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Hunter and Caller Placement Tips

Discussion in 'Snow Goose Hunting Forum' started by Juvie Juke Box, Feb 12, 2017.

  1. Juvie Juke Box

    Juvie Juke Box Senior Refuge Member Sponsor

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    E-Caller Placement Tips

    I have had a lot of questions regarding why we only include 3 feet of speaker wire with our units. I will cover that in this post as well as give some caller placement tips depending on what type of situation you are hunting and in regards to the wind.

    Below is the explanation of why 3 feet is included with the unit,

    1. We run multiple callers so we have no need to have long lengths of
    speaker wire. This allows you to face speakers at other speakers
    creating a "sound cloud" and prevent any dead areas within the spread.


    2. The more speaker wire you run, the further that the amp has to push
    the sound. The further away it gets the more sound quality you lose.
    Similar to Voltage drop from a Electrical Standpoint. However, those that
    do want to add more wire can do so via extension cords. We don't
    recommend going over 25 feet. The first ecaller we ever built back in the
    day had 8 speakers coming out of one unit. 2 were 25 foot, 2 were 50
    feet, 2 were 75, and 2 were 100 feet. The 25 foot still sounded alright
    but as the distance increased the sound got more distorted.


    E-Caller Placement
    There are multiple ways to set your E-Caller or Callers depending on what type of hunting you will be doing. Below is a few examples with diagrams. This diagram write up comes standard with every order.

    No wind to 5mph

    In this situation hunting snows is already tough, wind gives the birds direction and forces them to approach your spread into the wind. When there is little to no wind present the birds can work the spread whichever way they like. Using sound to direct them as well as motion will help ensure that the birds center up on the shooters as well as possible. Typically, on a no to low wind day we will sit in the middle of the spread or on the “upwind” side. When there is no wind and you are sitting in the middle having multiple holes/pockets for the birds to key in on as they begin to work is the first step. Next motion and sound. Whether you are using rotary’s, electric flyers, or old fashioned flags you want to have the motion steal the bird’s attention from your hide. On these type of wind days we like to run most of our rotary’s 10-15 yards in front of our hide. This will make the birds focus is on the movement instead of looking at your hide. A lot of guys like to place their rotary’s behind them in situations like this and although plenty of birds have been shot doing this the birds are scanning over you before their eyes reach the motion behind you. When placing your callers in this situation a few things should be taken into consideration. First and foremost is how many E-Callers you plan on running. If only 1 or 2 we suggest having one 10-15 yards out mixed into the rotary’s or whichever motion system you are using. Not only will the birds be focused in on the motion but now they will also be focused in on your sound. The 2nd caller being placed in the middle of the kill hole or a few yards up wind of your hide will utilize your sound effectively. Remember that the loudest sound is more than likely where you are going to shoot your bids so having the 2nd caller on a lower volume will help with that if it is upwind of your hide. If you are running 3+ callers having a unit in the kill hole, a unit by your motion, and the remaining units mixed throughout your entire spread at a lower volume will make your spread have 360 degrees of sound coverage.

    diagram1.jpg

    10-15mph wind

    10 to 15 mph wind is the perfect recipe for a good snow goose shoot especially if there is plenty of sun or some nasty weather. Killing migrators is ideal with these wind speeds. When there is 10-15mph we almost always sit in the middle of the spread, half of our decoys are down wind and the other half up wind. Just like above you want to utilize a kill hole or multiple kill holes in front of the shooters to get the birds to focus in on an area. Another approach is just running a blob which makes the geese typically want to get to the very top of the spread. In a 10-15 mph wind using rotary’s is kind of a toss up, 15 mph is typically the max wind we will use a rotary in then we will just use long flags or flyers to add the needed motion we want to achieve. We use a little bit different of approach with the loudest callers during wind like this. Instead of having one 10-15 yards down wind we normally will have one 4-5 yards in front and 4-5 yards behind the shooters, with 1 more on either side of the shooters 4-5 yards away. This creates a nice sound diamond. Since birds are going to get out faster when being shot at you want them as close as possible when calling the shot, unlike in the low wind situation when you need to give them tons of direction the wind will give the birds the majority of the direction they need. Your sound and any motion you have will be second. For the majority of the other callers like in any other situation we place all our remaining callers scattered throughout the spread on a lower volume.

    diagram2.jpg


    15+ mph wind

    15+ mph wind can either be phenomenal or extremely frustrating. When the wind starts picking up into that 20-25+ range multiple issues come into play. First and foremost being your decoys, if you are running silo socks we recommend placing them at an angle into the ground with the tails touching the dirt to prevent them from doing the infamous “death thrash” which will flare birds. If running a Skyfly, Deadly, Whiterock or any similar type decoy more than likely large amounts of wind will not create many issues. If running a full body on a ring base, we hope you have field stakes. Having motion in this wind speed primarily will come from your decoys and any kind of long flags you have. Rotary’s are not recommended and neither are flyers in our opinion as they begin to look “goofy” in a hard heavy wind, especially if there are any gusts. We always sit on the down wind side of the spread in these wind conditions. We will only have 5-10 yards of decoys in front of us. There are multiple reasons we do this. First and foremost being the geese are going to take a long time to get to your spread and once they do if your sitting in the middle or top side of the spread they may give up and land downwind, flare from being able to study your entire spread for minutes before reaching the top, or start to lift as they get to the top. When sitting at the bottom you will have birds coming over you well within range. Some people don’t think this is decoying birds as they aren’t dumping into a kill hole but we will take these shots all day long. As far as your sound goes, it is going to carry A LOT. More so than you think so having all your callers turned down more than usual is going to be your best bet right off the bat. If you don’t think there loud enough you can always turn them up. You still want the loudest units to be by the shooters. One other tactic that is effective is sitting down wind of your spread entirely either in a small pod of snow decoys, honker decoys or just hidden with no decoys. A lot of time birds will crawl across the ground on their approach to your spread, lifting as they get closer and closer. If you are down wind these will give you tons of shot opportunity’s. More of a pass shoot, but still an absolute blast.

    diagram3.jpg


    Hunting Over Water


    There is nothing cooler than watching a big flock of snows vertically descend into your spread, especially when over water. Water can offer a unique hunt and setup that the birds are not typically seeing as much as they do with typical field sets. Finding the perfect waterhole can be a challenge but there are a few we recommend the most. First and foremost being water/feed. This will have a pond or a large chunk of sheet water situated in the middle or edge of a field with the food source running right up to or close enough to the water so that decoys can be placed on both. This will be the most effective water setup as you will appeal to birds not only looking to rest/loaf but those looking to feed as well. As the day progresses the geese will be more prone to hit one part of the spread or another. The 2nd choice would be a pasture pond. Pasture ponds are used by snow geese up and down the flyway for them to rest and get water before picking back up and migrating. Typically the most action packed parts of the day hunting a pasture pond will be from 10-2 but we have shot birds all day over a pasture spread. Although we are just now running 20-30 dozen floaters this year, we have in the past utilized full bodies or socks on long stakes to get the desired look we wanted in the water. Remember not to pack your floaters or decoys on shore too tight. You want to look as big as possible when targeting birds migrating. When it comes to sound, the closer you are to the water the quitter you want your callers to be. The sound will bounce off the water and if your units are too loud it will be a for sure way to flare some birds you may have shot otherwise. As a general rule when hunting a loaf situation you should put your callers on their normal volume then drop them at least a few volume points.


    Stay Tuned for more tips from us at Juvie Juke Box! Get the extra edge you need for the geese and spreads you are competing with this spring by running our Custom Track!


    Thanks for your business!
     
  2. Empty Skies

    Empty Skies Elite Refuge Member

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    Thanks!!
     
  3. bullpinnie

    bullpinnie Elite Refuge Member

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    good info!
     
  4. 81arnghunter

    81arnghunter Refuge Member

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    Is there any way to make Snows work a certain direction? By that I mean I wanting them to turn over the water behind my pit, but instead they tend to turn away from it, it is more open the way they are working but it generally forces them to come in cross wind.
     
  5. Cliner

    Cliner Senior Refuge Member

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    Good stuff JJB, thanks for the info.
     
  6. Scotty

    Scotty Elite Refuge Member

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    Definitely a cool thread-
    This also illustrates to me the difference in hunting lessers vs greaters- on windy days you definitely want to be at the top of the rig, and a little further down on less windy days.
     
  7. Juvie Juke Box

    Juvie Juke Box Senior Refuge Member Sponsor

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    You may be able to set your spread in a way that would get them to work the way you want, but generally speaking they will take the easiest path which sounds like is what they are doing right now?

    No kidding? I know there are people who hunt the upwind side of the spread regardless of wind but we have had a ton of missed shot opportunitys sitting at the top when it is really windy. I see a lot of youtube videos where if people where in the middle or downwind side they would of increased the end result by quite a few birds.
     
  8. Scotty

    Scotty Elite Refuge Member

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    Where are you located?
     
  9. Juvie Juke Box

    Juvie Juke Box Senior Refuge Member Sponsor

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    Our company is based out of South Dakota.
     
  10. Bonce

    Bonce Refuge Member

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    Scott, I was wondering about that myself. whenever I've hunted with you and derek we were always up top. But the other day I went, 35+ winds, and rain/snow I noticed after the fact, that if I'd been down at the bottom of my spread I would've had much closer, better shots. could also be due to the size of my spread too.
     

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