How Critical is 49 Days(Puppy)

Discussion in 'Gun Dog Forum' started by mdnduck, Jun 8, 2014.

  1. mdnduck

    mdnduck Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    864
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2002
    I am getting a puppy and I thought next week at 49 days and when I send a text it comes back that husband is out of town(I think he works in LA and she is in Nor Cal) and one person is in front of me. Its implying that I will not get my dog at 49 days. My question is how many weeks old is acceptable before you pick up a puppy and at how many weeks do you move on and ask for you deposit back(this is a small kennel). I plan on calling her and get an actual date, but looking for some information first.

    Thanks in advance

    MDNDUCK
     
  2. Doc E

    Doc E Elite Refuge Member Sponsor

    Messages:
    21,148
    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2000
    Location:
    Colville WA USA
    49 days is nice, but not critical.
    I think anywhere from 46 days to 58 days is a nice window.

    .
     
  3. duckdon

    duckdon Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    521
    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2009
    Location:
    Alaska
    It's not
    I would prefer a pup at more like 10 weeks any time.
    Don
     
  4. montana bound

    montana bound Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    864
    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2009
    Location:
    Nashua, MT
    We dont let them go before 8 weeks here.
    Puppies are healther at that point .
    As for training and bonding I've found there is no difference whether it be 7 weeks or 16 weeks. That puppy will be the same.
     
  5. ABREOJOS

    ABREOJOS Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    1,025
    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2002
    Location:
    Ronan, MT
    The 49 day myth was started by Richard Wolters, citing an extensive study of seeing eye dogs. The study did not give an ideal date but did say that human interaction was critical between 7 & 12 weeks or the dog would not bond to humans. I would not want a pup that was still with its littermates after 12 weeks

    We like to get our dogs between 7 & 8 weeks old. Training starts immediately. During the first he comes home, the pup learns to sleep in a crate, is conditioned to do his business outside, learn that his butt has to touch the floor on the sit command before getting a meal, chases a toy down the hall and gets used to wearing a collar and leash. By 16 weeks or so our pup should be sitting, walking on lead with little restraint (in a controlled environment), doing 75 yard marks on a flat dirt lot, doing very simple doubles and doing basic three handed casting.

    During this period, we are exposing him to lots of new situations including training sessions, traffic, new people, birds, etc. It is all fun for the pup with no real pressure. I enjoy this period. The puppies are little sponges that learn so quickly.

    We pick up our next pup in July. I am really looking forward to it. It has been over 4 years since we started our last one.
     
  6. FieldLabLover

    FieldLabLover Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    3,381
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2004
    Location:
    Midwest
    I can't understand why people are in such a panic over the 49 day thing. You are looking at a time where dogs were raised in pens and not handled much or socialized so you needed them to get out of there. Many states mandate a minimum of 8 weeks or older to be sold and all airlines mandate 8 weeks minimum to be flown. Having raised many puppies, I can say that around 8 weeks they actually take the transition a little better than 7 weeks. If they are being worked and socialized there is no problem longer. If they are in a litter, they need to be separated no later than 9 weeks. I'm getting a new puppy flown in tomorrow at 8 weeks. Relax, it needs to be let go to have to get them the exact day or panicking. In fact, it says to me that person will be rigid or anal or less educated and I won't even take a deposit if that question is asked. Puppy training is not about being rigid.
     
  7. BobGlover

    BobGlover Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    844
    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2003
    Location:
    Arkansas
    You're right, the '49 day' thing is an old wives tale, but why do they need to be separated no later than 9 wks? The main thing is that the pup needs to be socialized, either by the breeder or the owner, early and often. That will eliminate a lot of problems down the road. Ed Bailey has a good article on the '49 week thing' at www.gundogmag.com.
     
  8. quack0905

    quack0905 Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    4,084
    Joined:
    May 12, 2001
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest
    I picked up one of the best dogs I've ever owned when she was 12 weeks old - all the other puppies were gone, and the breeder was training it for his own use but decided to sell it. 49 days is not critical ... but it does give you more time to develop things when the pup's mind isn't cluttered with much beyond eating, pooping, and establishing pecking order (or having it established for them) ...
     
  9. Sasha and Abby

    Sasha and Abby Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    4,672
    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2002
    Location:
    Columbia, SC.
    It matters not a bit. I have broken all the "rules" for the last 30 years on what you are supposed to do with puppies, and mine have all turned out to be fantastic retrievers, that are waaaay beyond my ability.

    I keep one female out of the only litter she will have at 4-5 years of age. It is raised in the house with the mother and not separated.
     
  10. FieldLabLover

    FieldLabLover Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    3,381
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2004
    Location:
    Midwest
    Field litters are notorious for turning into little jerks at 9 weeks if not just slightly before. The bullies get worse and those that are reserved start to hide. Also, you can't always judge a reserved puppy as shy until you get him out of the dynamics of the litter and his little personality comes out.

    And that's fine. I am totally up front about it and those people can go find someone else to cater to their 49 day needs, because there are a bunch out there that will do anything to make a sale. When pick #1 is coming from 12 hours away and he can only come on the weekend and the pup is 49 days on Tuesday, how would you feel if you had first pick and someone else demanded their puppy before you could make it? I have no patience for demanding buyers. State law here is they may not leave sooner than 7 weeks and they do check your records. The pups go when I say they are ready to go. Larger litters or sometimes c-section pups and small pups need a longer time before they are ready to go to their new homes. Wolters wrote a book and marketed it well but he was not much of a trainer. He was about timelines, and people either stress over where their dog is in the sequence or push the puppy. Many of them even start to turn off pups and their natural retrieving desire by old school methods and ego. Puppies should learn at their own pace and have fun starting out. Hillman recognized the need for a method that had a sequence based on the puppies' own pace and maturity. It's all about the time you put into the pup and the patience you have training with them, not a day you have to get them. It makes no sense in this day and age with how well good breeders are socializing them.
     

Share This Page