How to tenderize elk steaks

Discussion in 'Big Game Hunting Forum' started by J.SCOTT, Mar 16, 2014.

  1. Alamosa

    Alamosa Elite Refuge Member

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    On big bulls I'll usually do a larger ratio of burger and sausage than say for instance a 2-3 yr old cow. You can get tenderizing machines if you have a enough of it to make it worth it. Marinades help but have limited effectiveness. Jerky and additional grinding are always an option.
     
  2. Rubberhead

    Rubberhead Elite Refuge Member

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    ^ THIS ^

    I've never shot an elk but I cook a lot of wild game including whitetail. I cooked some venison steaks today and they were very tendor. There's a few tricks to not over cooking.

    1) Start with meat that is room temperature (70-80 degrees) all the way through. Keep them packaged and out of the air when you do this and you won't have a problem with bacteria. If they're frozen and packaged in a waterproofed wrapping, you can float them in warm water. Change the water after the steaks thaw. Otherwise leave them out on the counter but well covered.

    2) Cook them hot and fast (starting with them room temperature in the middle is key to this). For a 3/4" venison steak, I cook them for 5 minutes on the grill on high (400-500 degrees over the flame). Then turn them and cook for another 5 minutes on low (around 300 degrees).

    3) Let 'em rest for 10 minutes after cooking. Cooking like above usually leaves a warm pink center. Letting the meat rest helps them finish cooking and will keep the juices in once they're served and cut.

    I like to serve wild game with horseradish mashed potatoes and a steamed vegetable. The mash potatoes should made hot enough with horseradish that they are used more to dip/flavor the meat rather than eat en masse.
     
  3. geese4u

    geese4u Elite Refuge Member

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    If you had your elk butchered by a commercial shop, chances are that they cut it with a saw, and there is still a fair amount of connective tissue (gristle) running through the cuts (steaks) you received. When we cut deer or elk, we try and separate out individual muscle groups, and only cut steaks from these. This way, everything looks/cuts like the backstrap, and even older "tougher" animals are tender.
     
  4. sago

    sago New Member

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  5. SteveH

    SteveH Senior Refuge Member

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  6. dakndug

    dakndug Moderator Moderator

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    Find someone that actually knows how to cook wild game cause done right elk ain't tough.
     
  7. iawaterfowler

    iawaterfowler Elite Refuge Member

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    The acid in a citrus flavored soda will tenderize about anything.
     
  8. dakndug

    dakndug Moderator Moderator

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    Ok so last night I pulled out my very last elk steak I had in the freezer.

    I thawed it then put just a dash of spicy bourbon rub on it, and grilled it
    to medium rare and it is MELT IN YOUR MOUTH! OMG it was so good I bout
    cried knowing it was the last one. Guess I've gotta go elk hunting next fall!

    Doug
     

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