have these been identified before

Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by GUNNERX2, Jun 20, 2017.

  1. GUNNERX2

    GUNNERX2 Elite Refuge Member

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    Went down to the lake today for the 1st time this year. Found some red root sedge but not much. Never did find any smart weed but did find these. I'm thinking water primrose and Johnson grass. 20170620_144747.jpg
     

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  2. Clayton

    Clayton Moderator Moderator

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    Yes on primrose but no on Johnsongrass in that type of habitat. Not close enough picture to ID grass. Could be rice cutgrass, barnyardgrass or red sprangletop. I lean towards rice cutgrass. Grab leaf lightly and gently pull your hand up leaf. If you get a papercut then rice cutgrass.
     
  3. GUNNERX2

    GUNNERX2 Elite Refuge Member

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    Didn't run my fingers up leaves but the stem was a little "grabby" in the up stroke but smooth when moving down the stem.
     
  4. Clayton

    Clayton Moderator Moderator

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    Sounds like it was cutgrass then. It does produce desirable seed for waterfowl but yield is low.
     
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  5. GUNNERX2

    GUNNERX2 Elite Refuge Member

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    I did a little reading on rice cutgrass and the source indicated that ducks will eat tubers as well.
     
  6. Greekangler

    Greekangler Senior Refuge Member

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    2% glyphosate will smoke that primrose. It's a nightmare
     
  7. JFG

    JFG Elite Refuge Member

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    Yes they will but what needs to be reiterated is that rice cut grass, along with many other moist soil plants, simply don't produce near enough seeds as a primary food source. If I'm able to "manage" my plot, I'm going to find out what's native to the area and work towards establishing plants such as barnyard grass, red root sedge, PA smartweed ... all annuals and heavy seed producers. Secondaries will always be interspersed throughout m-s lands and should be considered a supplement.
     

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