How Do DU Wetlands Stack Up?

Discussion in 'Habitat Forum' started by silvermallard, May 1, 2002.

  1. silvermallard

    silvermallard Elite Refuge Member

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  2. Marshmaster

    Marshmaster Elite Refuge Member

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    Some very important points not mentioned in those statements were:

    If they were not wet for the same number of years, they could be at different biological points during the wet/dry cycles which would perhaps influence food production.

    If the water levels were not similar during the time of the study period, the difference could limit food production(plant growth) because of light penetration issues.

    Were or weren't there fish populations in the paired wetlands. We know that fathead minnows devour macro-invertebrates, those little creatures that are needed by hens for egg laying and later needed by the ducklings to fuel their growth. This has been proven by Mark Hanson of the MN DNR in studies he's conducted.

    I've seen wetlands next to each other have one wetland be fresh water while the one just a few yards away have salt deposits on the plant stalks at water level and be alkaline as all get out. This would mean that there are different plant communities in each wetland and that could limit bird use on one of them.

    Were the drained watersheds for each wetland the same? This would have an effect on how much water is coming into it and affecting water levels.

    Marshmaster
     
  3. silvermallard

    silvermallard Elite Refuge Member

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    Because they were not mentioned, are we to assume they were not taken into account? We could "what if" this stuff to death. I tend to think that the reputation of a wetland biologist working on such a high-profile study would motivate him/her to no small extent to be as thorough as possible. On the flip-side, DU was paying the bills for this independent study, and political pressure to reach the desired conclusions could also be a mitigating factor. I'm sure that if someone really wanted to know in that detail, they could request the research notes, question the biologist, etc. about these factors you bring up. Good questions, MM. For me, I'm relatively satisfied...although always curious...with the findings of the study: that DU wetland reclamation projects are as beneficial to wildlife as similar natural wetlands are.
     
  4. Marshmaster

    Marshmaster Elite Refuge Member

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    Silver,

    I was having a little bit of fun with it since you know what would have happened if you had posted a spinner study.

    Marshmaster
     

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