Hunting may be the Answer to Americas Crime Problem

Discussion in 'Hunters Rights Forum' started by WhiteRiverWill, Sep 17, 2007.

  1. WhiteRiverWill

    WhiteRiverWill Senior Refuge Member

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    I have never seen the statistics but I wonder how many crimes are committed by people who are licensed hunters. I'll bet the percentage would be quite low in comparison with the rest of the country. A person who hunts learns a respect for guns and life that others can not comprehend. Therefore I submit, the best way to reduce crime would be to introduce more young people to the outdoors and gun safety classes.
     
  2. Tech III

    Tech III Elite Refuge Member

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    Add to that CHL holders.
     
  3. The Other David

    The Other David Elite Refuge Member

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    Good question, tough one to answer.

    It is known that children who are introduced to shooting by parents/relatives are less likely to be involved in gun crime.

    But...

    People who hunt are different in important ways than people who commit crime. It is likely that the factors that lead them to hunt, and to have the resources to be able to hunt, and who had the early exposure to guns, hunting, and the outdoors, are also the factors that prevent them from becoming criminals.

    For example, close contact and good relationship with father or other close male relative, finances good enough to allow for getting out of doors, family history of doing out of doors activities, etc.

    After Hillary is elected we can get a multi-million dollar grant to study it!:tu

    David
     
  4. The Other David

    The Other David Elite Refuge Member

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    Sort of the same issue. Those who are law abiding enough to seek out and be qualified to get a CHL already have a life history of being non-criminals.
     
  5. WhiteRiverWill

    WhiteRiverWill Senior Refuge Member

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    David, We have studied things in this country until we are all suffering from the paralysis of analysis. We must start somewhere and getting more kids and compent adults together into the woods, fields, and streams seems like a good place to start.
     
  6. The Other David

    The Other David Elite Refuge Member

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    I'm game!:tu
     
  7. woodiefever

    woodiefever Senior Refuge Member

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    How do you expect to get those woods creeks and streams into the inner city... or vice versa people from the inner city out to them. The inner city population lives a different life, than compared to the ( IMO ) lifestyle Majority of outdoor enthusiasts. Not saying that they arent good people just that there are two different dynamics of people here and that priorities, likes and dislikes arent the same.
     
  8. WhiteRiverWill

    WhiteRiverWill Senior Refuge Member

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    Woodie, we may not get the inner city kids out there but what about the ones out in the suburbs and outlying areas. So many of them have their nose stuck in a computer or their ear in a cell phone or an ipod and have never been introduced to the outdoors.
     
  9. ninethreeeleven

    ninethreeeleven Senior Refuge Member

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    There is a direct correlatoin between crime and poverty, being that much of the rural areas of this country are poverty sticken* and that most of the hunting in this country takes place in rural areas I suspect that percentage wise the theory may not hold if studied.

    I say this because the theory includes one major part "who are licensed hunters." That "are" is very meaningful because it means that these people have taken a gun safety/hunter safety course and have permission to carry firearms*. That rules out many people who are hunters: poachers and the unlicensed hunter. It also rules out people who can't take the course because they are already criminals.

    For arguments sake I can say that I know one person who was a hunter but is no longer because she can't carry a gun because she is a convicted felon. Other than her I know at least 40 hunters who are not criminals, and many of whom are actually in law enforcement.


    *1: Per capita, not geographical area.
    *2: In NY you can't carry a firearm if you're a convicted felon.
     
  10. WhiteRiverWill

    WhiteRiverWill Senior Refuge Member

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    I do not accept the premise that poverty = crime. During the Great Depression there was a drop in the crime rate. Poverty may well be an excuse for some but I believe in the old saying "Whats in the well comes up in the bucket."
    I live in a rural area. I am not rich by any stretch but I have never concidered comitting a crime. My father taught me at an early age the beauty of the outdoors and respect for firearms and how to use them. I will stand by my original thought that if more youngsters and adults, for that matter, could be introduced to the world of hunting there would possibly be less crime. I have introduced a number of young people to hunting. As these young men have now reached adulthood not one has commited a crime.
    David, do you see what I meant about the "analysis".
     

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