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How do you estimate range??

Discussion in 'Snow Goose Hunting Forum' started by a-carpenter, Jan 6, 2004.

  1. a-carpenter

    a-carpenter Senior Refuge Member

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    Location:
    Illinois
    How do you estimate range??

    I do mark out range indicators, an odd decoy, stick or small pile of brush at 40 yards from my shooting spot. This works well when a goose comes in 20' of the ground.
    But what do you do when they are straight up. To complicate things more all geese are not the same size and a 7 lb goose at 45 yards may look like a 4 lb goose at say 35 yards. Also won't a snow goose will appear to be larger or closer than a blue at the same range because of the light color VS dark color thing.
    I have been in the field when the guide had a range finder, after passing on a shot you will get different range estimates from every hunter, some high some low, a person that guesses high one time might guess low the next.
    Some will say, "don't shoot unless you can see the feet” but it seems I can see the feet over 50 yards away if I look for them.

    P.S. Is it just me or does a goose appear closer the longer you watch it show off its flying skills just out of range.
     
  2. kansasgoose

    kansasgoose Senior Refuge Member

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    Hoyt, Kansas
    the best thing i have found to estimate range, other than just a lot of experience, is to focus in on the bill of the goose. when you can clearlly see the color and the shape of the goose's bill, its in range. Snow geese dont very in size all that much, nothing like canada geese. Most snows are 4-5 lbs, not 3-15 lbs like them darks can be. Therefore, another way to go is to kill one, have someone walk out 40 yards and hold it up with the wings cupped, and then really study it, and see what you can see. then have them move back to 50 yards and up to 30 yards. While there doing this, unload you shot gun, and you can "practice" aiming at it, and see how much of your gun barrel covers the bird at the different yardages. I dont think looking at a blue vs a snow makes any difference, for they are all the same size and either technique will work.

    If you wait until you can tell what color the bill is, you should never be shooting too far.
     
  3. Coastal Ducks

    Coastal Ducks Elite Refuge Member

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    Practice, it just takes a lot of practice.

    While snows and blues are close in size the ross geese will fool you, they are pretty dang small and the population of Ross geese is growing. You have to take that into consideration. I love those dumb little buggars.
     
  4. Finlander

    Finlander Senior Refuge Member

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    Location:
    Gooseville, Mn
    Trace out a snow goose on paper or cardboard all wings out stretched and head as if it were flying above you.
    Trace this onto plywood and paint it the same colors as the snow.
    Attatch this to a stick that you can place in the ground and pace off different yards like 30, 40, 50, 60, 70 etc.
    Take your gun and look down the barrel at the fake flying snow goose and compare what you see.
    Note the size of the goose for each distance.
    The size of your barrel against the goose is what will determine the leathal distance to shoot.
    Otherwise buy a lazer range finder and have someone tell you when they are in range.
    With a little practice with these suggestions it'll be easy to determine when there in range.
    ;)
     
  5. a-carpenter

    a-carpenter Senior Refuge Member

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    Location:
    Illinois
    Thanks for the advice.

    The reason for my post is bacause it seems that my eyes tend to play some tricks on me when I lay on my back , stare at the sky and watch snows work the spread for 5 min or so. I've been hunting for 20 years and this is the only time I have trouble guessing range , in a blind or pit I have no problems.

    I found that with Canadas I can look for the spaces between the wing feathers , at 35 or 40 yards the space can be seen but at 50 yrds I can't see the space, don't know if this would work on snows but it should.
    I think every ross gets shot at 5-10 yards , wow do they sneek up fast.

    P.S. I need a bigger house cause I can one get about 30 ft away from the mounted snow I have on the wall in the next room ;-}.
     
  6. maddogg

    maddogg Senior Refuge Member

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    usually if I can see there feet ,thats a good judgement for me.Its worked so far.
     
  7. ColoDuk

    ColoDuk Elite Refuge Member

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    it just comes to you after a while, once you get used to shooting birds you just know if a bird is in range or not, you do get fooled everyonce in a while, like huge canadas are farther than they seem, the little canadas and especially the ross's are usually closer than they seem
     
  8. Gander D. Bander

    Gander D. Bander Elite Refuge Member

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    I shoot at um.. if they fall they were within range;) :sp :nutz
     
  9. jaysdux1

    jaysdux1 Elite Refuge Member

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    lost on lake erie, ohio
    :l:l Good Philosophy! ;)
     

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