Goose reactions to windsocks

Discussion in 'Goose Hunting Forum' started by Cocklebur, Apr 24, 2017.

  1. CA Birdman

    CA Birdman Elite Refuge Member

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    Well in CA there is no ecaller allowed. The poster has posted this question on multiple sub forums and I mentioned hide in the first version, dig a hole, bury yourself and then worry about everything else.
     
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  2. KID CREOLE

    KID CREOLE Elite Refuge Member

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    Except juvie, here in California we cant use ecallers so your hide makes no difference if you cant call
     
  3. ArmChair Biologist

    ArmChair Biologist Senior Refuge Member

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    Yea but it's not quite as unrealistic as you might think. If there's a decent wind real birds almost always orientate into the wind. I always hate it when people put the tail end of full bodys into a good wind. I always walk through the spread and change that. I've read a few of your posts about specks and I don't know why they are so much harder to shoot in Louisiana. When I spent a month hunting in Arkansas the specks were crushing our snow sock spread every day all day. I've also talked to guys that guide speck hunts in Arkansas and they limit almost every day using mostly silhouettes.

    That's Canada though, it's a completely different game. If you talk to guides that follow the birds up from Arkansas/Missouiri all the way into Canada they will tell you that they get real dumb as soon as they cross the Canadian border and they're much easier to shoot. I don't know why that is but I've had multiple guys tell me the same thing. Perhaps it's a pressure thing.

    I agree. I never understood why guys would blast the callers then turn them down when birds got close. We run the callers pretty quite and let the decoys get their attention. I've done allot of research on snow mouth calls over the last year and the best call is either a Sean Mann White Out Express or a RedBone.

    I know we like to talk about what we can do to shoot more birds but I think what gets lost in this discussion is that allot of times, no matter what you do, you just have to be hunting on the right day. As long as your hidden and not screwing yourself over hunting on the right days is the best way to shoot birds. Whether it's snow geese or Canada geese I've noticed that the birds just want to decoy on certain days. I've hunted in area's with 4-6 snow spreads and 7-8 Canada spreads and on good days everyone shoots allot of birds. On tough days no one shoots birds. One field might get one good flock in and the other fields don't so that can be the difference between ten and 2 but normally good days are good for everyone and bad days are bad for everyone. Unless one field got a crazy amount of traffic and one field barely saw any birds this seems to hold more and more true every year I hunt. Especially now that I know more hunters across a geographic area that I can talk to.
     
  4. KID CREOLE

    KID CREOLE Elite Refuge Member

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    It could be a pressure thing in the states but I seriously doubt the birds just got dumb crossing a line on a map. These guys are very good hunters who know how to call snows and don't rely just on a ecaller.

    I have a theory about electronic calls that some might actually put off sounds that birds pick up like a warning sound, kind like a dog can hear certain high pitched noises that we cant. We have been in Canada with a ecaller out and the birds wont work, we swap out the ecaller and speakers and they start working, it could be a cheap or bad speaker/horn

    Most of us use different calls to create some diversity, but Red Bones and Performance Calls are some of our favorites. We need the loudest calls possible to traffic birds that are a field away or in wind. All of our calls have been tweeked a bit and are not used straight out of the box
     
  5. dukgtr187

    dukgtr187 Refuge Member

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    The sean mann wingnutz I use sounds pretty decent. its the first snow call ive bought other than that I've used a basin ricer speck call to bark at snows or and outlaw speck call to get snows seams to work. Im pretty sure kid creole uses another call that isn't made anymore.
     
  6. Rick Hall

    Rick Hall Elite Refuge Member

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    Re: wind, it takes quite a bit to make a feeding goose worry about it blowing up his skirt. Didn't know the quiz was coming when I filmed these last season, but you'll note there's enough breeze they're all landing into it, and if you bear with it until the minute mark, you'll see that the orientation of birds on the ground is largely unaffected by it:


    Re: the difference between Arkansas and SWLA, it is PRESSURE. Try hunting specks as you did in Arkansas in SWLA, and then tell us how that went for you. Many serious speck hunters here now travel to Arkansas, because their relatively tame birds make the trip and expense well worthwhile to them. Of course, as pressure increases on them there, the "promised land" may well continue to move north with the birds' expanding wintering territory...
     
    Last edited: May 3, 2017
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  7. KID CREOLE

    KID CREOLE Elite Refuge Member

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    Good video Rick! You can really hear the sound differences between the birds in the air vs. the birds on the ground

    We also have our FBs facing in all directions regardless of the wind, guess we need to work on our audio

    Our Calif spread, two of us in the blind, clear north wind



    Same spread two weeks later south wind

     
  8. 870

    870 Senior Refuge Member

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    Thanks Rick for the video,,,,

    Three things I noticed in the video,,,

    1) In the thinner wedge to the left where the birds are more spread out there was an up wind bias to their orientation.

    2) in the thicker right side where the flock was landing, the birds were definitely orientated in all directions, probably like get on the ground and get the heck out of the way of the incoming snows!!!

    3) Look at all the upright heads particularly in the landing zone.
     
  9. Rick Hall

    Rick Hall Elite Refuge Member

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    While I expect there's some greed bias toward the crowd, as well as what the wind (screwing up my audio) might create, I think you'll still find those left hand birds fairly random in orientation if you click on full screen and stop the video.

    Seems to me like about the only time I see them all headed in the same direction is when they're walking away from me.
     
  10. 870

    870 Senior Refuge Member

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    So who are "they"?,,, By the time the snows get back here, those birds are pushing 8 months of hunting pressure, are well fattened from months of prime dining on rice, corn and winter wheat and are more horny than hungry. All they really need is a quick bite, a drink and a nap,, and they are on their way north again. Now throw in wet fields with an abundance of sheetwater covering 10 -20% of the landscape meaning no need to fly between snack, drink and nap!!!

    That said, just like south of the 49th, as the migration winds down, the juvies and non breeders start coming through late as the fields start drying up (a lot less sheetwater) and the fall roosts start opening up congregating the birds. These birds are not on the same agenda as the breeders and you can start hunting like you would fall birds with better odds of success.

    One other thing,,, if they are "guiding" in Canada,,, they had better be hooked up with a resident outfitter,,, otherwise they would be considered illegal rogue outfitters. There are a few resident oufitters who do a bit of spring goose guiding, but they are few and far between compared to the guys who guide in the fall. Spring goose hunting up here is just too inconsistent from year to year to hang your hat on to build a stable business plan around.
     
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