Hey Duckman

Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by Buttershot, Apr 23, 2002.

  1. Buttershot

    Buttershot Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    1,584
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2001
    Location:
    Spring, TX
    Help me out
    I've got a natural slew that is about 3 or 4 acres in size on 400 acres in Garwood, Tx.

    The slough is in a belt of hardwoods that runs maybe 2 miles wide on either side of the Colorado River. On either side of the woods is rice fields.

    The slough is shallow (maybe up to your waist) and sometimes dries up in the Summer. It is bordered with dense brush (Yopons and oaks). It floods out during big rain storms so it doesn't get too stagnant. It does contain vegitation but the pond appears to be used as a resting place not a forage area by the birds.

    Since we are so close to the prairie, we get predominatly teal, Widgeon, Mallards, Gadwall and Pintail.

    When the pressure on the prairie gets tough, the birds hit da slough.

    The slough usually floods in the fall and the Duckin is fantastic.

    This place has never been planted and unfortunatly the owners don't give a rats *** bout habitat. I'm gonna plant this bugger.

    In your opinion, what is the best bird food to plant in this particular situation? Sorry I don't have pics. Let me know if I can give you more info.
     
  2. MSDuckmen

    MSDuckmen Moderator Moderator

    Messages:
    3,660
    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2001
    Location:
    Brandon, Mississippi
    Buttershot

    being in texas you have the climate to plant millet, milo, and sunflowers.

    I have a stand of flooded woods that this has worked well in.

    I have gone to walmart and bought 500lbs of wild bird seed in the 50 lb bags. This has a mixture that works for all our feathered friends. The Sunflowers do not work well in trees but any open area in the trees you'll have some.

    You need nothing more than a yard rack and a seed spreader to make this happen. Plant around the edges where the water will only get to no more than two feet deep. Of course you have to plant when it is dry and will remain dry for 2 to three months.

    You really don't want to plant where you are planning on hunting. plant where the birds can come in and rest and eat and you'll have birds all the time.

    I plant above and below the areas I hunt thus it gives the birds a chance to see my spread or pass me up for a meal. If they pass me up today tomorrow I'll get another chance at them.

    The concept is to have a place that the birds can come and feed without pressure. the more birds you can get to do that the more you will have come through your area.

    This does not mean that you should never hunt where you plant but inyour case that is what I would do.
    Food or not you will not have birds long if you pound them where they eat.
     
  3. Buttershot

    Buttershot Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
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    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2001
    Location:
    Spring, TX
    Makes alot of sense, There are two other fish ponds on the property. Since The area we primarily hunt is small, it'll be hard to let em rest but Because of the deer hunters during the early season, the place only gets hunted once or twice a week. I think what I'm gonna do is plant all the ponds. Thanks for the info bud.
     

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