How much should we "bend" to interest kids in the outdoors?

Discussion in 'The Duck Hunters Forum' started by seiowa, Oct 30, 2017.

  1. CookMan

    CookMan Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    Joined:
    May 29, 2015
    Location:
    AL
    Yes I agree. They have plenty of time for the phones and computers when not in the outdoors.
     
  2. bill cooksey

    bill cooksey Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    8,489
    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2000
    Location:
    Bartlett, Tn., USA
    While those efforts are wonderful, they only impact a small number of kids, and many of those kids are already hunting. They find out about the events through game and fish, scholastic shooting and other venues only sportsmen really know about. Also, they are a day or two per year. That doesn't do much to compete with other activities.

    The casual "couple of days a year" guy, which is who we have lost in most areas, no longer has much access to decent hunting. Here, small game was once king, and it wasn't difficult to get permission to hunt. Now, it's all leased for deer. If a parent, relative or trusted mentor isn't really damned serious about hunting, and taking that kid, they simply don't get to go.

    My oldest son was always crazy about hunting, and he was never ready to quit. My youngest went a lot when he was really young, and I let him play with whatever gizmo he wanted. He then got ambivalent about it for a few years before he was able to shoot. We don't have a set age here, and it's left to the parent to determine when the kid is ready. He's now 17. He couldn't care less about deer hunting, and I couldn't bribe him into a stand, but he is always ready for turkey, dove and duck. Due to the nature of the sports, or the way I hunt, the phone is never out for dove or turkey, except for photos, and while duck hunting he uses it about like the average 40+ man in the blind.

    I honestly believe it's all about giving them every opportunity to be out there. Each kid is an individual. Some will love it, and some will leave it no matter what the parent does. But, none will love it without sufficient opportunities.
     
  3. hobbydog

    hobbydog Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    5,178
    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2002
    Location:
    Minnesota
    I think it still comes down to genetics. I would say most on here are driven to hunt. It is an internal drive that is the same as what make labs retrieve. They will hunt alone, in nasty weather, stay when it is poor hunting and spend ridiculous amounts of money on it. They will find hunting whether you introduce them to it or not. Then there are those that will go if they have someone to go with but enjoy the social part more than the hunt. And of course there are those that even after being introduced to good hunting have little drive for it. I see it evolving into a lot less hunters but those that remain will be way more passionate about it. They will push out those less pationate as they compete for quality resources. So... I say introduce them to it and if they have the passion it will come through whether there’s have gadgets along or not.

    It is good to see lots of young women joining the ranks.
     
  4. bill cooksey

    bill cooksey Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    8,489
    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2000
    Location:
    Bartlett, Tn., USA
    I couldn't disagree more. My oldest was as passionate about it as anyone I have ever known. My youngest enjoys certain types of hunting, but I have my doubts as to whether or not he'll pursue it once I'm gone. Once he goes to college, I doubt he'll hunt other than when he visits home. Only way they could be more different is if my youngest simply hated it.

    Further, I learned quite a bit while working at Avery. We used to bring some of the Chinese we were working with to the US to hunt each year. Aside from relationship building, we wanted them to better understand how products were actually used. None of those men had ever hunted before, and most had never seen a wild animal. Some absolutely fell in love with it, and others simply went through the motions because of the business relationship.
     
    The_Duck_Master likes this.
  5. ArmChair Biologist

    ArmChair Biologist Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    170
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2016
    Location:
    MN
    Why do you need to bring kids? How about bringing an adult who shows interest but never had the means?

    I'm all for bringing kids but there's many other people you can bring into the sport. I got my cousin into hunting when he was in his early twenties because he had an interest in it. He now has a duck boat, his own decoys, and goes on his own. My buddy and I got his brother in law into duck hunting when he was an adult and the same thing. I also got my neighbor into it, and although he doesn't go every year because I don't live next to him anymore he still likes it and will go again. I got my girlfriend into hunting as well. All were adults who wouldn't have gone if they didn't have someone to bring them.

    Bring kids. They'll either be into it or they wont. However, there's a large segment of the adult population that is interested in giving hunting a shot but don't know anyone that does it. Especially now that people are really into knowing where their food comes from. I've met allot of people in large cities that want to shoot their own meat but don't know anyone that hunts. When they find out I hunt they are very interested in it.

    How about getting minorities into hunting? In Minnesota we have a large Hmong population that hunts. If it wasn't for them our license sales would really be in the tank.
     
    Shirleyshusband likes this.
  6. seiowa

    seiowa Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    1,006
    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2015
    Location:
    Iowa
    They might buy licenses or they might not, how come I'm always reading news stories about them shooting 9437 squirrels and keeping 7362 8" walleyes and white bass?
     
  7. ArmChair Biologist

    ArmChair Biologist Senior Refuge Member

    Messages:
    170
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2016
    Location:
    MN
    They don't poach any more then white guys. People get all up in arms when they see a Hmong family keeping 5 inch sunfish, but that's actually better for the resource then the white guy keeping his limit of 9 inch sunfish.

    Go to a bar in outstate MN and wait until guys start getting drunk and you'll find out how rampant poaching is. I've talked to many Hmong anglers and hunters and it's no different. The ones that grew up here are constantly arguing with their fathers/grandfathers about catch and release because the old guys want to keep everything and the younger guys have a catch and release ethic. It sounds like the thousand arguments I've had with my own grandpa.
     
    hobbydog likes this.
  8. seiowa

    seiowa Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    1,006
    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2015
    Location:
    Iowa
    Also @ArmChair Biologist i didn't quote the rest but i agree on adults. A buddy of mine is now a great friend to the local retail economy, and constantly in the doghouse with the lady after I introduced him to duck hunting. This guy has the "fire". Hes a horrible shot and I think last year he maybe killed all of 4 birds but hes more fired up about it than I am and spends twice the money annualy.
     
    ArmChair Biologist likes this.
  9. seiowa

    seiowa Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    1,006
    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2015
    Location:
    Iowa
    I personally dont have anything against them, I see a lot of them trout fishing in the driftless. Lots of them love to shoot squirrels. Never with my own eyes seen any of them over harvest and for some being kinda limited in English, they seem friendly enough. Ive always heard it explained that game bag limits and length limits are a cultural thing that some of the first generation immigrant Hmong don't really grasp.
     
  10. TheDuckSlayer

    TheDuckSlayer Elite Refuge Member

    Messages:
    8,739
    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2002
    Location:
    Mobile Delta
    Yea, Vietnamese don't follow size and limit regs. But they make use of every thing they keep, right down to boiling fish heads for soup. I have a lot more respect for that than some white dude that poaches a trophy deer just to cut the head off and let the rest rot.
     

Share This Page