store with his goose, and tracked him down to give it to him. Added some BBQ and he was a happy camper. Said he was surprised. I said why, I said I would. He said lot's of guys say they will and none ever had. I said I may be back in future years and he said he would be glad to let us hunt anything he had. Lesson; give them something to remember you by and it will pay dividends down the road.
     
    JP likes this.
  2. Honker Ace

    Honker Ace Refuge Member

    Messages:
    53
    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2016
    Some sound advice here already, particularly from Geez. I would add on the ammo if chasing whitey, always better to be prepared with too much ammo you can use another day than not enough. I usually shoot efficiently and there was only one day this fall hunting in my home state I shot 6 for 6 on honkers, let alone 25 in 25 if you are on one of those snow hunts people dream about. Never ended up paying duty on ammo when we came across, I had two cases just myself. I wouldn't bank on that always being the case, though.

    Prices are definitely higher, but changing over in the States and carrying cash helps. Make sure if using a CC that it will work over there and not charge exorbitant fees. We had a little more in gas than most as it was our first time, but the amount of gas you use is obviously going to depend on just how much you want to scout. Once we figured roosts out, we chased them off there to the first feed and then fanned out from whichever direction we went looking for others. If you have to up and relocate, then expenses are going up - you may not have to, but when we were there people were pushing to where we were out of other areas simply due to a lack of birds where they traditionally based themselves (their words, not ours - but both of these groups were very well set-up for snows and we kept in touch while there and they had some good shoots so not rookies like us by any means to chasing snows.)

    Make sure to get the RM Maps for the area you will be staying in, those make life much easier when there both knowing who owns the land as well as being able to figure out where they live to knock on the door rather than call. Others have suggested phone books but the only time we called was if the landowner was not immediately in the area and we had no other way. I think out of the entire week or so we were there, there was only one field we had to call on and that was because they were out of town and the neighbors were nice enough to pass along a phone number.

    To keep hunting opportunities up, we ate as much of what we could while staying there - this also cut costs quite a bit. Still had to buy some sides and staples such as rice from the store while there but cutting protein costs saves a lot. Chili, shepherds pie, stroganoff, goose/duck over rice, the classic pulled goose/duck sandwiches, you name it...We ate it.

    Being from NoDak you already are used to the migration "stages" of bird species, so not as much to figure out other than it obviously is going to be earlier than what you are used to.

    Most important, just enjoy it...Being rookies and barely set-up for snows (we have plenty of experience and equipment for ducks and honkers) we knew the 100 bird shoots probably wouldn't happen, but just seeing the sheer amount of birds we did and getting the opportunities at rarities which are more common in the Prairies than home (such as pintails and snows) was great. At home, losing out on a huge field of birds could ruin your next morning while in Sask, it just meant instead of the snows you were going to focus on a smaller feed of snows or honkers/ducks that you found elsewhere.
     
    Lewx4 likes this.
  3. CNWD

    CNWD Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    868
    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2005
    Location:
    Canada
    It must be very different hunting in the USA.
    I am a resident of SK, and have hunted here all my life. The only thing I give a farmer is a very sincere thank you and a hand shake. Let him know that I respect his land. I won't rut it up or leave anything in the field that was not there before the hunt. I also share with him or her how much I appreciate being able to have access and without that I would not be able to make these memories that I cherish.

    We just do it differently and maybe the reason is because this is how I was brought up. Most of the farmers that I gain access to their land appreciate me stopping after the hunt to let them know how it went and that I picked up everything. Nothing more needs be given other than my full respect for the access.
     
  4. Geez n Quackers

    Geez n Quackers Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    797
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2000
    Location:
    Kansas City, MO
    Funny, because here at home I don't give the farmers gifts. It's pretty much as you say you do there. I wouldn't say that I am any more appreciative to hunt a farmers land up there than you are. But as a stranger privileged to hunt in someone else's country, I probably feel an even greater need to ensure that appreciation is expressed.
     
    Duck Wrangler likes this.
  5. waterfowlandy

    waterfowlandy New Member

    Messages:
    7
    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2017
    I've hunted southern Ontario for a while now, and it's extremely difficult to secure permission to hunt land unless you personally know them. Finding the birds isn't the issue, its getting permission once you've found them. I was just curious what its like getting permission in Saskatchewan, is it fairly easy over there?
     
  6. theduckguru

    theduckguru Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    2,647
    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2003
    Location:
    ohio
    You are leaving the areas that got 3” of rain while I am movin
    Do you speak some French? Things would get easier in Ontario.
     
  7. creedsduckman

    creedsduckman Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    1,549
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2005
    Location:
    Virginia
    When was that? I've stayed there and know guys that still do every year.
     
    ih2ofowler likes this.
  8. Chris Benson

    Chris Benson Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    6,335
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2002
    Location:
    Manitoba
    Depends on how good of a shot you are! ;)

    For myself when I hunt I normally bring 2 boxes per outing. 95% of the time I don't go anywhere near a full box to get a limit. but better to have too many then not enough. I hunt most large marshes so sometimes it takes a few shots to put down a cripple duck.
     
  9. DUCKIES1

    DUCKIES1 Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    182
    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2000
    Location:
    Bunker Hill IL.
    Answer to question 1) "Any advice you guys could add would be greatly appreciated". Take me with you.
    Answer to question 2) " I usual shoot B.B. for geese". I would shoot B's as the birds work in really close most of the time.
    Answer to question 3) As for shooting 3's on the ducks I agree.
    Back to question 1)
     
  10. mrmallerd

    mrmallerd Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    6,822
    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2002
    Location:
    southern illinois
    I've been going for 20+ years. I usually take a case of shells for 6 days & bring back 3 to 4 boxes. I take about 50/50 2s & 3s & end up wishing I had taken more 3s. We usually shoot darks for two days lights for two days & combination for two days.

    It has been my experience that farmers & land owners do not want to feel taken advantage of. At the least we stop by & say thanks. If they are in the field, a text works just as well. More times than not, they will tell us that we are more than welcome in the future.

    The places we stay have microwaves & fridges in the room. We usually take about 3/4 of our food & make a trip to the store as needed. Things we take have included, smoked pork loin, lasagna, enchiladas. Although there is information to be had at the local restaurants, we have found we like a little more R & R.
     

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